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Rock - Released May 8, 2015 | Parlophone UK

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Rock - Released May 25, 2018 | Parlophone UK

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Rock - Released September 7, 2018 | Parlophone UK

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Rock - Released August 1, 2018 | Parlophone UK

Rock - Released September 22, 2017 | Parlophone UK

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Rock - Released February 22, 2019 | Parlophone UK

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Rock - Released February 8, 2019 | Parlophone UK

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Rock - Released March 26, 2015 | Parlophone UK

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Parting ways with Simon Dine, the chief collaborator on every one of the records in his great new millennial revival, Paul Weller settles into a celestial groove on Saturn's Pattern. Aligning himself with Jan "Stan" Kybert, a producer who has been in his orbit since 2002's Illumination, Weller veers left from the bright modernism of 2012's Sonik Kicks, choosing to soften his edges and expand his horizons. As the album comes crashing into view via the heavy blooze of "White Skies" -- a collaboration with neo-psychedelic pranksters Amorphous Androgynous that seems closer to Black Keys than Humble Pie and not all that trippy, either -- it doesn't seem that Saturn's Pattern would get quite so mellow, but it doesn't take long before Weller happily lets himself drift away in a haze. So spacy is Saturn's Pattern that when it circles back toward a heavier blues on "Long Time" or "In the Car," the riffs get deliberately chopped and halted in favor of the kind of spiraling, soulful harmonies that populate the rest of the record. These production twists aren't belabored: they're slid in, adding atmosphere and texture to a record that already relies on vibe. Such subliminal accents freshen Weller's longstanding obsessions with '60s soul and expansive '70s rock, turning Saturn's Pattern into something that feels nearly as modern as Sonik Kicks. When he indulges in a wash of Vox organ and a rush of 12-string guitars, or when he updates Curtis Mayfield on "Phoenix," they play like transmissions from the past on an album that is focused on the now, and the willful, harmonious collisions of history and the future give Saturn's Pattern its kick, while the warm thrum of the grooves gives it its soul. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine

Film Soundtracks - Released January 27, 2017 | Parlophone UK

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Rock - Released March 30, 2017 | Parlophone UK

Rock - Released March 30, 2017 | Parlophone UK

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Rock - Released December 18, 2015 | Parlophone UK

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Rock - Released August 11, 2017 | Parlophone UK

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Rock - Released September 22, 2017 | Parlophone UK

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Rock - Released December 4, 2015 | Parlophone UK

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Rock - Released July 24, 2015 | Parlophone UK

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Rock - Released June 29, 2007 | Parlophone UK

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Rock - Released September 25, 2015 | Parlophone UK

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Rock - Released January 1, 1994 | Island Records (The Island Def Jam Music Group / Universal Music)

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography - Sélection du Mercury Prize
Paul Weller deservedly regained his status as the Modfather with his second solo album, Wild Wood. Actually, the album is only tangentially related to mod, since Weller picks up on the classicism of his debut, adding heavy elements of pastoral British folk and Traffic-styled trippiness. Add to that a yearning introspection and a clean production that nevertheless feels a little rustic, even homemade, and the result is his first true masterwork since ending the Jam. The great irony of the record is that many of the songs -- "Has My Fire Really Gone Out?," "Can You Heal Us (Holy Man)" -- question his motivation and, as is apparent in his spirited performances, he reawakened his music by writing these searching songs. Though this isn't as adventurous as the Style Council, it succeeds on its own terms, and winds up being a great testament from an artist entering middle age. And, it helped kick off the trad rock that dominated British music during the '90s. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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Rock - Released January 1, 1998 | Universal-Island Records Ltd.

Wrapping up his contractual commitment to Go! Records, Paul Weller delivered Modern Classics: Greatest Hits, his first compilation of solo material, late in 1998. Modern Classics plays it safe, collecting all of his singles and adding a fine new song, "Brand New Start," which may not at first seem live up to its title, but eventually reveals itself to be a weightier ballad variation of the trad rock of Heavy Soul. Regrettably, the album is not sequenced in chronological order, but there was a consistency to Weller's solo work that makes the compilation hold together well. And while it certainly confirms that his solo work is easily his most conservative music to date, it also proves that it wasn't slight -- these singles are uniformly solid, whether it's the driving "Into Tomorrow," the rugged soul-pop of "Uh-Huh Oh-Yeh," the passionate "Sunflower," the ersatz ELO tribute "The Changingman," or ballads like "Broken Stones" and "Mermaids." Like Snap! and The Singular Adventures of the Style Council, Modern Classics is a testament to Weller's strength as a singles artist and a terrifically enjoyable listen in its own right. [The U.K. edition of Modern Classics included a bonus live disc, culled from various shows, which was every bit as good as Live Wood.] ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine