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Pop - Released January 8, 2021 | Nettwerk Records

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Passenger's 13th studio album, 2021's Songs for the Drunk and Broken Hearted, finds singer/songwriter Mike Rosenberg drawing upon his varied pop influences while again showcasing his textured vocals and knack for yearning folk melodies. Recorded at his own Black Crow Studios in Brighton, England, the album arrives on the heels of his intimate 2020 acoustic LP Patchwork, which he recorded while in lockdown during the COVID-19 pandemic. Interestingly, Rosenberg actually recorded Songs for the Drunk and Broken Hearted prior to Patchwork and in the wake of the end of a relationship. Subsequently, there's a cathartic, soul-searching quality to the album that feels as if Rosenberg is working through his emotions over the breakup. The opening "Sword from a Stone," which he also included a different version of on Patchwork, seems to speak directly to his post-breakup state of mind. He sings, "How you feeling, sweetheart?/Are you moving on?/Are you sleeping okay/Or do the nights go on and on?/I hope you're eating well/I hope you're staying strong/'Cause I'm fine, then I'm not." However, while heartbreak is at the core of the album, the songs never get too depressing as Rosenberg strikes a balance between folky introspection and buoyant pop melodicism. Cuts like "Tip of My Tongue" and "Remember to Forget" have a classic folk-rock quality, bringing to mind the work of bands like the Byrds and Badfinger. Conversely, the minor-key arpeggios that kick off "What You're Waiting For" are prime '80s Johnny Marr, evoking the guitarist's early work with the Smiths. Equally evocative is the languid "London in Spring," a poignant chamber ballad, replete with strings and horns, that sounds like something Donovan or Harry Chapin might have recorded in the late '60s. With Songs for the Drunk and Broken Hearted, Passenger has crafted artful, hooky anthems that stick with you in the way the best pop songs often do. © Matt Collar /TiVo
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Alternative & Indie - Released February 17, 2013 | Nettwerk Records

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All the Little Lights, the third long-player from Mike Rosenberg, better known as the founder, vocalist, songwriter, and driving force behind English folk-rock outfit Passenger, continues in the vein of 2010's Flight of the Crow, offering up another evocative collection of heartfelt, largely acoustic, indie folk gems that invoke names like Coldplay, Van Morrison, Villagers, Mumford & Sons, and even Neil Young. Recorded once again in Australia, All the Little Lights represents an evolution in both Rosenberg's songwriting and his overall sound, maintaining the emotional intimacy of his previous outings while introducing a bigger and bolder production style. © TiVo
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Pop - Released September 23, 2016 | Nettwerk Records

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Pop - Released August 31, 2018 | Nettwerk Records

Singer/songwriter Mike Rosenberg, aka Passenger, celebrates his American roots and embraces a twangy, wide-ranging sound in the process on his 2018 album, Runaway. Although born in Brighton, England, Rosenberg, whose father was originally from New Jersey (his mother is British), grew up with a strong emotional connection to the States. Consequently, he's as influenced by artists like Ireland's Van Morrison as he is Arizona's Calexico. The album, which follows up his equally outdoorsy Young as the Morning Old as the Sea and acoustic album The Boy Who Cried Wolf, finds Rosenberg bridging his transatlantic inspirations, digging even deeper into his eclectic folk-rock sound. Whereas last time Rosenberg and longtime producer Chris Vallejo dressed his yearning, melodic anthems in orchestral flourishes, here they take a rootsier approach, weaving in banjo on "Hell or High Water," pedal steel on "Let's Go," and tube amp-laden electric guitar on "Heart to Love." There's even warm mariachi-style brass on the title track. However, for fans of Passenger's more baroque, British-sounding productions, Rosenberg still makes room for intimate moments like his acoustic-guitar-and-string-section ballad "Ghost Town" and the similarly ruminative piano-based number "To Be Free." The latter track is also explicitly biographical, detailing his parents' story, and how their meeting has led him on his own journey. He sings "Now here I am, 33 years old, 2017/I've seen the Rhineland/I've been to Vineland/I'm a feather on the breeze." Ultimately, it's that openhearted sense of discovery and road-going on Runaway that sticks with you. It's as if Rosenberg is taking you along with him on his cross-country road trip, in a car with the windows rolled all the way down. © Matt Collar /TiVo
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Alternative & Indie - Released June 10, 2014 | Nettwerk Records

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Metal - Released July 13, 2003 | Century Media

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Pop - Released June 29, 2012 | Nettwerk Records

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Pop - Released September 23, 2016 | Nettwerk Records

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Pop - Released March 20, 2020 | Nettwerk Records

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Pop - Released September 23, 2016 | Nettwerk Records

Passenger's eighth studio album, 2016's Young as the Morning Old as the Sea, is a lushly produced album rife with subtle melodies and lyrics that reveal singer/songwriter Mike Rosenberg's soul-scratching itch to wander windswept rural landscapes. While Young as the Morning Old as the Sea follows on the heels of his stripped-down 2015 effort, Whispers II, given Rosenberg's use of orchestral arrangements and varied instrumentation from organ and trumpet to lap steel guitar, the album has more in common with 2014's Whispers. As on that album, Rosenberg here pairs with producer Chris Vallejo, a longtime collaborator. Together, they decamped to Neil Finn's Roundhead Studios in Auckland and, later, Linear Studios in Sydney to capture these nuanced, often delicately rendered compositions. Once again, the primary focus with Passenger is Rosenberg's folky, poetic, acoustic guitar-based songs built around his idiosyncratic voice. It's a distinctive combination that brings to mind the fantastical combination of an elfin troubadour and Van Morrison, as well as more grounded comparisons like Amos Lee minus the R&B influence or Brett Dennen with the Southern twang replaced by a British lilt. An air of wanderlust and a celebration of the life-renewing power of nature pervade the album. As Rosenberg sings on the title track, "I wanna feel a Russian winter/I wanna go to my Polish grandmother's home/I wanna see Hungarian lanterns/I wanna walk on a road that leads to Rome/I wanna be free as the wind that blows past me." And while there is a palpable joy in many of these songs, there is also a bittersweet quality, as if Rosenberg has been through a breakup or other loss. It's a tone he strikes best on his gossamer, Elizabethan-tinged duet with U.K. folk siren Birdy, "Beautiful Birds." They sing, "One day you asked for a different song/One that I just couldn't sing/I got the melody sharp and the words all wrong/Those were the last days of spring." Certainly, there are hooky, anthemic moments on Young as the Morning Old as the Sea, including the rambling, waltz-like "If You Go" and the rousing, declaratively romantic "Anywhere," both of which bring to mind a pleasing mix of Mumford & Sons and the Beautiful South. That said, these are deeply thoughtful and sophisticated songs that may take more than one listen to truly appreciate. Ultimately, with Young as the Morning Old as the Sea, Passenger has crafted an album that, not unlike the oceans, fields, roads, and relationships that inspired it, remains with you, calling you to return. © Matt Collar /TiVo
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Pop - Released May 1, 2020 | Nettwerk Records

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Pop - Released March 1, 2019 | Nettwerk Records

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Folk/Americana - Released June 12, 2012 | Nettwerk Records

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Alternative & Indie - Released June 10, 2014 | Nettwerk Records

British singer/songwriter Mike Rosenberg, otherwise known as Passenger, continues exploring the broader sonic palette he developed on 2012's All the Little Lights with his sixth studio album, 2014's Whispers. As he did last time, Rosenberg once again teamed up with All the Little Lights producer Chris Vallejo. Together, they deliver a batch of evocative acoustic folk and indie pop songs that are often expanded with orchestral flourishes. That said, Rosenberg's main instrument of choice here is still the acoustic guitar, and all the songs on Whispers retain the Brighton-based artist's core intimacy. Influenced by both traditional British folk and more modern singer/songwriters, Rosenberg's work here falls somewhere between the earnest classicism of Mumford & Sons and the contemporary pop of Ed Sheeran. Vocally, he has a distinctively poignant chirp of a voice that sounds something akin to an elf who stayed up all night smoking, drinking, and sharing stories with friends. Which isn't to say he sounds wizened, just world-weary and steeped in a kind of twee ennui. Whether he's singing about growing older ("27") or delving into a poetic allegory about loneliness ("Bullets"), Rosenberg has a knack for intimate revelations that still read as universal. He also has a gift for melody, and cuts like the melancholy "Heart's on Fire" and the similarly hushed "Rolling Stone," with its Van Morrison-esque woodwind backgrounds, are pleasantly enjoyable songs, perfect for introspective listening on warm summer afternoons. Ultimately, with Whispers, Rosenberg has crafted an album of sweet, hummable anthems for tender-hearted troubadours everywhere. © Matt Collar /TiVo
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Alternative & Indie - Released June 13, 2014 | Nettwerk Records

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Pop - Released June 17, 2016 | Nettwerk Records

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Pop - Released October 23, 2020 | Nettwerk Records

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Passenger's 13th studio album, 2021's Songs for the Drunk and Broken Hearted, finds singer/songwriter Mike Rosenberg drawing upon his varied pop influences while again showcasing his textured vocals and knack for yearning folk melodies. Recorded at his own Black Crow Studios in Brighton, England, the album arrives on the heels of his intimate 2020 acoustic LP Patchwork, which he recorded while in lockdown during the COVID-19 pandemic. Interestingly, Rosenberg actually recorded Songs for the Drunk and Broken Hearted prior to Patchwork and in the wake of the end of a relationship. Subsequently, there's a cathartic, soul-searching quality to the album that feels as if Rosenberg is working through his emotions over the breakup. The opening "Sword from a Stone," which he also included a different version of on Patchwork, seems to speak directly to his post-breakup state of mind. He sings, "How you feeling, sweetheart?/Are you moving on?/Are you sleeping okay/Or do the nights go on and on?/I hope you're eating well/I hope you're staying strong/'Cause I'm fine, then I'm not." However, while heartbreak is at the core of the album, the songs never get too depressing as Rosenberg strikes a balance between folky introspection and buoyant pop melodicism. Cuts like "Tip of My Tongue" and "Remember to Forget" have a classic folk-rock quality, bringing to mind the work of bands like the Byrds and Badfinger. Conversely, the minor-key arpeggios that kick off "What You're Waiting For" are prime '80s Johnny Marr, evoking the guitarist's early work with the Smiths. Equally evocative is the languid "London in Spring," a poignant chamber ballad, replete with strings and horns, that sounds like something Donovan or Harry Chapin might have recorded in the late '60s. With Songs for the Drunk and Broken Hearted, Passenger has crafted artful, hooky anthems that stick with you in the way the best pop songs often do. © Matt Collar /TiVo
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Folk/Americana - Released January 1, 1998 | Passenger

Admirably, In Flames vocalist Anders Friden and his compadres in Passenger (all of whom also come from extreme metal backgrounds and had begun to feel shackled by the limitations of the genre) attempt to apply their combined musical muscle to a more melodic formula, drawing equal inspiration from Helmet and Depeche Mode. Generally they succeed. The drop-tuned crunch of their death metal guitars is sweetened by a carefully polished production style, unabashed use of vocal harmonies, and the occasional dark burble of synthesizer sequences, while Friden unsurprisingly explores various shades of melancholy and anguish. Perhaps it's not the most original idea to come down the pike (the Deftones, Korn, and their myriad imitators have been mining a similar vein for years), but here it works because for the most part, the songs are strong and memorable, and the performances are inspired. On the weaker cuts, Passenger sounds all too familiar, indistinguishable from the dozens of cookie-cutter tantrum rockers that populate the American rock airwaves. © Andy Hinds /TiVo
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Pop - Released May 22, 2020 | Nettwerk Records

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Pop - Released April 10, 2020 | Nettwerk Records

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