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Alternative & Indie - Released May 22, 1995 | Quarterstick Records

Louisville, KY's Rachel's might record for the punk/noise label Quarterstick Records, but their ambitious blend of post-minimalist modern classical music and post-rock experimentalism (guests include ex-Volcano Suns bassist Bob Weston; ex-Rodan leader Jason Noble wrote several tracks with Grimes) has almost nothing at all to do with rock music. These seven pieces, recorded between 1991 and 1994, featuring a cast of 16 musicians in various combinations, range from the two-minute solo piano miniature "Frida Kahlo" to the chaotic fourteen-and-a-half-minute "Full on Night," which blends a full chamber orchestra with electric guitar and tape loops like a more sonically aggressive version of Birdsongs of the Mesozoic. Well-recorded and gorgeously packaged (as are all Rachel's albums), Handwriting is probably not to be recommended to the usual Quarterstick Records fan, but admirers of modern classical music will find much to enjoy. © Stewart Mason /TiVo
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Alternative & Indie - Released February 20, 1996 | Quarterstick Records

Composed for a live theater/dance production about the tragic life of Austrian artist Egon Schiele, the gentle majesty of Music for Egon Schiele is a welcome change of pace for anyone bored with popular music forms, transporting the listener's mood entirely. Rachel's weaves a delicate but highly moving musical fabric that wraps itself around you tightly and pulls you in, simultaneously cradling you lovingly while haunting you with its melancholy ambiance. At times, the emotionally rich compositions work as effectively as any ballet score to tell the artist's tragic story. It is to pianist Rachel Grimes' credit that her pieces convey a stirring sense of drama and vivid imagery that perfectly match her subject. Highly recommended. © Bret Love /TiVo
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Alternative & Indie - Released October 7, 2003 | Quarterstick Records

The experimental avant-pop trio Rachel's fifth release is a collaborative dance/theater piece with the New York ensemble Siti Company. The predominantly instrumental Systems/Layers follows eight characters through one day of their lives in the city, relying on urban field recordings and the distinctive subway chamber music of the group to tell these stories. The melancholy strings and plaintive piano on the beautiful "Water From the Same Source" weep with a reverence for their subject that permeates the record as a whole. These mini-films feel like rainy mornings, and the listener can almost smell the diner coffee while hurrying through pockets of cigarette smoke and bakery truck exhaust. The quietly frantic "Arterial" descends into a swirl of spoken billboard ads before replacing its frenzied piano with cellos on the taut "even/odd." Carousels and ice cream trucks provide the backdrop for curbside greetings, and buzzing electrical poles warm pigeons outside the day shelter as the band nears the end of the workday. Imaginary credits roll as the solo piano album closer "NY Snow Globe" gently unlocks the front door of your apartment, leaving a trail of footprints that beg to be retraced. Like David Byrne's underrated orchestral epic The Forest or Philip Glass' Koyaanisqatsi, Systems/Layers is cerebral and human, transporting you without insulting your intelligence. © James Christopher Monger /TiVo
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Alternative & Indie - Released October 1, 1996 | Quarterstick Records

Formed out of the ashes of Rodan, this loose collective thrives on the neo-classical compositional skills of pianist Rachel Grimes, bassist/organist Jason Noble, and violinist Christian Frederickson. Augmented by a rotating cast of cellists, trumpeters, and drummers, the trio concocts an emotive symphony that, though thoroughly modern, seems timeless. The songs on The Sea and the Bells flow together so seamlessly, it almost seems like one brilliant hour-long epic composition. "Rhine & Courtesan" opens the album with a dynamic, wistful melody that evokes the feeling of riding on ocean waves, then crashes to a startling halt, only to re-emerge with a claustrophobic eeriness that foretells impending doom. Other songs continue the nautical theme, from the haunting "Night at Sea" to the hallucinatory "Letters Home." In an alternative scene where instrumental rockers are a dime a dozen, Rachel's stands out like diamonds on the ocean floor. © Bret Love /TiVo
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Alternative & Indie - Released June 8, 1999 | Quarterstick Records

Rachel's' 1999 album, Selenography, presents more of their thoughtful, expressive, nearly unclassifiable compositions. Many of the 12 pieces here grew from live performances and were nurtured in the group's home studio, blossoming into works with a cosmic and rustic theme. The harpsichords on "Honeysuckle Suite," the gentle interplay of violas and piano on "Kentucky Nocturne," and the subtly dissonant guitars and vibes of "An Evening of Long Goodbyes" prove that Rachel's' already complex and beautiful sound continues to mature. © Heather Phares /TiVo
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Alternative & Indie - Released August 10, 2016 | Rachel's Archive

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Classical - Released October 28, 2016 | Quarterstick Records

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