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Pop - Released March 11, 1983 | Pasha Records

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Metal - Released April 27, 1999 | Epic - Legacy

Quiet Riot's time in the spotlight was brief, but their year of fame produced two of the key songs in '80s metal -- their roaring cover of Slade's "Cum on Feel the Noize" and the anthemic "Bang Your Head (Metal Health)." There may have been better bands than Quiet Riot, but they helped prove that metal could hit the pop charts, as long as there was a hook. Of course, Def Leppard was doing much the same thing at the same time with more style and flair, but there was something about Quiet Riot's everyman looks and crazzeee schtick that gave them a wide appeal. That and the fact that they had a pair of the dumbest, catchiest metallic singles of their time -- songs that worked so well they became touchstones for a generation of metalheads. It almost doesn't matter that the remainder of their catalog was a hit-or-miss affair -- they had their moment in the sun, which few groups ever get. And all most listeners will want out of a Quiet Riot collection are those two songs. In other words, the budget-line Super Hits fulfills that need as well as Metal Health or The Best of Quiet Riot, the two other albums that contain those two songs. In some ways, Super Hits is even better than The Best Of, since it isn't burdened by two unnecessary live tracks and has almost all the essentials -- the pair of hits, "Slick Black Cadillac," "Mama Weer All Crazee Now," "Condition Critical" -- on one affordable disc. There's a bit of filler here, too, but no more so than on The Best Of. Metal Health remains a better portrait of the time, but any casual fan looking for a compilation may want to choose Super Hits, considering its price and selection. Also, because it has those two songs... ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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Pop/Rock - Released May 22, 1994 | Epic - Legacy

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Metal - Released November 8, 2019 | Frontiers Records s.r.l.

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The 14th studio album from the enduring hard rock/glam metal survivors is their follow-up to 2017's Road Rage. It is their second and final album to feature former American Idol contestant James Durbin on vocals, as he left the band shortly before its release. He was replaced by their returning former singer Jizzy Pearl. Featuring the single "Don't Call It Love," the album features another dose of the band's bluesy, chugging hard rock with raw, unpolished production. ~ John D. Buchanan
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Hard Rock - Released July 17, 1986 | Pasha Records

Quiet Riot's third release showed the band sticking fairly close to its strengths (melodic hard rock custom made to be blasted at parties). Bassist Rudy Sarzo was replaced by Chuck Wright (both Sarzo and Wright had been members at different times prior), as the group set out to regain the fans they lost due to singer Kevin DuBrow's press-happy motor mouth. A heavier emphasis on keyboards suggests the band was trying to keep in step with such other chart topping bands as Night Ranger and Bon Jovi, as evidenced by the popular rocker/MTV video, "The Wild and the Young" and the more restrained "Twilight Hotel." Although QR III was greeted favorably by their remaining fans, the album failed to match the mega-sales of their debut, METAL HEALTH. With constant bickering behind the scenes, DuBrow was handed his walking papers shortly after the ensuing tour ended.
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Hard Rock - Released November 15, 1984 | Pasha Records

Condition Critical, Quiet Riot's follow-up to their number one, multi-million-selling commercial breakthrough Metal Health, is nearly identical to its predecessor. Not only do they repeat the hard-driving pop-metal hybrid to the last detail, they even throw in another Slade cover. Like on Metal Health, the Slade cover on Condition Critical ("Mama Weer All Crazee Now") is the finest moment on the record -- it's the only time the riffs have a solid hook and the melody is memorable. However, the rest of the record is well produced and sounds good, even if the quality of the songs is somewhat poor. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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Pop/Rock - Released January 25, 1996 | Epic

For those interested in the genre, The Best of Quiet Riot contains all of Quiet Riot's biggest hits, from "Cum On Feel The Noize" to a live version of "Metal Health." While some favorites such as "Winners Take All" are missing, the most enjoyable pop-metal songs produced by Quiet Riot through 1988 all made it to this compilation. ~ Barry Weber
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Pop/Rock - Released September 1, 2009 | Pasha Records

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Metal - Released October 25, 2019 | Frontiers Records s.r.l.

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Rock - Released November 22, 2005 | Carinco AG

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Rock - Released January 1, 2012 | Shout! Factory Records

The US Festival, funded by Apple Computer co-founder Steve Wozniak, was two mammoth concert and technology exposition events held at Glen Helen Regional Park in San Bernardino, California, over Labor Day weekend in 1982 and Memorial Day weekend in 1983. Shout! Factory has begun issuing performances culled from the US Festival, including 2012's Live at the US Festival 1983 CD/DVD from Quiet Riot. It captures the pop-metal band's complete set at the event on May 29, 1983, which was known as "Heavy Metal Day" and also featured Mötley Crüe, Ozzy Osbourne, Judas Priest, Triumph, Scorpions, and Van Halen. This day was a crucial turning point in hard rock/heavy metal, as it became a major musical and overall cultural force through the rest of the decade. Quiet Riot -- vocalist Kevin DuBrow, lead guitarist Carlos Cavazo, bass guitarist Rudy Sarzo, and drummer Frankie Banali -- helped lead hard rock's charge into the mainstream with its hugely successful album Metal Health, released just a few months before the US Festival. Daytime festival performances are automatically robbed of a little mystique and power, but Quiet Riot gamely entertained the crowd of approximately 500,000 fans (attendance estimates vary depending on the source) as the openers of "Heavy Metal Day," with DuBrow as the boisterous cheerleader (just what every decent frontman needs to be). The Los Angeles quartet's raw set kicks off with "Danger Zone," the studio version of which would not be released until the 2001 expanded and remastered edition of Metal Health hit store shelves. The rest of the songs are all Metal Health tracks, including the frantic "Run for Cover," "Love's a Bitch" (with a stripped-down sound illustrating just how much gloss studio recordings are given), a rollicking "Cum On Feel the Noize" (the Slade cover the band infamously tried to sabotage in the studio when forced by producer and label chief Spencer Proffer to record it, yet which became a gold-selling top five hit single), the catchy "Slick Black Cadillac," party starter "Let's Get Crazy," Cavazo's solo showcase "Battle Axe," and the all-out assault of the set closer "Metal Health (Bang Your Head)." By the end of the year, Metal Health became the first heavy metal album to reach number one on the Billboard album chart and it eventually sold more than six million copies in the United States. Quiet Riot's flameout and fall from grace was rather quick and severe, but the band's successes and its brief moment as a genuine phenomenon can never be taken away. Some popular music is timeless while other popular music captures a specific moment in time, is of its time, and sticks out as such. Quiet Riot's time in the spotlight represented wild fun and youthful abandon, especially in the freewheeling mid-'80s, and there's nothing wrong with that. The only major disappointment with Live at the US Festival 1983 is the package's lack of liner notes. The festival is outlined in a few short paragraphs on the back cover, but the skimpy insert booklet features just two band photos; the Quiet Riot lineup isn't even mentioned, let alone the songwriting credits. Shout! Factory is to be commended for resurrecting US Festival performances, but important archival releases deserve decent liner notes. ~ Bret Adams
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Metal - Released September 26, 2019 | Frontiers Records s.r.l.

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Metal - Released August 27, 2019 | Frontiers Records s.r.l.

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Rock - Released July 7, 2009 | Legacy Recordings

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Rock - Released July 12, 2010 | Epic - Legacy