Categories :

Similar artists

Albums

HI-RES$14.99
CD$12.99

Rap/Hip-Hop - Released April 27, 2018 | Universal Records

Hi-Res
It’s a late christmas present from Post Malone (extremely late). Beerbongs & Bentleys has arrived 4 months after it’s original scheduled release date of December, with the artist needing more time to perfect the record. And it’s worth the wait, as the jam packed LP has a star studded line up, with Nicki Minaj, Ty Dolla $ign and G-Eazy among the featured names. It’s 18 tracks in total, including the smash hits Rockstar (alongside Kanye West’s prodigy 21 Savage) and Psycho, with the latter garnering Post his first number one single in the US. The album as a whole is Post doing what he does best, auto-tuned vocals that flow like a meandering river over wavy synths and trap 808’s. However, unlike his debut album Stoney (2016), he has added some live drums to the mix (Over Now), as well as a more acoustic track with  Stay. Tracks like Paranoid, Rich & Sad and Over Now show Malone’s vulnerability despite the money and the fame but the predominant themes of modern day Hip-Hop are evidently overriding on this LP. Post is a master of creating catchy hooks that can be listened to in any setting and after infiltrating the airwaves with his breakout tune White Iverson (2015), he hasn’t looked back since. He’s the modern day Rockstar!  © Aidan Nickerson/ Qobuz
HI-RES$19.49
CD$16.49

Rap/Hip-Hop - Released December 9, 2016 | Universal Records

Hi-Res
HI-RES$19.49
CD$16.49

Rap/Hip-Hop - Released September 6, 2019 | Republic Records

Hi-Res
CD$1.49

Rap/Hip-Hop - Released December 24, 2018 | Republic Records

CD$16.49

Rap/Hip-Hop - Released April 27, 2018 | Republic Records

Post Malone arrived at full throttle in 2015 with his automatic successes “White Iverson” and “Too Young”, blending bouncing trap and folk country inherited from his dear Texas. Since, the rapper has been swinging between stoner rock with synthetic drums and R&B ballads loaded with blues guitar, ending the genre with its highest feat, “Congratulations”. Always unclassifiable, he easily represents all the contradictions of modern America, between love of firearms, mass depression, professional catch imagery, joyful self-destruction and immersion in online video games.After the “rockstar” hurricane with 21 Savage, the page for the second album opens for Post Malone. Referencing in his own way the excesses of all kinds of his generation, Beerbongs & Bentleys sounds like a hangover. The wake-up call is hard in its content but also sweet with the intertwined voices of Swae Lee, G-Eazy and Ty Dolla Sign. Post Malone’s strength always resides in these obvious melodies at the crossroads, as if Justin Bieber did a jam session with the musicians from Lynyrd Skynyrd. This feeling of 1970s FM rock will allow Post Malone to try to move onto other grounds and to push the boundaries of genres like for example on “Blame It On Me” or the psychedelic “Jonestown (interlude)”. And yet, on the length of these 18 tracks, this is rather the calibrated efficiency which allows the artist to hold on tight with “Over Now” built for stadiums or the successful comeback of London On tha Track on the production of “92 explorer” for example. Pursuing his unique saga, Post Malone offers a dense second album, filled with hits in the making, which establishes him a bit more on his tailor-made throne. © Aurélien Chapuis/Qobuz
CD$1.49

Rap/Hip-Hop - Released July 5, 2019 | Republic Records

HI-RES$14.99
CD$12.99

Rap/Hip-Hop - Released December 9, 2016 | Universal Records

Hi-Res
Establishing identity through the lens of cultural appropriation can be tricky business. On Post Malone's studio debut Stoney, the Dallas-raised musician with gold grills and braids does his best to sing-rap his way through an album's worth of woozy R&B-inflected hip-hop. As a fan of rap and its associated culture, Post delivers with moderate respect, careful not to toe the precarious line over which others like Iggy Azalea and Riff Raff have stumbled. Yet, there still seems to be something missing in the calculated white-guy-does-hip-hop formula. Although he plays guitar and is influenced by Tim McGraw as much as Kanye West, Stoney is mostly devoid of that country twang, save for some outlaw grit on "Broken Whiskey Glass" and faint strumming on "Go Flex" (bonus track "Leave" actually captures his true cross-genre nature better than anything here). Mostly, that part of his background only comes through when he chooses to sing. Those tracks -- notably "No Option" and "I Fall Apart" -- work best, featuring strong vocals that quiver when he pushes it to the limit. Guest vocalists and producers like Kehlani ("Feel"), River Tiber ("Cold"), Pharrell Williams ("Up There"), and Quavo and Metro Boomin ("Congratulations") bolster Stoney with both atmosphere and credibility, while tourmate Justin Bieber increases the star power on the sweet "Cha-Cha"/"Hotline Bling"-esque "Deja Vu." Even though most of the songs bleed indistinguishably into one another, the aptly titled album provides an appropriate soundtrack for a certain type of recreational rest and relaxation (even occasionally threatening to sedate the listener). It's competent and listenable, but many others have tread this same path already. Post Malone has a way to go before standing out with his own unique voice, but there are signs on Stoney that it could happen. ~ Neil Z. Yeung
CD$16.49

Rap/Hip-Hop - Released September 6, 2019 | Republic Records

CD$1.49

Rap/Hip-Hop - Released March 15, 2019 | Republic Records

CD$1.49

Rap/Hip-Hop - Released August 30, 2019 | Republic Records

CD$1.49

Rap/Hip-Hop - Released December 8, 2017 | Universal Records

CD$16.49

Rap/Hip-Hop - Released December 9, 2016 | Universal Records

HI-RES$19.49
CD$16.49

Rap/Hip-Hop - Released December 9, 2016 | Universal Records

Hi-Res
Establishing identity through the lens of cultural appropriation can be tricky business. On Post Malone's studio debut Stoney, the Dallas-raised musician with gold grills and braids does his best to sing-rap his way through an album's worth of woozy R&B-inflected hip-hop. As a fan of rap and its associated culture, Post delivers with moderate respect, careful not to toe the precarious line over which others like Iggy Azalea and Riff Raff have stumbled. Yet, there still seems to be something missing in the calculated white-guy-does-hip-hop formula. Although he plays guitar and is influenced by Tim McGraw as much as Kanye West, Stoney is mostly devoid of that country twang, save for some outlaw grit on "Broken Whiskey Glass" and faint strumming on "Go Flex" (bonus track "Leave" actually captures his true cross-genre nature better than anything here). Mostly, that part of his background only comes through when he chooses to sing. Those tracks -- notably "No Option" and "I Fall Apart" -- work best, featuring strong vocals that quiver when he pushes it to the limit. Guest vocalists and producers like Kehlani ("Feel"), River Tiber ("Cold"), Pharrell Williams ("Up There"), and Quavo and Metro Boomin ("Congratulations") bolster Stoney with both atmosphere and credibility, while tourmate Justin Bieber increases the star power on the sweet "Cha-Cha"/"Hotline Bling"-esque "Deja Vu." Even though most of the songs bleed indistinguishably into one another, the aptly titled album provides an appropriate soundtrack for a certain type of recreational rest and relaxation (even occasionally threatening to sedate the listener). It's competent and listenable, but many others have tread this same path already. Post Malone has a way to go before standing out with his own unique voice, but there are signs on Stoney that it could happen. ~ Neil Z. Yeung
CD$12.99

Rap/Hip-Hop - Released December 9, 2016 | Universal Records

CD$16.49

Rap/Hip-Hop - Released September 6, 2019 | Republic Records

CD$1.49

Rap/Hip-Hop - Released June 16, 2017 | Universal Records

CD$1.49

Rap/Hip-Hop - Released December 24, 2018 | Republic Records

HI-RES$14.99
CD$12.99

Rap/Hip-Hop - Released April 27, 2018 | Universal Records

Hi-Res
In the year and a half following his multi-platinum full-length debut, Post Malone continued his climb up the celebrity ladder, extending Stoney's success with the number one single "rockstar" and second-place follow-up "Psycho." Those tracks landed on his chart-topping second effort, Beerbongs & Bentleys, which arrived in spring 2018. With a team of producers including Louis Bell, PartyNextDoor, Scott Storch, and London on da Track, the set benefits from livelier beats and varied atmospherics, especially when he steps outside of his narcotic comfort zone. However, much like Stoney, it wears out its welcome with a bloated track list and abundance of tiresome, overly dramatic lyrics that often veer into gross and wildly misogynistic territory as Post delivers lines about "beautiful boobies," putting a woman's privates "in a motherf***ing bodybag," and his inability to "make a ho a housewife." Elsewhere, he tries to convey his swirling emotions with gravitas, yet ends up sounding like an ungrateful kid who enjoys the benefits but can't handle the work. "Paranoid," "Rich & Sad," and "Jonestown (Interlude)" are just a few peeks into this tortured soul. Half-rapping, half-singing, he laments that he "can't get no relief," convinced authorities and enemies are following him, even comparing himself to Edward Snowden at one point. He sleeps with a gun, he's lost family, friends, and lovers, and wishes all the money could buy something meaningful. Such bids for sympathy fall flat most of the time, especially considering the abundance of hedonistic odes to sex, drugs, and rap-rock & roll. "Zack and Codeine," "Takin' Shots," "rockstar," and "Same Bitches" are carefully tailored to maintain his reputation, but like his appropriated image, feel forced and disingenuous. Post fares slightly better when he sticks to simple, relatable topics like love and heartbreak. Wading through the murky gloom, a handful of standouts reveal themselves on the latter half of the album. "Otherside" and "Blame It on Me" bleed like lost Auto-Tuned ruminations from 808s & Heartbreak, while the tender acoustic number "Stay" is Post's most natural offering here. Guests like Swae Lee and Ty Dolla $ign get lost in the mix, while G-Eazy, YG, 21 Savage, and Nicki Minaj bolster Post's credibility while stealing the spotlight on their respective tracks. Beerbongs & Bentleys is an apt reflection of his lavish lifestyle and his subsequently begotten hardships, but its attempts at sincerity work only when Post Malone stops trying so hard. ~ Neil Z. Yeung
CD$16.49

Rap/Hip-Hop - Released April 27, 2018 | Republic Records

In the year and a half following his multi-platinum full-length debut, Post Malone continued his climb up the celebrity ladder, extending Stoney's success with the number one single "rockstar" and second-place follow-up "Psycho." Those tracks landed on his chart-topping second effort, Beerbongs & Bentleys, which arrived in spring 2018. With a team of producers including Louis Bell, PartyNextDoor, Scott Storch, and London on da Track, the set benefits from livelier beats and varied atmospherics, especially when he steps outside of his narcotic comfort zone. However, much like Stoney, it wears out its welcome with a bloated track list and abundance of tiresome, overly dramatic lyrics that often veer into gross and wildly misogynistic territory as Post delivers lines about "beautiful boobies," putting a woman's privates "in a motherf***ing bodybag," and his inability to "make a ho a housewife." Elsewhere, he tries to convey his swirling emotions with gravitas, yet ends up sounding like an ungrateful kid who enjoys the benefits but can't handle the work. "Paranoid," "Rich & Sad," and "Jonestown (Interlude)" are just a few peeks into this tortured soul. Half-rapping, half-singing, he laments that he "can't get no relief," convinced authorities and enemies are following him, even comparing himself to Edward Snowden at one point. He sleeps with a gun, he's lost family, friends, and lovers, and wishes all the money could buy something meaningful. Such bids for sympathy fall flat most of the time, especially considering the abundance of hedonistic odes to sex, drugs, and rap-rock & roll. "Zack and Codeine," "Takin' Shots," "rockstar," and "Same Bitches" are carefully tailored to maintain his reputation, but like his appropriated image, feel forced and disingenuous. Post fares slightly better when he sticks to simple, relatable topics like love and heartbreak. Wading through the murky gloom, a handful of standouts reveal themselves on the latter half of the album. "Otherside" and "Blame It on Me" bleed like lost Auto-Tuned ruminations from 808s & Heartbreak, while the tender acoustic number "Stay" is Post's most natural offering here. Guests like Swae Lee and Ty Dolla $ign get lost in the mix, while G-Eazy, YG, 21 Savage, and Nicki Minaj bolster Post's credibility while stealing the spotlight on their respective tracks. Beerbongs & Bentleys is an apt reflection of his lavish lifestyle and his subsequently begotten hardships, but its attempts at sincerity work only when Post Malone stops trying so hard. ~ Neil Z. Yeung
CD$1.49

Rap/Hip-Hop - Released March 14, 2019 | Republic Records