Your basket is empty

Categories :

Similar artists

Albums

From
HI-RES$20.99
CD$17.99

Jazz - Released January 1, 1959 | Verve Reissues

Hi-Res Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
From
HI-RES$8.49
CD$6.49

Jazz - Released January 31, 2014 | MPS

Hi-Res Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
From
CD$14.99

Jazz - Released January 1, 1975 | Fantasy Records

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
From
HI-RES$14.99
CD$12.99

Jazz - Released January 1, 1964 | Verve Reissues

Hi-Res
From
CD$10.49

Jazz - Released February 15, 1960 | Verve Reissues

From
CD$12.99

Ambient/New Age - Released January 1, 1995 | Telarc

Oscar Peterson takes it easy during his relaxed set. He had not completely recovered from his stroke but he was still an impressive pianist. Peterson, who is assisted by guitarist Lorne Lofsky, bassist David Young, and drummer Jerry Fuller, is joined by a 20-piece string section arranged and conducted by Rick Wilkins. The 14 holiday tunes (which include "God Rest Ye Merry Gentleman," "White Christmas," "Santa Claus Is Coming to Town" and "Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas") are given tasteful and lightly swinging treatments and there are guest appearances by vibraphonist Dave Samuels and flugelhornist Jack Schantz. But no real surprises or chancestaking occurs and the music is mostly just pleasant. © Scott Yanow /TiVo
From
CD$12.99

Jazz - Released January 1, 1963 | Verve

Master jazz pianist Oscar Peterson had his longest-running trio with bassist Ray Brown and drummer Ed Thigpen, and Night Train may be their finest moment. The repertoire here is comprised mostly of standards, although the choices seem deliberate. In treatments of jazz chestnuts like "C-Jam Blues" and "Georgia on My Mind," the trio works inside these well-known songs, painting over familiar colors and reworking traditional melodies while staying true to the spirit of each tune. The chemistry between Thigpen, Brown, and Peterson is unassailable. Peterson in particular is at the top of his game here, running the whole history of jazz through his dexterous, nimble fingers with an in-the-pocket ease not always apparent on his earlier recordings. Night Train was produced by Norman Granz, who had already sold Verve Records to MGM, but continued to record his favorite artists, of whom Peterson was one. The production is superb, and translates especially well via remastering. The Verve reissue features additional tracks, including alternate takes, rehearsals, full versions of "My Heart Belongs to Daddy" and "Volare," and an incomplete take of Charlie Parker's "Now's the Time." New packaging, expanded liner notes, and photographs make the 1997 CD version of Night Train a keeper. © Anthony Tognazzini /TiVo
From
HI-RES$20.99
CD$17.99

Jazz - Released January 1, 1959 | Verve Reissues

Hi-Res
From
HI-RES$20.99
CD$17.99

Jazz - Released January 1, 1959 | Verve

Hi-Res
From
HI-RES$8.49
CD$6.49

Jazz - Released January 31, 2014 | MPS

Hi-Res
This matchup between pianist Oscar Peterson, bassist Niels-Henning Ørsted Pedersen, and drummer Louis Hayes directly precedes Peterson's recordings for Pablo. The pianist is in typically brilliant form on the LP, performing six standards (including "Soft Winds" and "On the Trail") along with his own "Wheatland." From the results here, it couldn't have been too surprising that Peterson would want to record frequently with Pedersen in future years. © Scott Yanow /TiVo
From
HI-RES$8.49
CD$6.49

Jazz - Released January 31, 2014 | MPS

Hi-Res
From
CD$8.49

Jazz - Released July 9, 2020 | Ossonpete Music Records

From
HI-RES$8.49
CD$6.49

Jazz - Released January 31, 2014 | MPS

Hi-Res
Oscar Peterson recorded a remarkable amount of albums during his career but, surprisingly, this was his first full record of unaccompanied piano solos. Some observers consider his MPS recordings to be his best (quite a few are collected in the four-CD reissue Exclusively for My Friends, including this one). The solo album features Peterson (freed from the constraints of his trio) stretching out on nine familiar standards and really tearing into a few of them, including "Perdido," "Bye Bye Blackbird," "Lulu's Back in Town," while giving "Little Girl Blue" a beautiful and lyrical treatment. A prelude to his outstanding Pablo recordings, My Favorite Instrument is one of Peterson's top albums of the 1960s. © Scott Yanow /TiVo
From
CD$7.49

Jazz - Released January 1, 1997 | Verve

Since several of the songs here are the type that would get requested (such as "People," "The Girl from Ipanema," and "The Days of Wine and Roses") in the mid-'60s, this particular Oscar Peterson CD reissue would not seem to have much potential, but the pianist mostly uplifts the material and adds a few songs (such as his own "Goodbye, J.D." and John Lewis' "D & E") that probably no one asked for. Overall, this is a reasonably enjoyable Oscar Peterson session, featuring bassist Ray Brown and drummer Ed Thigpen. © Scott Yanow /TiVo
From
HI-RES$8.49
CD$6.49

Jazz - Released January 31, 2014 | MPS

Hi-Res
Pianist Oscar Peterson is frequently astounding on this solo set. After nearly 20 years of mostly performing with trios, Peterson sounds quite liberated in this setting, throwing in some hot stride, unexpected changes in tempos and keys, and surprises whenever he thinks of them. "Give Me the Simple Life," "Honeysuckle Rose," and the ironically titled "A Little Jazz Exercise" are quite remarkable, yet Peterson also leaves space for some sensitive ballads. © Scott Yanow /TiVo
From
CD$12.99

Jazz - Released January 1, 1999 | Telarc

This is one of the best post-stroke Oscar Peterson sessions in the catalog, thanks in great part to the distinguished company he keeps (Ray Brown and Milt Jackson) and the stimulating atmosphere of the live setting (New York's Blue Note club). Right from the first track, "Ja-Da," you can tell that this is going to be a fun session, as the slippery, swinging, totally interlocked, totally assured way in which these vets react to each other kicks in immediately. Peterson's right hand is fleet, feathery in touch, and bluesy in feel; the left providing just enough punctuation, and at 75, Jackson's bluesy eloquence had not diminished in the least. Ray Brown's time and placement of notes is, as usual, impeccable, and the very talented drummer in his group at the time, Karriem Riggins, provides a swinging kick for the quartet. In the spirit of democracy, each star gets a solo number -- Peterson plays his ballad "When Summer Comes," Jackson pours out a doleful "Nature Boy," and Brown's stream-of-consciousness medley eventually attracts the funky brushes of Riggins. But it's always better to hear them together. © Richard S. Ginell /TiVo
From
HI-RES$8.49
CD$6.49

Jazz - Released January 31, 2014 | MPS

Hi-Res
Pianist Oscar Peterson joins up with his old friends, vibraphonist Milt Jackson and bassist Ray Brown, in addition to his drummer of the period, Louis Hayes, for a particularly enjoyable outing. After a throwaway version of the Rolling Stones' "(I Can't Get No) Satisfaction," the all-star quartet performs Jackson's title cut, Benny Carter's ballad "Dream of You," and four standards. Although not up to the excitement of Peterson's best Pablo recordings of the 1970s, this is an enjoyable album. © Scott Yanow /TiVo
From
HI-RES$20.99
CD$17.99

Jazz - Released January 1, 1959 | Verve

Hi-Res
From
CD$5.99

Blues - Released May 5, 2020 | Delta Records

From
HI-RES$20.99
CD$17.99

Jazz - Released January 1, 1959 | Verve Reissues

Hi-Res