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Classical - Released September 15, 2014 | Erato - Warner Classics

Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or de l'année - Diapason d'or - 4F de Télérama - Le Choix de France Musique - Choc de Classica
Henri Dutilleux was a perfectionist, famous for his careful revisions of his comparatively small output, and his orchestral music demonstrates his meticulous attention to sonorities and textures. The three works on this 2015 Erato CD are fine examples of Dutilleux's craft, drawn from three periods of his long career, yet all consistently show his thorough mastery of the orchestra. Despite its modernity, the Symphony No. 1 (1951) is clearly traditional in its four-movement structure and procedures, yet most listeners will be drawn to its strong neo-Classical flavor, its wide range of tone colors, and its varied moods. Somewhat more abstruse in method is Métaboles (1965), which at times has a sharp-edged brittleness, yet the music also reveals a deep lyricism and a sense of lush textures not found in the avant-garde music of the time. Sur le même accord (2002) is a nocturne for violin and orchestra that seems rather like a slow movement from a concerto, because the soloist's part is challenging, and the range of expression is much greater than the title nocturne would suggest. These performances by Paavo Järvi and the Orchestre de Paris, featuring violinist Christian Tetzlaff, were recorded live at the Salle Pleyel in Paris, ostensibly for radio broadcast, and the sound is clear and relatively noise-free, though one might wish that these many-layered pieces could be heard in a spacious studio recording with multichannel reproduction. © TiVo
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Classical - Released September 27, 2019 | Alpha

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or - 4F de Télérama
Paavo Järvi inaugurates his new contract as conductor of the Tonhalle Orchestra in Zurich with a programme devoted to Messiaen. Alpha Classics will accompany this extremely promising combination: ‘I’ve always admired French music very much. (...) I think Messiaen is the most original voice, someone absolutely unique. You need only listen for three seconds to a work by Messiaen to be sure that it is by him. His style is so clear, so unmistakable. In his two early works Les Offrandes oubliées and Le Tombeau resplendissant, religion and mysticism play an important role. If you listen carefully, you will notice how a harmony is continually transformed, so that you can never predict what sound will come next. But Messiaen’s harmonic language is not experimental: it produces an inevitable meaning, and you get the feeling that the chord sequence can be that way and no other. Music is a language of its own; music begins where words leave off.’ (Excerpt from an interview with Paavo Järvi) © Alpha Classics
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Classical - Released March 13, 2020 | Alpha

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or - 5 étoiles de Classica
Erkki-Sven Tüür, born in Estonia in 1959, writes music that is characterised by intense energetic transformation. The intuitive and rational approach is synthesised into a complete organic system. He is the composer of nine symphonies, ten concertos, numerous chamber works and an opera. Dedicated to his compatriot Paavo Järvi and composed to mark the centenary of the Estonian Republic in 2018, Tüür’s Ninth Symphony is entitled "Mythos". According to the composer, this refers to the myths that arise about nations and how they have acquired their independence, and also deals with the long history of the Finno-Ugric peoples. Paavo Järvi and his Estonian Festival Orchestra have made the world premiere recording of this work, along with The Incantation of Tempest (2004), dedicated to the Estonian composer Veljo Tormis, and Sow the Wind, composed in 2015, inspired by climatic ‘gusts of wind’ and ‘whirlwinds’. © Alpha Classics
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Symphonic Music - Released June 1, 2012 | RCA Red Seal

Distinctions 5 de Diapason - Choc de Classica
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Symphonic Music - Released January 9, 2015 | RCA Red Seal

Distinctions Diapason d'or de l'année - Diapason d'or
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Classical - Released October 23, 2015 | Sony Music Japan International

Distinctions Diapason d'or de l'année - Diapason d'or
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Symphonies - Released September 11, 2020 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or
The music of composer Franz Schmidt fell out of the repertory after it emerged that he had been hailed by the Nazis, although he apparently never asked for the honor and was less than comfortable with it. His essentially conservative style put him out of commission for several more decades during the period of modernist repression, but there have been modest signs of a revival, including a complete cycle from conductor Neeme Järvi, leading the Chicago and Detroit Symphony Orchestras (not yet heard by this writer). Now his son Paavo weighs in with this set, leading the Frankfurt Radio Symphony Orchestra. The music will be new to most listeners, and it's attractive stuff. Its most striking feature is a radiant, optimistic tone, defined right from the first movement of the Symphony No. 1 in E major. Järvi grabs the listener's attention here and doesn't release across substantial movements that are mostly between ten and 20 minutes long. A place to start sampling would be the entr'acte, an Intermezzo from the opera Notre Dame, which exemplifies the almost mystical tone Schmidt's music retained, even amid great personal tragedy. That tragedy is explicitly addressed in Schmidt's Symphony No. 4 in C major, designed "a requiem for my daughter" by the composer; the daughter died in childbirth in 1932. That work is perhaps the most Straussian of Schmidt's symphonies with its transfigured trumpet theme at the beginning and end, but Schmidt's style, although certainly conservative by the 1930s, was not derivative of anybody. It is not so much a matter of tonality, where he is, like Mahler, sometimes pushing the edges and, at other times, innocently diatonic. Instead, it is the historical scope of his music, encompassing styles as far back as Schubert (hear the echoes of the "Great" Symphony No. 9 in C major, D. 944) in the Symphony No. 3 in A major, while living very much in the world of Strauss and Bruckner overall. Järvi and the Frankfurt Radio Symphony catch the energy in the music and display no weaknesses over a very large orchestra in these live recordings. It seems possible that this release will expand the big symphonic repertory a bit. Try the music out and speculate on this possibility. © TiVo
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Symphonies - Released January 18, 2019 | Sony Music Labels Inc.

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
Estonian conductor Paavo Järvi has recorded a lot of Sibelius: there are at least a couple of complete symphony sets as well as single recordings. In general, he has tended toward the abstract, toward the view that Sibelius, despite his adherence to tonality, was essentially a modern composer with a unique conception of form on both the small and large scales. Consider the finale of the Symphony No. 5 in E flat major, Op. 82, with its popular half-note theme of open fifths and sixths. It's been thought to evoke anything from Thor's hammer to swans taking flight, but here the epic quality of the motif is toned down, and what emerges instead is the depth to which the fifths and sixths are all over this finale. Järvi's recordings of all three of the final symphonies are masterful, and the one-movement Symphony No. 7 in C major, Op. 105 unfolds with an organic inevitability that's mysterious and miraculous. Perhaps Järvi's approach is a little less desirable in the Symphony No. 1 in E minor, Op. 39, a genuinely Tchaikovskian work that is a bit drained of sentiment here, or in the Symphony No. 4 in A minor, Op. 63, which lacks the requisite gloom in this darkest of all symphonies. But the Second and Third symphonies have sweeping power, and the Orchestre de Paris is precise and sharp throughout. The Eiffel Tower on the cover does not exactly say Sibelius, but Järvi conducted this orchestra for several years, and it responds to his every wish. Your mileage may vary, for these readings are toward one extreme in the interpretation of Sibelius, but many will find the last three symphonies to be capstones of Järvi's Sibelius career -- unless he returns to Sibelius again. © TiVo
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Classical - Released November 1, 2002 | Warner Classics

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Classical - Released January 31, 2020 | Sony Music Labels Inc.

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
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Classical - Released March 29, 2019 | Sony Music Labels Inc.

Distinctions 5 Sterne Fono Forum Klassik
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Classical - Released June 7, 2004 | Warner Classics

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Classical - Released October 4, 2011 | CSO Media

Distinctions Diapason d'or
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Classical - Released January 4, 2011 | CSO Media

Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
With the demise of its longtime home, the Telarc label, the Cincinnati Symphony has decided to go it alone with its own Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra Media label. On Telarc the orchestra was known for splashy audiophile recordings of symphonic favorites, and the graphics here, with American flag and the American Portraits title, might lead you to expect a group of patriotic favorites, perhaps including Copland's Lincoln Portrait. But look more closely: this is an innovative release by the orchestra and outgoing music director Paavo Järvi, featuring contemporary music. The only composer who is anything close to a household name is Pulitzer Prize winner Jennifer Higdon, represented by a vigorous Fanfare Ritmico. All the music has been previously performed; this represents Järvi's effort to identify music that might stand up to repeat performances. Much of it is programmatic, and perhaps the most pleasing of the bunch in Michigan composer Carter Pann's SLALOM, explicitly designated as "a taste of the thrill of downhill skiing." It opens with the timpani strokes of the Scherzo of Beethoven's Symphony No. 9 in D minor, Op. 125, and, according to the composer, lasts "precisely the amount of time I need to get from Storm Peak (the peak of Mount Werner, Steamboat Springs) to the mountain base." The two works by Cincinnati Symphony-associated composer Charles Coleman are both representational; Deep Woods is inspired and closely connected to a painting by Charles Yoder. Jonathan Bailey Holland's Halcyon Sun is a mood piece commissioned for the opening of Cincinnati's National Underground Railroad Freedom Center. Only Higdon's piece and Kevin Puts' lightly minimalist Network are more abstract. Will releases like this stimulate the creation of an established repertoire of contemporary American works? There are promising signs here, and Järvi and the CSO are to be commended for realizing that you'll never know until you try. © TiVo
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Classical - Released August 21, 2015 | RCA Red Seal

Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
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Classical - Released August 21, 2015 | RCA Red Seal

Booklet Distinctions 5 Sterne Fono Forum Klassik
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Symphonic Music - Released October 28, 2011 | Sony Music Japan International

Distinctions 5 de Diapason
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Classical - Released January 31, 2020 | Sony Music Labels Inc.

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Classical - Released February 7, 2020 | Sony Music Labels Inc.

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Classical - Released January 31, 2020 | Sony Music Labels Inc.

Hi-Res Booklet