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Rock - Released April 23, 2021 | Universal Music Enterprises

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Blues - Released June 7, 2019 | Universal Music Enterprises

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Rock - Released January 1, 2000 | Universal Music Enterprises

It's no secret that one of the best-selling rock albums of all time was the double-LP Frampton Comes Alive, which rocketed former Humble Pie guitarist Peter Frampton into the oftentimes harsh realm of superstar status. That was 1976. Twenty-four years later, Frampton came alive once again with a rousing 75-minute set recorded at Pine Knob Music Theatre in Detroit on July 17, 1999. The set combines retellings of the best tracks from Frampton Comes Alive with an impressive collection of later songs. There is the smooth groove of "Lines on My Face," counterbalanced with the power pop of "Show Me the Way" and "All I Wanna Be (Is by Your Side)." Frampton is again backed by Bob Mayo on keyboards, Chad Cromwell on drums, and John Regan on bass guitar. This is a band filled with talent and maturity, performing with all the dynamics and emotion of a Dire Straits or Pink Floyd. The ballads far outweigh the rockers this time around, with Frampton singing beautifully on tunes like "If You Say Goodbye" and "Oh for Another Day," and there is a short but sweet acoustic instrumental, "Nassau," leading into Frampton's popular "Baby I Love Your Way." But don't think Frampton doesn't still kick ass. He dishes up the bluesy rock of "They Can't Take That Away From Me" along with the rocking "You Had to Be There" and the old favorite "Do You Feel Like We Do?" He also kicks things into overdrive with the rocking instrumental "Off the Hook." Closing out the set is "I Don't Need No Doctor," the Ashford and Simpson tune, rocked up in a style reminiscent of Mountain with a vocal that at times sounds an awful lot like Johnny Winter. This track is a smoker, and a fitting closer for an impressive album that finds Peter Frampton playing and singing just as well, if not better, than he did on that "other" live record. © Michael B. Smith /TiVo
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Pop - Released April 27, 2010 | Universal Music Enterprises

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Rock - Released February 26, 2016 | Universal Music Enterprises

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Now

Rock - Released August 26, 2003 | Universal Music Enterprises

"I'm back" acknowledges Peter Frampton in the song of the same name from his first studio album in nine years. But even though Frampton claims he had complete control over every aspect of this release, the results show that maybe a good A&R person should have been hired for consultation. While this is undoubtedly a Frampton disc, complete with strummy ballads, a handful of harder-edged tunes, and lots of shimmering guitar solos, songs like the riff rocker "I'm Back" -- that sports puerile lyrics such as "I'm back, like Schwarzenegger in Terminator, I'm back like a boomerang" -- could use some tinkering. Otherwise, little has changed over the decades since Frampton's superstar days. He can still write a pretty Beatles-esque ballad like this disc's charming "Above it All." However, the sap factor is far too high on the tune to his daughter "Mia Rose," a track that should have stayed as a personal lullaby and not something he needs to subject the rest of us to. Keyboardist Bob Mayo -- from the Frampton Comes Alive band -- has stuck in there; but the guitarist co-writes the majority of these cuts with Nashville pro Gordon Kennedy, who also adds backing vocals. There's nothing wrong with shuffling pop-rockers like "Flying Without Wings," or the opening "Verge of a Thing," except Frampton tries too hard to rock out, and barely manages to navigate his way through increasingly clumsy lyrics. Far better are the numerous ballads and the Jeff Beck/Blow By Blow-styled jazz-rock instrumental "Greens," which showcases Frampton's beautifully incisive quicksilver guitar. "While My Guitar Gently Weeps," the album's only cover, is a by-the-numbers but heartfelt tribute to George Harrison, highlighted by a powerful solo. Now is a middling return to form, with peaks, valleys and enough sparks to show that Peter Frampton remains a vibrant artist who might have some better albums in him. © Hal Horowitz /TiVo
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Rock - Released October 20, 2020 | Universal Music Enterprises

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Rock - Released January 1, 2010 | Universal Music Enterprises

Peter Frampton releases records so rarely that he’s almost forced to plainly admit their themes in the titles: 2003’s Now dealt with the present while its 2010 successor, Thank You Mr. Churchill, casts an eye toward the past, Frampton piecing together his history from WWII to modern times. Fittingly for a concept album so ambitious, Frampton has wound up with a heavy progressive rock record, roiling with dense riffs, segmented songs, and winding blues jams. Happily, he hasn't ignored his previous life as either a Tamla/Motown devotee or pop star, cutting the introspection and ambition with a handful of lighter moments -- such as the unashamed arena rocker “I’m Due a You,” the irrepressible bounce of “Invisible Man” (which does indeed feature members of the Funk Brothers), and even the circular acoustic guitar of “Restraint” -- that give the album levity while broadening its palette, helping to push Thank You Mr. Churchill to one of Frampton’s richest records and unexpectedly one of his best. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Pop - Released January 1, 2010 | Universal Music Enterprises

Peter Frampton releases records so rarely that he’s almost forced to plainly admit their themes in the titles: 2003’s Now dealt with the present while its 2010 successor, Thank You Mr. Churchill, casts an eye toward the past, Frampton piecing together his history from WWII to modern times. Fittingly for a concept album so ambitious, Frampton has wound up with a heavy progressive rock record, roiling with dense riffs, segmented songs, and winding blues jams. Happily, he hasn't ignored his previous life as either a Tamla/Motown devotee or pop star, cutting the introspection and ambition with a handful of lighter moments -- such as the unashamed arena rocker “I’m Due a You,” the irrepressible bounce of “Invisible Man” (which does indeed feature members of the Funk Brothers), and even the circular acoustic guitar of “Restraint” -- that give the album levity while broadening its palette, helping to push Thank You Mr. Churchill to one of Frampton’s richest records and unexpectedly one of his best. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Rock - Released January 13, 1986 | Universal Music Enterprises

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Rock - Released January 8, 1989 | Universal Music Enterprises