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Rock - Released September 14, 2018 | Parlophone UK

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As the icon of a generation, a bona fide star since his beginnings with the Jam, the Modfather has always inspired and fascinated fans, even just with his haircut! And in the year of his 60th birthday, Paul Weller is still giving his best. As always… Made up for the most part of acoustic songs, True Meanings, his 26th album (the 14th in solo), is far removed from his 2015 Saturns Pattern. Here, Weller seems to take a step back and reflect. He goes back to something extremely simple, straightforward, a floral and poetic album. As if the recording took place in a flowery meadow on a summer evening for an audience of insomniac romantics. Introspection is under way. The British artist studies the elements around him, dwells on his memories, sings a fanciful tribute to Bowie, all without omitting his distortions between jazz and soul… True Meanings in itself is a Wellerian praise of ballad. It starts nicely and slowly with a guitar theme, before being wrapped in violins and background vocals. It’s an absolute delight to hear the Modfather live up to his seventies masterpieces like English Rose and Liza Radley. Even though Bruce Foxton and Rick Buckler are no longer by his side in the studio, Paul Weller has always managed to surround himself with talent, as illustrated by the guests on True Meanings: Rod Argent from the Zombies (The Soul Searchers), Lucy Rose (Books), Tom Doyle (Movin On) and even a small appearance of Noel Gallagher on White Horses… A calm, laidback voice that fits perfectly with the few compositions of songwriter Erland Cooper from the band Erland and the Carnival. Two lyricists for an album that discreetly and subtly draws from genres, like this invention of a glam-rock picking ballad: Mayfly. A beautiful reference to T. Rex’s Get It On, without the glitter of course. No doubt about it, Paul Weller is a “Changingman” with delicate taste. © Clara Bismuth/Qobuz
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Rock - Released March 8, 2019 | Parlophone UK

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The 18-year-old Paul Weller who recorded the very first Jam single, In the City, in March of 1997 would probably be amused to see himself at age 59 surrounded by a large orchestra in front of a (seated) audience at the Royal Albert Hall one evening in October 2018… The life - or rather lives - of the Modfather merit a certain artistic integrity that this British rock icon has always had. For this wonderfully crafted live album, Weller focused on songs from True Meanings, his beautiful, melancholic soul-folk record released a month before the concert, which he mixes in with other tracks from The Jam (Private Hell, Tales from the Riverbank), Style Council (Have you Ever Had it Blue) and particularly from his other solo albums (Wild Wood, You do Something to Me…). Superbly arranged specifically for the concert, these versions find an organic power thanks to his warmth and sincere rapport with the London audience. This album is specially made live album for fans of the Modfather. © Max Dembo/Qobuz
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Rock - Released May 12, 2017 | Parlophone UK

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Paul Weller made a name for himself young (he was only 18 when he brought out the first Jam album, In The City, on 20 May 1977!), so his career and his discography have an unusual density. At 59, the indispensable Modfather is still going! Just as well. With A Kind Revolution, Weller offers a belligerence and a creativity that remain just as impressive even though, strictly speaking, he no longer has anything to prove. This thirteenth solo album from the man who was the brains behind the Jam and the Style Council is less experimental than its predecessor  Saturns Pattern, which sailed from Traffic to Love, via Captain Beefheart and Tame Impala... This time, Weller is getting back to rock'n'roll basics. The tone is set by Woo Sé Mama whose choirs boast two cult queens of the 60s and 70s: Madeline Bell and P.P Arnold ! Other guests come to pay homage: the great Robert Wyatt (She Moves With The Fayre), who has already worked with Weller in the past; but also, more surprisingly, Boy George, who comes in for a groovy, languorous duet (One Tear) and, on several tracks, the new guitarist from the Strypes, Josh McClorey. We can leave  Kind Revolution saying that, forty years after her career began, Paul Weller still knows how to do Paul Weller... © MZ/Qobuz
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Rock - Released September 14, 2018 | Parlophone UK

As the icon of a generation, a bona fide star since his beginnings with the Jam, the Modfather has always inspired and fascinated fans, even just with his haircut! And in the year of his 60th birthday, Paul Weller is still giving his best. As always… Made up for the most part of acoustic songs, True Meanings, his 26th album (the 14th in solo), is far removed from his 2015 Saturns Pattern. Here, Weller seems to take a step back and reflect. He goes back to something extremely simple, straightforward, a floral and poetic album. As if the recording took place in a flowery meadow on a summer evening for an audience of insomniac romantics. Introspection is under way. The British artist studies the elements around him, dwells on his memories, sings a fanciful tribute to Bowie, all without omitting his distortions between jazz and soul… True Meanings in itself is a Wellerian praise of ballad. It starts nicely and slowly with a guitar theme, before being wrapped in violins and background vocals. It’s an absolute delight to hear the Modfather live up to his seventies masterpieces like English Rose and Liza Radley. Even though Bruce Foxton and Rick Buckler are no longer by his side in the studio, Paul Weller has always managed to surround himself with talent, as illustrated by the guests on True Meanings: Rod Argent from the Zombies (The Soul Searchers), Lucy Rose (Books), Tom Doyle (Movin On) and even a small appearance of Noel Gallagher on White Horses… A calm, laidback voice that fits perfectly with the few compositions of songwriter Erland Cooper from the band Erland and the Carnival. Two lyricists for an album that discreetly and subtly draws from genres, like this invention of a glam-rock picking ballad: Mayfly. A beautiful reference to T. Rex’s Get It On, without the glitter of course. No doubt about it, Paul Weller is a “Changingman” with delicate taste. © Clara Bismuth/Qobuz

Rock - Released September 14, 2018 | Parlophone UK

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Rock - Released May 12, 2017 | Parlophone UK

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Rock - Released May 18, 2015 | Parlophone UK

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Rock - Released May 18, 2015 | Parlophone UK

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Rock - Released May 25, 2018 | Parlophone UK

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Rock - Released August 11, 2017 | Parlophone UK

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Rock - Released May 11, 2015 | Parlophone UK

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Rock - Released September 22, 2017 | Parlophone UK

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Rock - Released September 7, 2018 | Parlophone UK

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Film Soundtracks - Released March 10, 2017 | Parlophone UK

Thomas Napper's Jawbone is a British independent film about a former youth boxing champ who returns home in an effort to rebuild himself after hitting a personal low. It's a quasi-autobiographical effort from its lead actor Johnny Harris -- who also wrote the film and co-produced it -- and he's the guy who brought Paul Weller into the project. Weller has done a lot in his career, but he's never composed a soundtrack, so Jawbone is noteworthy for that reason alone, but it's also interesting because it doesn't follow conventional paths for soundtracks. Jawbone is a hybrid between long-form orchestrations, sculpted songs, and ambient soundscapes, a broad sonic panorama that also reflects many of Weller's strengths. The songs "The Ballad of Jimmy McCabe" and "Bottle" hail back to "English Rose," while "Jawbone" simmers to funky wah-wah rhythms and swaths of psychedelic guitars. These grab the attention -- the other three short selections are essentially incidental music, even "Jawbone Training" with its hyperactive hi-hats -- but the album's centerpiece is its opener, "Jimmy/Blackout," a 21-minute suite that builds from atmospheric electronics to a shimmering sung denouement from Weller. If "Jimmy/Blackout" drifts instead of commands attention, that's the point: like so many of the best soundtracks, it's mood music to be absorbed and felt, not heard. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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Rock - Released May 12, 2017 | Parlophone UK

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There's gentleness at the heart of the title A Kind Revolution, a suggestion that Paul Weller is getting softer as he approaches the age of 60. In 2017, he's still a few years away from that milestone but he's letting himself take things a little slower, absorbing the spaciness of 2015's Saturn's Pattern and reviving the sculpted soulful grooves of Wild Wood. This combination means A Kind Revolution feels straighter than any record Weller has released in the past decade -- in other words, anything he's done since he started his collaboration with Simon Dine, who acrimoniously parted after 2012's Sonik Kicks -- but where As Is Now hit hard, this has an easy touch even when the events kick off with the raver "Woo Sé Mama." This isn't the only time guitars are cranked on A Kind Revolution -- "Satellite Kid" descends into an extended jam -- but soul is Weller's guiding star on this record, leading him to the well-manicured upscale Boy George duet "One Tear" and the sharp funk of "She Moves with the Fayre," which features a cameo from Robert Wyatt. These guest appearances, particularly Wyatt's, suggest how Weller isn't content to settle into a familiar groove -- the lovely vocal harmonies on the closing "The Impossible Idea" are further indication of that -- but A Kind Revolution nevertheless feels cozy, a record designed to provide nothing but comfort and that's an unusual twist for Paul Weller. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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Rock - Released August 1, 2018 | Parlophone UK

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Rock - Released May 8, 2015 | Parlophone UK

Rock - Released September 22, 2017 | Parlophone UK

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Rock - Released February 22, 2019 | Parlophone UK

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Rock - Released February 8, 2019 | Parlophone UK

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