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Classical - Released November 1, 2010 | Warner Classics

Hi-Res Booklets Distinctions 5 de Diapason - Gramophone Editor's Choice - Choc de Classica - Choc Classica de l'année - Hi-Res Audio
Countertenor Philippe Jaroussky continues to amaze with the facility of his technique in the most demanding coloratura repertoire, the intelligence and deep feeling of his musicianship, and, most especially, with the full, vibrant quality of his distinctive voice. It has lost none of its freshness since he burst onto the international scene in the last years of the 20th century, and has become a richer, stronger instrument without giving up any of its remarkable agility. A champion of neglected Baroque composers, he turns his attention to Antonio Caldara (ca. 1671-1736), a near-contemporary of Vivaldi's. Like Vivaldi, he began his career in Venice and ended it in Vienna, and Vivaldi is the composer whose music Caldara's most resembles. As renowned as Vivaldi in his lifetime and even more prolific, he fell into obscurity soon after his death and remained essentially a historical footnote until the late 20th century. Even so, there has never been a Caldara renaissance, and based on the selections recorded here, one is unlikely to be coming. The music is created with consummate skill, the text setting is idiomatic, and these opera arias demonstrate dramatic flair and have considerable charm; they could reasonably be mistaken for the work of Vivaldi on a fair-to-middling, or even good, but not a great day. These selections, presumably the most interesting that Jaroussky culled from his research, are all very fine in their own right but lack the dazzle that, in the best Vivaldi, makes the listener sit up and gasp at its unpredictable inventiveness or wit or profound emotional integrity or ravishingly limpid lyricism. It would be hard to imagine a more compelling case for this material than that made by Jaroussky and Emmanuelle Haïm, who plays harpsichord and conducts Concerto Köln. They invest this music with such life and devote such exquisite attention to its nuances that the album fully deserves the attention of fans of the Baroque or Vivaldi, or of anyone who simply cherishes hearing terrifically talented and spirited performers giving their all to music they clearly love. The album is beautifully produced and has clean, vibrant, and natural sound, with excellent balance. © TiVo
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Classical - Released January 5, 2015 | Erato - Warner Classics

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or de l'année - Diapason d'or - Gramophone Record of the Month - 4 étoiles Classica
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Classical - Released March 3, 2017 | Erato - Warner Classics

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - 5 Sterne Fono Forum Klassik
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Vocal Music (Secular and Sacred) - Released November 1, 2013 | Warner Classics International

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Classical - Released October 6, 2017 | Warner Classics

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
For this performance, Philippe Jaroussky has picked a bouquet of pieces from lesser-known operas. Siroe, Riccardo primo, Flavio, Tolomeo and many others, written for the London stage between 1715 and 1740. With his Artaserse ensemble, which Jaroussky considers to have been the place where he has been able to fully mature, over several years of playing concerts all over the world,  the counter-tenor also presents a reflection on the repertoire of the castrato. Because, since this little procedure was discontinued, the singers tackling these roles have been performing airs which were not written for us, and have to be adapted to us. Bearing in mind that when Haendel put on an opera with a different troupe, he didn't hesitate to re-work entire roles to adapt them to new singers; Jaroussky has taken it upon himself to do the same for some of these airs, which he knows are not suited to his type of voice, and for which original versions with the correct tones are not always available. Regardless, this is an excellent exploration of Haendel's rarities, with some virtuoso turns, and material running from the introverted to the narrative, the lyrical to the explosive. Note that Artaserse are playing without a conductor, Jaroussky leading from the front, with his voice. © SM/Qobuz
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Classical - Released May 18, 2018 | Warner Classics

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 Sterne Fono Forum Klassik
This is the first-ever recording of this particular version of Orfeo ed Euridice by Gluck: the one he wrote for the Royal Theatre of Naples, for the 1774 Carnival. That said, it is based in part on the first, Viennese, version, dated 1762 (in which Orpheus was sung by an alto castrato), but also on the 1769 revision for Parma, where the role of Orpheus was given to a male soprano. The notes, the tonalities, the instrumentation, the tempos and the number of dynamics underwent substantial modifications in the version for the Neapolitan Carnival: the work is at once perfectly recognisable, and yet different from its normal form; and some completely new numbers are added, of which the first is quite possibly the work of dilettante aristocrat Diego Naselli, and maybe the second, too. The orchestration has also undergone many modifications, surely to do with local constraints and availabilities. The Neapolitan success of 1774 was such that in November of the same year, the famous Teatro San Carlo took on the work – again in a new version, with not three but eight characters and several apocryphal numbers from Johann Christian Bach and other contemporary stars, which stretched the work out to three acts, whereas the present version only has one, split into six scenes. Orpheus is sung by Philippe Jaroussky, Eurydice by Amanda Forsythe, Amore by Emöke Baráth, while Diego Fasolis gives a spirited lead to the ensemble I Barocchisti and the Coro della Radio Svizzera (The Swiss Radio Choir). Lovers of Gluck will be delighted to discover yet another of the many possible facets of a work which has seen countless revisions and wanderings. © SM/Qobuz
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Classical - Released October 7, 2016 | Erato - Warner Classics

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
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Classical - Released February 13, 2015 | Erato - Warner Classics

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 Sterne Fono Forum Klassik
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Classical - Released November 13, 2020 | Warner Classics

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After a recording career spanning almost twenty years, Philippe Jaroussky is looking forward. His new album, recorded in June 2020 just after France’s first Covid-19 lockdown, was conceived as a project that would complete the French countertenors previous recordings. After having already tried his hand at baroque and motet tunes, he has now decided to throw himself into Italian Oratorio. Of the 18 tracks on this record, more than one third are recording world firsts: songs by Pietro Torri, Fortunato Chelleri, Nicola Fago, Benedetto Marcello, an array of discoveries which bear witness to the 17th century’s intellectual and musical abundance as well as the first half of the century which followed it.At the head of the Artaserse ensemble, Philippe Jaroussky lifts one up with his emotive music. We are met with tragedy, pathos and dramatic force such as the sublime aria “Dormi, o fulmine di Guerra” from Alessandro Scarlatti’s Guidita, or the famous “Lascia la spina” used by Händel in Il Trionfo del Tempo e del Disingano, Almira and Rinaldo. We are presented with an exemplary panorama of Italian Oratorio from a time when the peninsula was a patchwork of independent states centered in great cities like Rome, Naples, Venice or Milan. © François Hudry/Qobuz
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Classical - Released October 25, 2019 | Warner Classics

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Classical - Released October 17, 2014 | Erato - Warner Classics

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Vocal Music (Secular and Sacred) - Released October 28, 2013 | Warner Classics International

Russian Julia Lezhneva here shows an admirably gutsy attitude toward developing her repertory, avoiding familiar milestones in favor of an original project. Here she is paired with French countertenor Philippe Jaroussky in a program of works by Pergolesi for two high voices, strings, and continuo: the Stabat mater, for which there are plenty of other recordings, and the less-common Laudate pueri dominum and Confitebor tibi Domine. The distinctive feature here -- which might tempt some to use the word "gimmick," but listen before doing so -- is that Lezhneva fashions her voice into a very close copy of Jaroussky's, which is not at all an easy thing to do. Put this together with the precise, rather edgy playing of I Barocchisti under Diego Fasolis, and the result is a rather otherworldly Stabat mater. The tragic quality of the work and its association with Pergolesi's short life are played down (probably a good thing, for Pergolesi wasn't planning to die at age 26) in favor of creating a hypnotic globe of sound from which the two singers' voices emerge as flashing accents along with the punchy sound of Fasolis' strings. It may not be to everyone's taste, but it's quite an accomplishment, and the album continues to serve notice of Lezhneva's emergence as a major star in Baroque singing. © TiVo
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Classical - Released March 8, 2019 | Warner Classics

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Although Francesco Cavalli’s twenty-seven operas that still exist today have increasingly become part of the world’s opera repertoire, there was a time when the works of this flamboyant composer had completely fell into obscurity. As they were not published like those of his master Monteverdi, Cavalli’s works remained as (often incomplete) manuscripts and were painstakingly reconstituted for a modern edition. By the end of the 1960s, Raymond Leppard and musicologist Alan Curtis set out to resuscitate this forgotten music through memorable stage performances at Glyndebourne Festival, featuring a brilliant casting of some of the greatest voices of the time: Janet Baker, Ileana Cotrubas, James Bowman and Hugues Cuenod. The staging and sound restitution were particularly extravagant, and audiences discovered − in both an album and a filmed performance − an incredibly varied music characterised by constant gender swapping and triumphant eroticism, in often uproarious situations! This extraordinary sensory exaltation, from tragedy to parody, is expertly expressed by Philippe Jaroussky – a countertenor very familiar with Cavalli’s work − on this album made up of around twenty extracts that perfectly encapsulate the Venetian public’s expectations. Around him, the voices of soprano Emöke Baráth and contralto Marie-Nicole Lemieux give rise to a few delightful duos. © François Hudry/Qobuz
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Classical - Released May 18, 2018 | Warner Classics

Booklet
The prime attraction of this Erato release is the presence of French countertenor Philippe Jaroussky, who is in fine voice, his presence alone is reason enough for Jaroussky fans to go out and buy it. Beyond this, however, there's a more arcane draw: the album presents Gluck's opera Orfeo ed Euridice in a previously unheard and little-known version. Gluck modified and adapted Orfeo ed Euridice several times, including reworking it entirely for French-language presentation in Paris in 1774. What's heard here is a different revival, for a pair of Italian runs in the years before that. This version was first performed on-stage only in 2014, but it makes an ideal vehicle for Jaroussky: the arias for Orfeo were transposed upward and generally fitted to the voice of a male soprano, giving Jaroussky plenty to do. The choral passages in this reading, with the Swiss Radio Chorus led by I Barocchisti conductor Diego Fasolis, are vigorous and clearly articulated, and to hear the performance at its best you might sample the Dance of the Furies and Specters at the beginning of Act Two and Orfeo's subsequent attempt to calm them down, showing Jaroussky at his formidable best. Elsewhere, sample around: the other singers are uniformly strong, but to an extent, I Barocchisti and Fasolis deliver a performance with Baroque punchiness instead of Classical grace, and if you're looking for the traditional sort of graceful Gluck performance, you may find them a bit jolting. There is no question, however, that the recording delivers impressive singing in a little-known iteration of Gluck's classic. © TiVo
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Classical - Released April 8, 2016 | Warner Classics

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Classical - Released March 8, 2019 | Warner Classics

Booklet
Is countertenor Philippe Jaroussky's voice losing some of its uncanny leaping creaminess as he enters his fifth decade? Maybe marginally, but that's more than counterbalanced by his recent efforts to move into the new (or older) territory of the 17th century. Here he takes on the music of Francesco Cavalli in a wonderful collection that can serve as an introduction to this composer as well as a display of Jaroussky's vocal gifts; many of Cavalli's operas are sampled. Cavalli is not exactly a household name, but this Venetian composer as much as anyone else turned going to the opera into the public event that it remains today. He combined the epic mode of Monteverdi with more modern aria types and humorous elements, both of which are abundantly on display here. They are handled nicely by Jaroussky, and he goes into new vocal territory when doing so. Sample the aria "Cieche tenebre" from the opera Pompeo Magno, which gives the countertenor's low register a workout and finds it in good shape. Jaroussky leads off with "Ombra mai fu" from Cavalli's Xerse, an aria whose title will be familiar even to casual opera listeners because Handel set the same text, and the same libretto, 85 years later (spelling it as Serse). This shows not only the general persistence of 17th century ideas into the High Baroque, but also the influence of Cavalli specifically, and listeners will enjoy comparing the two settings. There are tender love songs, stirring martial arias, and action-packed scenes. Jaroussky is backed by his handpicked Ensemble Artaserse, and the ensemble seems to breathe. Highly recommended. © TiVo
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Classical - Released March 1, 2005 | Warner Classics

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Classical - Released November 24, 2017 | naïve classique

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Classical - Released October 18, 2019 | Warner Classics

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Classical - Released January 12, 2018 | La Musica

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This re-release of an album recorded in 2003 and for a long, long time unavailable on the market - sometimes it can be found on sale for eye-watering sums - is the vision supplied by Philippe Jaroussky and the musicians of the Artaserse ensemble, of the 14 concert airs (and what airs!) written by Benedetto Ferrari (1603-1681). While he is not very well known today, Ferrari was a great star in his day, and one might well suspect that the final duet from L'incoronazione di Poppea, signed by Monteverdi - the extraordinarily moving Pur ti miro, pur ti godo  - might well have been written by Ferrari. Alas, none of his own operas have survived, but we still know three books of airs by Ferrari: the Musiche varie a voce sola (published in Venice in 1633, 1637 and 1641), from which Jaroussky has made this judicious selection. If the musical differences between the airs do not necessarily jump out at the listener at first, no-one can deny the virtuosity of the young Jaroussky on display here - he was 25 years old at the time, and he had not yet won the numerous awards which would propel his career onwards, starting with the 2004 "Victoire de la Musique".  But it was all already there... © SM/Qobuz