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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released October 26, 2018 | Rhymesayers

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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released January 27, 2017 | Doomtree Records, LLC

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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released October 22, 2012 | Rhymesayers

The idea of "punk rap" rarely feels as real and needed as it does when the twitchy "Bumper" opens rapper and Doomtree member P.O.S' fourth official release, We Don't Even Live Here, a literate, sharp blast of revolution with an anarchist slant. Torching material possessions, "Fuck Your Stuff" displays this slant in detail with "Catch me in a mission, pissin' in a convertible trying to create some tension/Open a book, discuss Christopher Hitchens, or how to make bombs out of stuff found in your kitchen." The attitude often seems to be that there's no such thing as an innocent bystander, but Justin Vernon of Bon Iver is here to deliver the rock-solid pop hook of highlight "How We Land," making this a rather seductive entry point into the land of no justice/no peace. When "They Can't Come" rolls around with a bouncing bass and old-school shine, it sounds more like a rent party than a leftist Red party, and as busy as P.O.S' writing style can be, this album is economical and easy at 11 tracks, offering both a prime end-to-end album with plenty of flow, or a right-sized selection of stand-out blows against the empire, ready with kinetic bits of anger, information, and mind-opening bullet points to discuss. Start with the aptly titled "Get Down" with Mike Mictlan and P.O.S offering an electro re-imagining of the Bad Brains, or choose the block-rockin' "They Can't Come," a thick anthem with Sims that looks to "clash with their whole set of standards" and makes it sound delicious. Maybe there's a touch more swagger than solutions on the set, but Minneapolis' secret weapon really should have saved the title of his previous set, Never Better, for this one. ~ David Jeffries
$12.99

Rap/Hip-Hop - Released October 26, 2018 | Rhymesayers

$7.99

Rap/Hip-Hop - Released March 17, 2017 | Doomtree Records, LLC

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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released February 1, 2019 | Rhymesayers

$1.29

Rap/Hip-Hop - Released February 24, 2017 | Doomtree Records, LLC

$1.29

Rap/Hip-Hop - Released February 24, 2017 | Doomtree Records, LLC

$1.29

Rap/Hip-Hop - Released November 29, 2018 | Doomtree Records, LLC

$12.99

Rap/Hip-Hop - Released October 22, 2013 | Rhymesayers

$4.99

Rap/Hip-Hop - Released September 11, 2012 | Rhymesayers

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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released October 26, 2018 | Rhymesayers

$15.49

Rap/Hip-Hop - Released October 22, 2012 | Rhymesayers

Booklet
The idea of "punk rap" rarely feels as real and needed as it does when the twitchy "Bumper" opens rapper and Doomtree member P.O.S' fourth official release, We Don't Even Live Here, a literate, sharp blast of revolution with an anarchist slant. Torching material possessions, "Fuck Your Stuff" displays this slant in detail with "Catch me in a mission, pissin' in a convertible trying to create some tension/Open a book, discuss Christopher Hitchens, or how to make bombs out of stuff found in your kitchen." The attitude often seems to be that there's no such thing as an innocent bystander, but Justin Vernon of Bon Iver is here to deliver the rock-solid pop hook of highlight "How We Land," making this a rather seductive entry point into the land of no justice/no peace. When "They Can't Come" rolls around with a bouncing bass and old-school shine, it sounds more like a rent party than a leftist Red party, and as busy as P.O.S' writing style can be, this album is economical and easy at 11 tracks, offering both a prime end-to-end album with plenty of flow, or a right-sized selection of stand-out blows against the empire, ready with kinetic bits of anger, information, and mind-opening bullet points to discuss. Start with the aptly titled "Get Down" with Mike Mictlan and P.O.S offering an electro re-imagining of the Bad Brains, or choose the block-rockin' "They Can't Come," a thick anthem with Sims that looks to "clash with their whole set of standards" and makes it sound delicious. Maybe there's a touch more swagger than solutions on the set, but Minneapolis' secret weapon really should have saved the title of his previous set, Never Better, for this one. ~ David Jeffries
$12.99

Rap/Hip-Hop - Released October 22, 2012 | Rhymesayers

$4.99

Rap/Hip-Hop - Released August 16, 2012 | Rhymesayers

$12.99

Rap/Hip-Hop - Released October 26, 2018 | Rhymesayers

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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released February 3, 2009 | Rhymesayers

It almost feels mean-spirited to call P.O.S. rap-rock, so sullied is that name from millennial mook-rock, but as he proudly interpolates Fugazi and Notorious B.I.G. on Never Better, it becomes obvious that this term is one he's determined to redefine. Track titles like "Drumroll (We're All Thirsty)" and "Terrorish" don't disappoint, all churlish guitar thuds, chest-thumping choruses and rapid-fire rhymes; it feels like the Linkin Park aesthetic done right, which is, really, a strange artistic achievement, but one handily accomplished. These hot flashes of intensity are nicely contrasted by neighbors like the darkly soothing "Optimist (We Are Not for Them)" and the satisfying boom-bap of "Savion Glover," giving the album some assured ebbs in intensity. Better still is the bombastically chintzy "Goodbye," which sounds like the type of beat Just Blaze would save for his very favorite client. But this is staunchly P.O.S.' show, and as an MC he's eager to dazzle. While his big emphatic Midwestern enunciation recalls Eminem, his emo-rap fixations are more in line with El-P or Cadence Weapon. He's fixated, obsessed even, with his friends, particularly those who've abused his trust, and constructs his record from the pensive moments of solitude between vainglorious barnburners. Between this brutal bleating and the general anger of the production, the record is dank and punishing on the ears -- probably just as P.O.S. intended, but still a step or two shy of the sonic maturity he so yearns to lend the subgenre. ~ Clayton Purdom
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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released February 1, 2007 | Rhymesayers

Punk rocker/rapper P.O.S. got the attention of indie hip-hop label Rhymesayers with his 2004 self-released Ipecac Neat, and so his next album and Rhymesayers debut, Audition, acts as not only a way to convince the label he belongs on their roster, but also as a greater introduction to the world outside the Twin Cities. His rock influences are abundantly clear, making themselves known in the heavy electric guitars and bass that are the background for much of the record, adding a nice element to the overall sound, a rich, full, yet somewhat messy beat that focuses as much on melody and chord changes as it does on rhythm, but there are plenty of hip-hop elements -- scratching, a hollow drum machine, synthesizers -- too. It's a very well-produced album, exciting and musical and intense. P.O.S.'s intensity is, in fact, the most striking aspect of Audition, both in his delivery, which sounds disarmingly like Eminem (via "Lose Yourself," "Stan," etc) and his often violent lyrics ("Paul Kersey to Jack Kimball" is about vendettas and "The Kill in Me" contains the creepy, half-sung chorus of "You can't cut surgically with a shaky hand/And honestly my nerves are shot again/Let me treat you like a doll and snap your neck in my hands"). P.O.S. has a really good, fast flow, with interesting, provoking rhymes that don't come across as erudite or condescending ("Sometimes I feel like a bastard surrounded by fathers" he says in "Bush League Pysche-Out Stuff," one of the best tracks on the record, with a great spy movie-themed bassline acting as pretty much the only element in the beat), and the songs where he sticks to solely to rapping turn out a lot better than the ones in which he includes the kind of angry alternative rock singing found on Linkin Park albums, which just makes him sound like he's trying too hard to be that rapper for punk kids. But P.O.S.'s appeal should be greater, because he's a talented, introspective, angry MC with a lot to say and a lot of ways to say it, and Audition definitely proves this to anyone who may not have already known. ~ Marisa Brown
$8.99

Rap/Hip-Hop - Released March 27, 2007 | Rhymesayers