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Rock - Released June 7, 2019 | BMG Rights Management (US) LLC

Alt-rock godfather Perry Farrell is best known for his pivotal role in Jane's Addiction, but in the years between breakups and reunions for his best-known band, the singer always kept active with other projects. In addition to more traditional bands like Porno for Pyros, Farrell sporadically worked on solo material. Kind Heaven is his third solo album, following a winding path from 1999's Rev, a piecemeal compilation of various Farrell-related rarities, to 2001's confusing mishmash of spiritual electronica Song Yet to Be Sung. Kind Heaven is every bit as ambitious an album as we've come to expect from Farrell, but it's more in line with the eclectic hard rock energy of his most popular work. Politics, sex, and hope for the future are all filtered through Farrell's distinctive presence on the album's nine songs. The tracks "(red white and blue) Cheerfulness" and "Pirate Punk Politician" both have the same hard-hitting feel of classic Jane's Addiction grooves, the latter updated with hints of dubstep production. Farrell plays to his strengths, his trademark high-pitched and heavily delayed vocals sitting high in the mix. Production from rock royalty Tony Visconti brings a clarity to Farrell's weird musings, transforming a stream-of-consciousness vamp like "Snakes Have Many Hips" into a sleazy blur of chamber pop glam rock. Farrell duets with his wife, Etty Lau Farrell, on several tracks like the high-tension ode to lust "Machine Girl." While Kind Heaven wanders through various strange inspirations, the songs feel connected and focused in a way Farrell hadn't managed on earlier solo albums, or even on fantastic but overreaching albums from other projects. The flow is cohesive but varied, allowing interesting ideas to really pop when they arrive. Album closer "Let's All Pray for This World" begins with a swell of classical strings and bright acoustic guitars, standing out from the sultry rock that makes up much of the album but also making sense as a final track. At this point, Farrell is an elder statesman of forward-thinking rock music, and the swim of angular ideas that make up Kind Heaven is further evidence of his one-of-a-kind perspective. ~ Fred Thomas
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Rev

Alternative & Indie - Released October 29, 1999 | Warner Records

Perry Farrell has been the singer of two groundbreaking, influential bands -- Jane's Addiction and Porno for Pyros -- so it was only fitting that a best-of should be issued. The 1999 16-track compilation Rev included highlights and rarities from both outfits, as well as a pair of new solo tracks. While most of the expected songs are featured ("Mountain Song," "Stop," "Pets," "Tahitian Moon,"), the track listing ultimately leaves out many highlights: "Ain't No Right," "Classic Girl," "Meija," and "Cursed Male" are all noticeably absent. Longtime fans will want Rev since it includes several hard-to-find tracks -- a 12" remix of "Been Caught Stealing," a few cover songs (the Grateful Dead's "Ripple," Lou Reed's "Satellite of Love," the Bernstein/Sondheim composition "Tonight"), and an original only previously available on the Private Parts soundtrack, "Hard Charger." Unfortunately, the two all-new Farrell solo tracks aren't as stellar as you'd expect. Always one to inject new musical forms and ideas into his sound, Farrell tackles electronic/drum'n'bass on the title track (which features restrained guest appearances by Rage Against the Machine's Tom Morello and the Red Hot Chili Peppers' John Frusciante), as well as a vapid, totally deconstructed rendition of Led Zeppelin's "Whole Lotta Love." While Rev serves its purpose as a decent introduction for newcomers, longtime fans will sense it could have been a whole lot better. ~ Greg Prato
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Rock - Released July 16, 2001 | Virgin Catalog (V81)

Even though Perry Farrell didn't disappear in the latter half of the '90s, it sure felt like he had. Lollapalooza dried up not long after he left, his follow-up festival was stillborn, Porno for Pyros never achieved the high profile or respect of Jane's Addiction -- and when Jane's did reunite in 1997, its companion album and tour were a distant memory a year later. So, he seized the opportunity of silence by laying low, developing a new sound for a new project -- namely, a solo career. During his self-imposed exile he, like many members of the alt-rock generation, became convinced that electronica was the next bold step forward, so he absorbed the sounds and learned how to make it himself, crossing it with worldbeat and new age spirituality for his ambitious comeback record, Song Yet to Be Sung. Part of the problem of working in isolation for a prolonged period of time -- which he essentially was, even if he worked with a number of different collaborators -- is that the end product feels somewhat hermetic whenever it's released. This can be a good thing, since it can help protect an individual vision, which is somewhat true of Song. Farrell certainly has his own brand of mysticism, globe-spanning electronica, and he keeps his focus throughout the record, letting the moods change slowly with the flow of the rhythms. It's easily the most consistent record he's cut since Ritual de lo Habitual, and it has a generous spirit that's brand new to Farrell's music. This all makes for an interesting listen and, if you're coming from a similar vantage, it could be quite compelling. Yet despite the idiosyncratic, individual vision Farrell displays throughout the record, it isn't exactly visionary, especially compared to records released during his prolonged absence from music-making. No matter its accomplishments, it sounds strangely dated, sharing more with Andrew Weatherall productions from the early '90s than such late-'90s rock-electronica hallmarks as Homogenic. This doesn't discount what Farrell's accomplished here, since this holds its own against Jane's Addiction far more than any Porno for Pyros record, but it feels more like a product of the '90s than a new millennium. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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Rock - Released March 29, 2019 | BMG Rights Management (US) LLC

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Rock - Released May 31, 2019 | BMG Rights Management (US) LLC

Rock - Released April 1, 2017 | BMG Rights Management (US) LLC

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