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Jazz - Released January 1, 2007 | Prestige

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Bebop - Released October 20, 2017 | HighNote Records

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Jazz - Released January 1, 1975 | Savoy

Originally released by Cobblestone and later by Muse, this 1997 CD reissue from 32 Jazz features the distinctive and exploratory guitarist Pat Martino in a tribute to Wes Montgomery. Martino does not attempt to sound like Wes (although he uses octaves here and there), and only one of the six selections ("Road Song") was actually recorded by Montgomery; the tribute is more heartfelt than imitative. With the intuitive assistance of rhythm guitarist Bobby Rose, bassist Richard Davis, and drummer Billy Higgins, Martino stretches out on six selections, including a bluesy original ("The Visit"), "Footprints," and "Alone Together," always sounding like himself and pushing the boundaries of straight-ahead jazz. © Scott Yanow /TiVo
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Jazz - Released January 1, 2006 | Blue Note Records

Pat Martino and Wes Montgomery were two of the most famous guitarists to emerge out of the '60s jazz scene, an era that saw the guitar raised to the status of saxophones and trumpets. Martino and Montgomery's styles, however, were quite different, one rapid-fire post-bop, the other blues-based hard bop. This doesn't mean, however, that Martino wasn't -- like everyone else -- influenced by Montgomery. Martino's Remember: A Tribute to Wes Montgomery, then, isn't so much an album that seeks to mimic the style of another guitarist, but a loving tribute that reflects without copying Montgomery's style. Yes, Martino does pull gems from the Montgomery catalog like "Four on Six" and "West Coast Blues," and he even references his use of octaves more than once, but this is more reflective than stylistic. Martino is joined on this outing by pianist David Kikoski, bassist John Patitucci, and percussionists Scott Allan Robinson and Daniel Sadownick for solid takes on Montgomery's "Road Song," Carl Perkins' "Groove Yard," and Sam Jones' "Unit Seven." While it might be revealing to compare these and other sides to Montgomery's recordings, it's probably more fun for listeners to just allow these reinterpreted recordings to wash over them. For Martino and Montgomery fans, and for anyone who loves good guitar music, Remember is a well-conceived and executed album. © Ronnie D. Lankford, Jr. /TiVo
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Jazz - Released July 15, 2009 | Savoy

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Jazz - Released January 1, 2001 | Blue Note Records

With Live at Yoshi's, his 20th recording as a leader and third release for the Blue Note label, the legendary Pat Martino has come full circle. Accompanied by Joey DeFrancesco on Hammond B-3 and Billy Hart on drums, the hard bop and funky soul-jazz of this trio are sure to please enthusiasts of the guitar, organ, and drum trio. Martino, heir to Wes Montgomery's warm, bluesy guitar style, plays eight great compositions, including two great extended versions of the classic Miles Davis compositions "All Blues" and "Blue in Green." On "All Blues," creative guitar voice plays the melody with soulful interpretations and subtle musical resonance. Martino's version of "Blue in Green" creates a world of melancholy and the guitarist plays his guitar with the same sweet sadness as Miles did with the support of DeFrancesco's organ solo adding additional shades of emotion. The songs selected for this "live" performance recording also appear on previously recorded Martino projects, including his 1970 Desperado album and his 1998 Stone Blue CD. However, listeners now receive the benefit of having the set performance available in real time. From the sound of the audience on Live at Yoshi's, the guitar sage's head-spinning dexterity and cool tones on "Catch" are more spirited than ever, and after listening to this CD, you'll be inclined to agree. © Paula Edelstein /TiVo
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Jazz - Released January 1, 1976 | Savoy

When We'll Be Together Again was recorded in 1976, a 31-year-old Pat Martino was four years away from being operated on for the brain aneurysm that would wipe out his memory. The Philadelphia guitarist was also very much at the height of his creative powers -- a fact that's hard to miss on this excellent session, which 32 Jazz reissued on CD in 1998. Forming an intimate duo with electric pianist Gil Goldstein, Martino is at his most introspective on sparse interpretations of the standards "You Don't Know What Love Is" and "Willow Weep for Me" as well as Henry Mancini's "Dreamsville," J.J. Johnson's "Lament," and Stephen Sondheim's "Send in the Clowns." Martino's lyricism was never more personal than it is on this album, which was first released by Muse and was out of print for many years. Thankfully, We'll Be Together Again finally came out on CD when 32 Jazz reissued it in 1998. © Alex Henderson /TiVo
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Bebop - Released March 17, 2015 | HighNote Records

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Bebop - Released August 14, 2012 | HighNote Records

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Jazz - Released May 4, 2004 | Savoy

Giants of Jazz: Pat Martino is a nice budget collection of the guitarist's landmark work from the '60s and '70s. Included are such standout tracks as the ballad "We'll Be Together Again," John Coltrane's "Impressions," and the expansive "Willow." While collectors will most likely want the full-length albums, this is a solid introduction to Martino's unique oeuvre. © Matt Collar /TiVo
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Jazz - Released January 1, 1990 | Fantasy Records

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Jazz - Released October 21, 1997 | Savoy

The 32 Jazz compilation Cream collects tracks from some of guitarist Pat Martino's best albums, including Consciousness and his post-brain aneurysm 1987 comeback Return. Although 32 Jazz also reissued most of the albums these cuts come from, having them in one place makes for a nice introduction to Martino's distinctive ambient "machine gun"-like improvisational style. © Matt Collar /TiVo
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Jazz - Released January 1, 2003 | Blue Note Records

Guitarist Pat Martino has tempered his serpentine, machine-gun improvisational style over the years into a soft-focus, graph paper stencil. His playing, at once mathematically dense and puritanical in its economy, can impress with long bursts of harmonic complexity and stylistic flourishes that cross rockabilly-esque chicken scratch with ECM-style repetition. All of this is on display on his cerebral, blues-tinged 2003 album Think Tank. His third album for Blue Note since 1997's All Sides Now, it finds him paired with the equally protean talents of saxophonist Joe Lovano, pianist Gonzalo Rubalcaba, bassist Christian McBride, and drummer Lewis Nash. Together, they play with a thoughtful intensity that's both meditative and exploding with improvisational ideas. Lovano is an especially intuitive foil for the guitarist with a floating, kinetic style that's well-suited to these flowing compositions. They both spiral through the title song, an intriguing scientific theorem of a tune that Martino built out of the letters in John Coltrane's name. The track, as with much of Think Tank, finds them dancing around drummer Lewis Nash's ever-present swinging groove and bassist Christian McBride's funky drones. Equally engaging is the ballad "Sun on My Hands," in which pianist Gonzalo Rubalcaba and Martino delicately play off each other in a kind of plaintive call-and-response that brings to mind Martino's dusky, reflective 1976 album We'll Be Together Again. Elsewhere, Martino offers up the sinister, Middle Eastern-tinged modality of "Africa," the driving post-bop exuberance of "Earthlings," and the sun-dappled haze of "Before You Ask." Think Tank is a deep album, but never cold. © Matt Collar /TiVo
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Jazz - Released June 7, 2005 | Savoy

Impressions collects tracks from four of guitarist Pat Martino's best Muse albums from the '70s, including 1974's Consciousness, 1975's Footprints, 1976's We'll Be Together Again, and 1977's Exit. From Martino's most well-known and perhaps most creative period, these albums found the technically deft musician tackling everything from American popular song to jazz standards and his own superb original compositions. Completists will most likely want to seek out the original albums, but as an introduction to Martino's work, Impressions is as good a place to start as any. © Matt Collar /TiVo
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Jazz - Released January 1, 1997 | Blue Note Records

Veteran Pat Martino is teamed up with a variety of different fellow guitarists on this interesting if not quite essential release. Martino matches wits with guitarist Charlie Hunter (who on Stevie Wonder's "Too High" often sounds like an organist), Tuck Andress, Kevin Eubanks, Les Paul ("I'm Confessin'"), Mike Stern and Michael Hedges. In addition, Cassandra Wilson sings Joni Mitchell's "Both Sides Now" accompanied by Martino, and rock guitarist Joe Satriani tries to sit in on two numbers (with indifferent results). A decent effort, but not up to Pat Martino's most significant releases. © Scott Yanow /TiVo
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Jazz - Released February 8, 2005 | Rhino - Warner Records

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Jazz - Released January 1, 1998 | Blue Note Records

The guitar master is at it again on this collection of original tunes. Mixing up bop and funk with heavy doses of pop, he offers up a very listenable album with lots of character. Standout tracks include the fat beat of "Mac Tough" and the evocative "With All The People." © Tim Sheridan /TiVo
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Jazz - Released February 28, 2012 | Rhino - Warner Records

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Jazz - Released March 14, 2000 | Savoy

32 Jazz launched a retrospective series called Giving Away the Store. These are gateway recordings to an artist's entire catalog. Volume 3 is an introduction to Pat Martino. Jazz guitarist Martino is a technical virtuoso capable of great emotional expression. As with other recordings in the Giving Away the Store collection, this album serves as an excellent introduction for the uninitiated or a representative sampler for the knowledgeable fan. © Tom Schulte /TiVo
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Jazz - Released January 1, 1989 | Fantasy Records

Pat Martino's fourth of five Prestige albums contains plenty of intriguing music. The innovative guitarist is joined by Bobby Rose on second guitar, Gregory Herbert on alto and flute (making his recording debut), bassist Richard Davis, drummer Charlie Persip, Reggie Ferguson on tabla, and Balakrishna on tamboura. Together they perform Martino's four-part suite, whose sections are named after aspects of the Koran. The use of Indian instruments, drones, and unusual time signatures (including 7/4, 9/4, and 10/8) gives the performances the flavor of early fusion, and some of the effects sound a bit dated. However, the results were not overtly commercial, and the leader gets in several noteworthy improvisations. © Scott Yanow /TiVo