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Pop - Released November 9, 2018 | BMG Rights Mgmt Italy S.R.L.

Pop - Released July 1, 2016 | Universal Music Italia srL.

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As Paolo Conte entered his third active decade as a solo artist, his discography went the same way as those of other Italian songwriters such as Francesco De Gregori, he systematically alternated studio albums with live releases and compilations. Still, considering the significant jazz component of his music and the excellent musicianship of his collaborators, Conte's live albums will always hold enough interest, even for those familiar with his studio work. Tournée documents Conte's European tours between 1991 and 1993, and it was recorded in Hamburg, Brussels, Wien, Den Haag, Valencia, Monte Carlo, Enschede, and Paris -- anywhere but in Italy, in fact. The generous 18-track repertoire draws strongly from 1984's Paolo Conte and 1990's Parole d'amore Scritte a Macchina (curiously, nothing from his last album, 1992's 900, is included), and it wisely favors the more upbeat, swinging material rather than the ballads -- Conte's albums usually feature half of each. Conte's band is mostly made up of the same sessionists that gave a distinctive flavor to his '90s albums, among them the rhythm section of bassist Jino Touche and drummer Daniele Di Gregorio, as well as guitarist Danny Piri, and multi-instrumentalist Max Pitzianti. The female background singer quartet of Ginger Brew, Rama Brew, Maria Short, and Julie Brennan deserves special mention, as they positively shine throughout this album, especially on the closer "Bye, Music." This is one of three new songs included in Tournée, together with the instrumental opening "Ouverture Alla Russa," and the French-sung "Rêveries." All three are impressive additions to the Conte canon, and a further incentive to seek out this fine collection. A companion piece to this record, the double-CD Tournée, Vol. 2, was released in 1998, featuring performances of songs that had never previously appeared in any other Paolo Conte live album. © Mariano Prunes /TiVo

Pop - Released March 15, 1985 | WM Italy

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This first Paolo Conte live collection is an ideal introduction to one of Italy's most unique performers. Recorded both in Italy and in France, a testimony to Conte's established transnational appeal, this recording constitutes an excellent summary of the first decade of his career. Although he only gathered the courage to start his solo career after working ten years as a professional songwriter, Conte is a natural showman and his music, with its strong music hall influences, is clearly made for the stage. Always a perfectionist, for this outing Conte surrounds himself with a cadre of Italy's finest sessionmen: bassist Ares Tavolazzi, drummer Ellade Bandini, guitarist Jimmy Villoti, saxophonist and bandleader Antonio Marangolo, and keyboardist Mimmo Turone. All of the above (plus producer Renzo Fantini) had frequently contributed to Conte's studio recordings and were thus perfectly in synch with his musical vision. Appropriately, the husky vocalist-stomping pianist and his band never miss a step, as they positively enjoy themselves nonchalantly breezing through 18 classics from the Conte repertoire. All of his best-known songs are here, including "Genova per Noi," "Via con Me," "Bartali," "Un Gelato al Limon," "La Topolino Amaranto," and "Onda su Onda." As a bonus, there is also the first appearance on a Conte album of "Azzurro," a 1968 hit for Adriano Celentano written by Conte and Vito Pallavicini. As an introduction to the artist, Concerti, or any other Conte live album, is arguably better than a greatest-hits package and, in fact, this record functioned as such until the first official Paolo Conte compilation appeared in 1992. The only caveat with Concerti has to do with its compact disc edition, since the sound of the 1989 digitally mastering is rather dim. In addition, this album was originally released as a double long-player, and the CD version loses two great tracks, "Sono Qui con Te Sempre Più Solo," and "Dal Loggione." © Mariano Prunes /TiVo

Pop - Released July 1, 2016 | Universal Music Italia srL.

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Pop - Released October 6, 1987 | WM Italy

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International Pop - Released June 30, 1996 | RCA Records Label

Pop - Released July 1, 2016 | Universal Music Italia srL.

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Jazz - Released October 21, 2016 | Universal Music Italia srL.

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International Pop - Released January 1, 1981 | RCA Records Label

By the time of his fourth album, Paris Milonga, Paolo Conte had perfectly defined his musical vision and stage persona, a mixture of weary seen-it-all cabaret piano player, humorous portraitist, and late-night philosopher. Alone at his piano or backed up by a small jazz ensemble, through melancholic ballads, stomping boogies, or sensual Latin rhythms, Conte goes over his usual repertoire of tired, slow burning, middle-age affairs and musings on the life of nightclub musicians and regulars. Conte is in spectacular form in Paris Milonga, a record that features at least four of his classics: "Alle Prese con una Verde Milonga," an homage to both anonymous musicians and to legendary Argentinean composer Atahualpa Yupanqui; "Parigi," that does for Paris what "Genova per Noi" did for Genoa; "Via con Me," arguably Conte's most famous song, soon adopted by Roberto Benigni for his standup comedy show, and "Boogie," a catalog of nightclub types and mating rituals that implausibly manages to be both hilarious and sexy. It matters little that, for instance, "Boogie" and "Via con Me" are essentially the same song with somewhat different lyrics. Conte's eye has seldom been this funny and poetic at the same time. He can do no wrong in Paris Milonga, as he sits back against his familiar jazzy grooves and delivers one memorable line after another (such as "I was looking for a woman and I found myself a comic opera"), in his ineffable detached style. A great album and a terrific introduction to one of Italy's best loved and most unique performers. © Mariano Prunes /TiVo
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Italy - Released November 3, 2017 | Sony Music - BMG Rights Management

Pop - Released October 27, 2017 | Universal Music Italia srL.

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Pop - Released July 1, 2016 | Universal Music Italia srL.

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Italy - Released February 6, 1989 | Sony Music - BMG Rights Management

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Pop - Released January 1, 2008 | Universal Music Italia srL.

Psiche is the 13th studio album of Paolo Conte's 35-year career. Not exactly prolific, the former lawyer from Asti built an outstanding body of work between 1974 and 1990, but recorded sporadically after that. Like João Gilberto or Jimmy Scott, Conte is one of those artists who very early on created a unique style and persona, and never strayed too far from with it. Psiche thus resembles all of Conte's releases since 1992's 900: a set of 15 unimpeachable new songs that perpetuate the myth of Paolo Conte, but add little to it. This is not necessarily a bad thing, and Psiche is indeed a fine album. True, some may write off this record as an exercise in style. Yet style has always been exactly Conte's forte, and no one can possibly deny that he has it in spades. Old themes and characters are revisited (the theater, dancing, bicycle racing, fascinating women, European culture, American swing) and set to Conte's trademark smoky jazz ballad treatment. Perhaps the most distinctive element of Psiche is the abundant use of synthesizer sounds ("Il Quadrato e il Cerchio," "Bella di Giorno," "Omicron"), particularly as it comes on the wake of the acoustic return-to-roots implied on Elegia, Conte's superb 2004 album. The results, if not as individually memorable as those of the preceding album, give Psiche a sonic identity of its own that grows with the record. He may be past 70 and starting to show in his voice, but Paolo Conte remains a class act. © Mariano Prunes /TiVo
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International Pop - Released January 1, 1974 | RCA Records Label

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International Pop - Released January 1, 1979 | RCA Records Label

While his first two superb albums, released in 1974 and 1975, failed to gain widespread popularity for Paolo Conte, his reputation among Italian songwriters kept growing steadily. In the meantime, Conte spent four years away from his solo career concentrating on other projects, but finally made the third time lucky with 1979's Un Gelato al Limon. The album's success was undoubtedly boosted when Lucio Dalla and Francesco de Gregori performed the title track in their mega-tour, as documented by the subsequent live album Banana Republic. The same year, Enzo Janacci included two other Conte originals from Un Gelato al Limon on his album Fotoricordo. Musically or lyrically, there is little in Un Gelato al Limon (or in almost any other Paolo Conte album, for that matter) that was not already present in the first two records. In fact, the new batch of material is, if anything, less consistently excellent than those of the previous releases. Several of the songs feel like rewrites of older ones, something that would become a constant in Conte's career. This is perhaps hardly avoidable for a songwriter like Conte, who has always concentrated on a fixed set of themes and characters, such as provincial bourgeois boredom and vaudeville artists, and the particular world they inhabit. At any rate, any Paolo Conte effort is a most enjoyable affair, and Un Gelato al Limon is no exception. Two of his best-known songs are here, the title track and "Bartali," two trademark Conte snapshots of watching life passing by through the slow Italian summer, with its scant spectacles and consolations -- a fleeting (probably illicit) love affair and bicycle racing, respectively. Another colpo di genio is "Dal Loggione," one of those Conte songs about the love of music, a subject that allows him to sound more genuinely sincere than steeped in character, as is usually the case. As if to signal his entrance into star status, Un Gelato al Limon is the first Paolo Conte album to feature his photograph on the cover. Of course, he is shown against the darkened stage of a shabby nightclub, with the locale's bar counter featured on the back cover. A man and his world, indeed. © Mariano Prunes /TiVo

Pop - Released November 28, 2011 | Universal Music Italia srL.

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As compilation packages go, this new release by the great Paolo Conte is rather hard to figure out. Allegedly, selections were handpicked by Conte, who thought nothing of choosing as many as five songs from his personal favorite, Una Faccia in Prestito (1995), a fine effort on its own right but nowhere near masterpieces such as the double album Aguaplano or his first two self-titled records, all conspicuously absent here. In fact, none of Conte's '70s albums made the cut, even if many of his career-defining songs are to be found there. Perhaps this was done in order to avoid overlapping Conte's previous compilation, the international big-seller The Best of Paolo Conte (1996). Even so, Gong-Oh repeats seven tracks from that compilation; tellingly, the only four tracks from his '80s albums included here were already present in The Best of Paolo Conte. In short, this compilation features next to nothing from Conte's classic '70s and '80s output, so there is no way it can be considered a comprehensive overview of his career. One suspects that the initial concept behind Gong-Oh was to offer a collection of Conte's best work in the '90s and 2000s -- which would have been a fine idea, indeed, and a perfect complement to the previous compilation -- but that fear of not including any of the big hits crept in, concessions were made, and in the end Gong-Oh included almost half of The Best of Paolo Conte, plus an unbalanced selection from Conte's most recent work. In order to sweeten the pot, the CD is bookended by two previously unreleased recordings: the new song "La Musica è Pagana," which recalls the electronic touches of 2008's Psiche, and a new arrangement of Conte's signature song, "Via con Me," made for a TV advert. There is of course nothing wrong with any of the dazzling 19 tracks on Gong-Oh, as Conte's consistency in terms of style and excellence has been awe-inspiring, titanium-solid through the years. Yet, as it lacks validity as a compilation, it cannot be recommended over any of his typically fine latter-day releases, such as the wonderfully minimalist Elegia (2004), not to mention his superb live albums. © Mariano Prunes /TiVo
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Pop - Released March 30, 2012 | Nar International

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International Pop - Released January 1, 1975 | Ariola

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International Pop - Released January 1, 1975 | RCA Records Label