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Pop - Released September 23, 2013 | Beating Drum

Hi-Res Distinctions 4F de Télérama - Sélection FIP - Hi-Res Audio
If it weren't for the high fidelity, Between Dogs and Wolves, the fifth long-player from British-born singer/songwriter Piers Faccini, could easily be mistaken for a late-'60s/early-'70s Harvest Records release, appearing in a display case next to Shirley & Dolly Collins' Anthems in Eden or Roy Harper's Stormcock. Richly detailed yet tastefully delivered ballads like "Black Rose," "Like Water Like Stone," and "Broken Mirror" resonate in a similar way to classic folk offerings from Nick Drake, Martin Carthy, and John Renbourn. Like his closest contemporary, survival skills-instructor-turned modern British folk emancipator Sam Lee, Faccini uses the genre as a foundation to explore other styles, most notably on songs like the jazz-tinged "Pieces of Ourselves" and the breezy "Il Cammino," the latter of which pays homage to his Italian heritage. Elsewhere, he mines familiar themes like love and loss through an enigmatic musical prism that runs the gamut from deeply melancholic ("Feather Light" and "Girl in the Corner") to hesitantly hopeful ("Wide Shut Eyes" and "Missing Words"), all the while maintaining a stately singer/songwriter vibe that feels both authentic and refined. Between Dogs and Wolves is a quiet record filled with big emotions, but it requires the listener's complete attention, and even then it can be elusive. That said, it all goes down like the smoothest of drams, and between Faccini's smoky, Leonard Cohen-meets-Steve Kilbey (the Church) cadence, his finger-picking acumen, and deeply felt, yet measured and simplistic lyrics, it's hard to resist the urge to go back for seconds. ~ James Christopher Monger
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Pop/Rock - Released March 5, 2012 | Corida

Distinctions Stereophile: Face the Music
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Pop/Rock - Released March 5, 2012 | Corida

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Pop - Released April 6, 2009 | tôt Ou tard

Since Bob Dylan emerged in the early 1960s, people have been declaring subsequent singer/songwriters to be "the new Dylan." The first "new Dylan may have been Donovan, the Scottish folk-poet who came along shortly afterwards. No one ever seems to have been called a "new Donovan," but that wouldn't be a bad way to describe Piers Faccini on the basis of his third album, Two Grains of Sand. The British-born, French-raised Faccini has a similar calm, breathy tenor (he lacks Donovan's lower notes), and he sings over simple folk arrangements often consisting of a fingerpicked acoustic guitar line, plus a violin, say, or a harmonica, now and then with a harmony vocal or simple, restrained drum pattern. These polite folk-pop performances are in the service of Faccini's lyrics, which are heavily poetic, but not particularly original, laced with clichés and platitudes. Now and then he works up an emotional declaration, as on the anti-war "A Storm Is Going to Come," but most of the time he is reflecting on the vagaries of love by employing nature imagery. Actually, it's better to focus on the gentle grooves and contours of the music than on the words, anyway. Piers Faccini is the sort of performer who should assure that, no matter how old the members of Fairport Convention get, there will still be people to play their annual Cropredy Festival. ~ William Ruhlmann
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House - Released March 11, 2016 | Circus company

Pop - Released October 21, 2016 | Six Degrees

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Alternative & Indie - Released April 29, 2014 | Six Degrees Records

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Pop - Released October 14, 2014 | Six Degrees Records

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Alternative & Indie - Released September 10, 2013 | Six Degrees Records

Alternative & Indie - Released | Six Degrees

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Combining the sounds of West Africa with English folk, American blues, and the Italian tarantella, My Wilderness is the typically well-traveled fourth solo album from London-based singer/songwriter Piers Faccini. Released through the Tôt ou Tard label, the former Charley Marlowe frontman's follow-up to 2009's Two Grains of Sand features 13 poetic tracks inspired by the likes of John Martyn and Nick Drake, including collaborations with French cellist Vincent Segal and Malian kora player Ballaké Sissoko. ~ Jon O'Brien