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Classical - Released November 1, 2010 | Warner Classics

Booklets Distinctions 5 de Diapason - Gramophone Editor's Choice - Choc de Classica - Choc Classica de l'année - Hi-Res Audio
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Classical - Released January 5, 2015 | Erato - Warner Classics

Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or de l'année - Diapason d'or - Gramophone Record of the Month - 4 étoiles de Classica
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Classical - Released March 3, 2017 | Erato - Warner Classics

Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - 5 Sterne Fono Forum Klassik
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Classical - Released May 18, 2018 | Warner Classics

Booklet Distinctions 5 Sterne Fono Forum Klassik
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This is the first-ever recording of this particular version of Orfeo ed Euridice by Gluck: the one he wrote for the Royal Theatre of Naples, for the 1774 Carnival. That said, it is based in part on the first, Viennese, version, dated 1762 (in which Orpheus was sung by an alto castrato), but also on the 1769 revision for Parma, where the role of Orpheus was given to a male soprano. The notes, the tonalities, the instrumentation, the tempos and the number of dynamics underwent substantial modifications in the version for the Neapolitan Carnival: the work is at once perfectly recognisable, and yet different from its normal form; and some completely new numbers are added, of which the first is quite possibly the work of dilettante aristocrat Diego Naselli, and maybe the second, too. The orchestration has also undergone many modifications, surely to do with local constraints and availabilities. The Neapolitan success of 1774 was such that in November of the same year, the famous Teatro San Carlo took on the work – again in a new version, with not three but eight characters and several apocryphal numbers from Johann Christian Bach and other contemporary stars, which stretched the work out to three acts, whereas the present version only has one, split into six scenes. Orpheus is sung by Philippe Jaroussky, Eurydice by Amanda Forsythe, Amore by Emöke Baráth, while Diego Fasolis gives a spirited lead to the ensemble I Barocchisti and the Coro della Radio Svizzera (The Swiss Radio Choir). Lovers of Gluck will be delighted to discover yet another of the many possible facets of a work which has seen countless revisions and wanderings. © SM/Qobuz

Vocal Music (Secular and Sacred) - Released November 1, 2013 | Warner Classics International

Booklet Distinctions Hi-Res Audio
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Classical - Released October 6, 2017 | Warner Classics

Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
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For this performance, Philippe Jaroussky has picked a bouquet of pieces from lesser-known operas. Siroe, Riccardo primo, Flavio, Tolomeo and many others, written for the London stage between 1715 and 1740. With his Artaserse ensemble, which Jaroussky considers to have been the place where he has been able to fully mature, over several years of playing concerts all over the world,  the counter-tenor also presents a reflection on the repertoire of the castrato. Because, since this little procedure was discontinued, the singers tackling these roles have been performing airs which were not written for us, and have to be adapted to us. Bearing in mind that when Haendel put on an opera with a different troupe, he didn't hesitate to re-work entire roles to adapt them to new singers; Jaroussky has taken it upon himself to do the same for some of these airs, which he knows are not suited to his type of voice, and for which original versions with the correct tones are not always available. Regardless, this is an excellent exploration of Haendel's rarities, with some virtuoso turns, and material running from the introverted to the narrative, the lyrical to the explosive. Note that Artaserse are playing without a conductor, Jaroussky leading from the front, with his voice. © SM/Qobuz

Classical - Released October 7, 2016 | Erato - Warner Classics

Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
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There are several possible reasons to hear this album of church cantatas by French countertenor Philippe Jaroussky. You might be curious as to how he fares for the first time through an entire disc in the German language, and the answer is that he's done his homework. You might be pleased to find that Telemann, writing solo cantatas here, proved an adept imitator of the Bach style. You might enjoy the lively sound of the Freiburg Baroque Orchestra under violinist-director Petra Müllejans, who appreciates the forward-looking quality of this music (even Bach's) and gives it the right rhythmic drive. And the oboe work of Ann-Kathrin Brüggemann, weaving in and out of Jaroussky's vocal lines, is a pleasure. Yet the main attraction, as always with this creamy-voiced soul, is Jaroussky's instrument itself, undiminished by a decade in the classical Top Ten. You can't go wrong in sampling, but try one of the Telemann cantatas, perhaps the aria "Ich bin betrübt bis in den Tod, for the revelation that this composer, who prized entertainment, could be serious when he tried to be. Erato delivers superior sound in the Ensemblehaus Freiburg, not a place where they usually hang out, and in general this makes for an essential pick for Jaroussky fans, and is an equally good place to start with this remarkable voice.

Classical - Released February 13, 2015 | Erato - Warner Classics

Booklet Distinctions 5 Sterne Fono Forum Klassik
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Sacred Vocal Music - Released January 2, 2008 | naïve Opus 111

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Classical - Released October 17, 2014 | Erato - Warner Classics

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Classical - Released May 18, 2018 | Warner Classics

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Classical - Released January 12, 2018 | La Musica

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This re-release of an album recorded in 2003 and for a long, long time unavailable on the market - sometimes it can be found on sale for eye-watering sums - is the vision supplied by Philippe Jaroussky and the musicians of the Artaserse ensemble, of the 14 concert airs (and what airs!) written by Benedetto Ferrari (1603-1681). While he is not very well known today, Ferrari was a great star in his day, and one might well suspect that the final duet from L'incoronazione di Poppea, signed by Monteverdi - the extraordinarily moving Pur ti miro, pur ti godo  - might well have been written by Ferrari. Alas, none of his own operas have survived, but we still know three books of airs by Ferrari: the Musiche varie a voce sola (published in Venice in 1633, 1637 and 1641), from which Jaroussky has made this judicious selection. If the musical differences between the airs do not necessarily jump out at the listener at first, no-one can deny the virtuosity of the young Jaroussky on display here - he was 25 years old at the time, and he had not yet won the numerous awards which would propel his career onwards, starting with the 2004 "Victoire de la Musique".  But it was all already there... © SM/Qobuz

Vocal Music (Secular and Sacred) - Released October 28, 2013 | Warner Classics International

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Classical - Released March 1, 2005 | Warner Classics

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Classical - Released November 24, 2017 | naïve classique

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Classical - Released October 6, 2017 | Warner Classics

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Classical - Released October 17, 2014 | Erato - Warner Classics

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Classical - Released April 8, 2016 | Warner Classics

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Classical - Released October 7, 2016 | Erato - Warner Classics

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Classical - Released March 3, 2017 | Erato - Warner Classics

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