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Pop - Released January 1, 2010 | Paul McCartney Catalog

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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RAM

Pop - Released January 1, 2012 | Paul McCartney Catalog

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Rock - Released September 7, 2018 | Capitol Records (US1A)

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Not easy to be Paul McCartney in 2018… Anyone who listens to Egypt Station knows that at 76, the former Beatle has very little chance to deliver an album, or even just a handful of songs, that can match his masterpieces of the previous century. Sir Paul must be aware of that as well… And yet, this album hits the nail right on the head. And while his voice understandably has lost some of its haughtiness compared to his golden years, Macca is still a master at writing finely refined pop songs. After writing hundreds of them, he has no lesson to receive from anyone, but listening to Hand In Hand, Do It Now, Dominoes or Confidante, the imprints of his very singular craftsmanship shine through. And in terms of production, the Wings’ former front man was smart enough not to fall into the trap of trying to sound younger than he is. It’s indeed classicism that prevails throughout this Egypt Station, which will surely delight his die-hard fans! © Clotilde Maréchal/Qobuz
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Rock - Released June 10, 2016 | Hear Music

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RAM

Pop - Released May 22, 2012 | Paul McCartney Catalog

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Rock - Released June 20, 2018 | Capitol Records (US1A)

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Pop - Released January 1, 2011 | Paul McCartney Catalog

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Pop - Released January 1, 2012 | Paul McCartney Catalog

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Rock - Released January 1, 2019 | Capitol Records

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Rock - Released March 24, 2017 | Paul McCartney Catalog

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Rock - Released January 1, 1997 | Paul McCartney Catalog

According to Paul McCartney, working on the Beatles Anthology project inspired him to record an album that was stripped-back, immediate, and fun, one less studied and produced than most of his recent work. In many ways, Flaming Pie fulfills those goals. A largely acoustic collection of simple songs, Flaming Pie is direct and unassuming, and at its best, it recalls the homely charm of McCartney and Ram. McCartney still has a tendency to wallow in trite sentiment, and his more ambitious numbers, like the string-drenched epic "Beautiful Night" or the silly Beatlesque psychedelia of "Flaming Pie," fall a little flat. But when he works on a small scale, as on the waltzing "The Song We Were Singing," "Calico Skies," "Great Day," and "Little Willow," he's gently affecting, and the moderately rocking pop of "The World Tonight" and "Young Boy" is more ingratiating than the pair of aimless bluesy jams with Steve Miller. Even with the filler, which should be expected on any McCartney album, Flaming Pie is one of his most successful latter-day efforts, mainly because McCartney is at his best when he doesn't try so hard and lets his effortless melodic gifts rise to the surface. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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Rock - Released January 1, 2015 | Hear Music

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Rock - Released June 10, 2016 | Hear Music

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Pop - Released January 1, 2013 | Paul McCartney Catalog

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Pop - Released January 1, 2001 | Paul McCartney Catalog

For Paul McCartney, Driving Rain completes the trilogy he began with Flaming Pie, in retrospect a warm tribute to his dying wife, and continued through the storming rock & roll of Run Devil Run. The first found Macca writing some of his most affecting songs while he returned to his musical standbys -- charming folk, layered pop, and amiable rock & roll. Then, with Run Devil Run, he retreated even further, finding his love for piledriving, uncompromising rock & roll. With those two extremes, he covered the bases with everything except one important thing -- he had yet to reclaim his art pop inclinations, something he does so subtly on Driving Rain. In a sense, it's a nice blend of the self-conscious Flowers in the Dirt and the organic, natural Flaming Pie, combining the craft of the former with the attitude of the latter. As such, it sounds fresh, particularly because McCartney has teamed up with young producers and backing bands that don't just allow him to follow his muse, they're eager to chase him when he extends a song to an abnormal length with a jam. This is not the homemade charm of Ram, nor the post-Abbey Road studio trickery of Red Rose Speedway or Band on the Run, but instead a seasoned professional finding a way to fuse his various influences in a record that is as proud of its melody as it is of its elasticity. As such, it's more self-conscious than its immediate predecessor and it's a little indulgent, but in a good way. When McCartney decides to indulge himself here, it's not with whimsy but with sheer musical muscle. As the record draws to a conclusion, he hauls out a bunch of inventive, winding jams that may be a little excessive, yet they're exciting because he hasn't tried something like this in years. He's grooving on making music again, just like he did on Flaming Pie and Run Devil Run. Driving Rain may not be as coherent as Pie, nor as relentless as Devil, but it's rich, layered, ambitious, and successful. Since becoming a solo artist, Paul McCartney has never delivered three records in a row so overstuffed with imagination, melody, and enthusiasm as he has in these three albums. Let's hope he can keep the streak going next time around. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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Pop - Released May 28, 2013 | Paul McCartney Catalog

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Rock - Released January 1, 2009 | Hear Music

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Unlike its 2002 predecessor, Back in the U.S./Back in the World, Good Evening New York City doesn’t cherrypick highlights from a tour, it commemorates a specific event: the inauguration of Citi Field -- the replacement for the now-defunct Shea Stadium, where the Beatles played a legendary show in 1965 -- in the summer of 2009. The circumstances may be different -- different enough to lead to a Billy Joel cameo on “I Saw Her Standing There," the piano man returning a favor from Paul, who played at Billy’s Shea-closing shows in 2008 -- and McCartney might have two strong albums of new material to draw upon, but as an album, Good Evening New York City plays a lot like Back in the U.S. with a whopping 17 of its 35 tracks shared between the two titles. More importantly, the vibe is the same, with Macca delivering an expertly balanced and sequenced set with all the skill of the old pro that he is. Apart from the inclusion of “Mrs. Vanderbilt” and “I’m Down,” there are no surprises, either in song selection or performance, but no surprises doesn’t mean no satisfaction, and this is plenty entertaining…provided that it’s not played too close after hearing Back in the U.S. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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Rock - Released October 2, 2015 | Hear Music

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Pop - Released January 1, 1993 | Paul McCartney Catalog

Flowers in the Dirt did earn good reviews but perhaps more important was its accompanying tour, McCartney's first full-fledged world tour in years. Given the tour's enthusiastic reception, McCartney could wait until 1993 to deliver the album's proper sequel, Off the Ground. Though it isn't as consciously ambitious, Off the Ground certainly picks up where Flowers left off, as McCartney feels no shame in making an album that doesn't aim for the charts (though success would certainly be welcomed), yet is still classy, professional, and ambitious. Two key differences appear: it's a leaner production (making the midtempo numbers seem less cloying and giving the rockers real kick), and McCartney's social conscience dominates the record (which is easily his most politically active, as he rails against animal testing and pleads for world peace several times). He doesn't leave love or whimsy behind ("Biker Like an Icon" is easily his worst, most studied stab at whimsy), and he still has a pair of fine McCartney/MacManuss songs ("Mistress and Maid," "The Lovers That Never Were") to pull out. This all results in a record that has its virtues -- it's clean and direct, where many of his solo albums are diffuse and meandering, and it's serious-minded where many rely on cutesiness -- but, overall, Off the Ground feels like less than the sum of its parts, possibly because the seriousness is too studied, perhaps because the approach is a bit too stodgy. Nevertheless, this has nearly as many successful moments as Flowers in the Dirt, standing as a deliberately serious comeback record by an artist who spent too much time relying on his natural charm, and who feels no shame in overcompensating at this stage of the game. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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Pop - Released January 1, 2010 | Paul McCartney Catalog

There's no justifying, let alone explaining, Macca's disastrous 1984 film Give My Regards to Broad Street -- a nearly impenetrable "farce" involving stolen tapes, ghosts, and funny moustaches -- and the soundtrack, if anything, is even messier. With just a few exceptions, this relies on older McCartney material from Revolver to Tug of War, with one significant touch -- everything has been re-recorded. And that doesn't just mean that "Yesterday" has a new solo McCartney version, it means that he's recut songs as recent as "Ballroom Dancing" and Pipes of Peace's "So Bad." Perhaps if he reinterpreted them, this would at least be interesting, but he replicates the original recordings, down to the same solos. This would be an unmitigated disaster if it wasn't for "No More Lonely Nights," an absolutely lovely mid-tempo tune graced by a terrific David Gilmour guitar solo. Of course, he has to diminish that tune by including three versions of it (five on the CD reissue), which means that it's a much better bet to pick that up on All the Best instead of here. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine

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