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Classical - Released January 20, 2017 | Glossa

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - Qobuzissime
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Opera - Released April 6, 2018 | Glossa

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - 5 Sterne Fono Forum Klassik
Created in 1749 to commemorate the Treaty of Aix-la-Chapelle signed between George II and Louis XV of France to end the War of the Austrian Succession, Rameau’s pastorale héroïque Naïs consecrates the triumph of virtuosity on the stage of the Académie Royale de Musique, while in England, Handel wrote his famous Music for the Royal Fireworks for the same occasion. Weary of sombre tragedies and their dark and oppressive passions, audiences received lighter works more enthusiastically – ballets and pastorales – for which soprano Marie Fel and tenor Pierre Jélyotte were applauded for their prodigious vocal performances. With Naïs, Rameau produces some of his most impressive pages, among which the overture and descriptive prologue, tracing the epic fight between the Titans and the heavenly court for the rule of Olympus. Chivalrous exchanges, athlete evolutions, prophecies, pastoral celebrations, naval battles and underwater nuptials punctuate the work and support the blooming of tender feelings that unite Naïs and Neptune. This co-production between the Centre de Musique Baroque de Versailles (CMBV − Centre of Baroque Music Versailles) and the Müpa Budapest Early Music Festival confirms the position of György Vashegyi in the field of baroque music, and French music in particular. Following the success of Rameau’s Les Fêtes de Polymnie (The Festivals of Polyhymnia) in 2015, and the revelation that was Mondonville’s Isbé, the Hungarian conductor is at it again with excellent singers and his two ensembles, the Budapest Orfeo Orchestra and the Purcell Chorus, which he founded in Budapest at the end of his studies at The Franz Liszt Academy of Music, completed by master classes from the likes of Sir John Eliot Gardiner and Helmut Rilling. This French-Hungarian production focusing on Rameau will be extended with the upcoming release of Les Indes Galantes (The Amorous Indies). © François Hudry/Qobuz
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Classical - Released April 10, 2020 | Bru Zane

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or
Located in Venice’s Palazzetto Bru Zane, the Centre de Musique Romantique Française (Centre for French Romantic Music) continues in its pursuit of publishing unknown French music with the very same dynamism it’s displayed since its conception. This particular excavation was performed in Budapest by the Purcell Choir and the Orfeo Orchestra, conducted by György Vashegyi. The cathedral-sized concert hall in which it was recorded has exceptional acoustics and gives this discovery a wonderful sense of space and openness. While the protagonists of this opera Phèdre (Phaedra) may be familiar to us – Phaedra, Hippolytus, Theseus and Ono, its composer is much less well-known. The opera may have been shunned by Berlioz sixty years after it was written but Jean-Baptiste Lemoyne nevertheless scored a veritable triumph in 1786 when it was sung at the Opera (Royal Academy of Music) by the best singers of the time. Especially when it’s compared to Gluck’s masterpieces, this opera deserves to come out of hiding due to its undeniable melodic and theatrical qualities. Born in the Dordogne, Lemoyne studied in Berlin before becoming second music master to Frederick the Great, King of Prussia and patron of the arts. Upon his return to France, he had to contend with the rivalry of the Parisian public between the Gluckists and the Piccinnists, whose notorious feud had not yet come to an end. Phèdre was one of the great successes of the old social and political order in France before the French revolution and even survived up until the beginning of the 19th century, before it fell by the wayside and was seemingly forgotten about. Leading one of the few Hungarian ensembles devoted to early music on period instruments, the spirited Francophile György Vashegyi captures the dramatic intensity of this score brilliantly with an outstanding quartet of international soloists who breathe life back into this opera. © François Hudry/Qobuz
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Opera - Released October 18, 2019 | Glossa

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
The remarkable Hypermnestre by Charles-Hubert Gervais is the latest unremembered early 18th-century French opera to be recorded afresh for Glossa, and conducted by György Vashegyi. Gervais was a contemporary of Campra and Destouches, learning from Lully and paving the way for Rameau and, like Marais and François Couperin, open to the Italianising trends of “les goûts réunis”. A high-quality libretto from Joseph La Font tackles the story of Hypermnestra which proved so popular in the early eighteenth century. The Glossa recording contains both the original fifth act and the major revision of it from 1717 and Vashegyi drives the whole tragedy expertly to its bitter (and not-so-bitter!) end. Musically, this “tragédie lyrique” provides powerful opportunities for the trio of leading characters, here taken by Katherine Watson (Hypermnestre), Thomas Dolié (Danaüs, her father) and Mathias Vidal (Lyncée, her betrothed), but they are ably supported by Juliette Mars, Chantal Santon-Jeffery, Manuel Núñez Camelino and Philippe-Nicolas Martin. No French opera of this time would have been complete without a generous helping of choral or instrumental music and Gervais – a master of melody, harmony and orchestration – serves these up in a dazzling set of divertissements and festive set pieces full of dances (including a massive passacaille); all this performed with great stylistic awareness and vivacity by Vashegyi’s Orfeo Orchestra and Purcell Choir. © Glossa
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Classical - Released April 2, 2021 | Accent

Booklet
The "Esterházy Music Collection" series with the Orfeo Orchestra conducted by György Vashegyi on the Accent label is dedicated to presenting musical treasures of the Esterházy family, many of which have been largely forgotten over the centuries. The recordings usually take place in the Apollo Hall of the Esterházy Palace in Fertod-Eszterháza, whose acoustics are among the best in the world. The present production is the third volume and offers a selection of earlier symphonies by Joseph Haydn. In addition to Symphonies Nos. 24, 42 and 43 from the years 1764 to 1771, No. 30, which already bore the epithet "Alleluja" on contemporary copies from 1765, is also heard. This is based on the use of the Gregorian "Alleluia" of the Easter liturgy in the main theme of the first movement. The symphony may have been composed for ecclesiastical use; a possible performance took place on Easter Sunday 1765. © Accent
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Classical - Released October 2, 2020 | Glossa

Hi-Res Booklet
György Vashegyi and his Orfeo Orchestra and Purcell Choir offer up a recording of Boismortier’s Les Voyages de l’Amour of which this 1736 opéra-ballet has been in sore need, a score long and unjustly neglected. For this latest dramatic extravaganza on Glossa, Chantal Santon-Jeffery takes on the title role of lovesick Cupid, and the soprano is joined by two further widely experienced stars of the French Baroque opera revival in Katherine Watson (as the god of love’s sidekick and factotum Zéphire) and Judith van Wanroij as the shepherdess Daphné, smartly resistant to the god’s charms (until the end of the fourth act). By 1736, Joseph Bodin de Boismortier had become well-known in Parisian musical circles for his entertaining instrumental and vocal music and in his booklet essay Benoît Dratwicki (of the Centre de Musique Baroque de Versailles) explains how this fashionable composer came to have his first production for the Paris Opéra cast into the shadows, how the roles for Cupid and Zéphire may have originally been written for two prominent dessus of the time but were replaced by male singers for the première and how this new recorded edition aims to provide a performance as the composer would have wanted it. Katia Velletaz, Éléonore Pancrazi and Thomas Dolié also contribute to this lively entertainment, with this release also containing two differing versions of the second act about the arrow-firing god of love’s travels through village, city and court in search of true love for himself. © Glossa
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Classical - Released June 19, 2020 | Accent

Hi-Res Booklet
Composed in 1761, the year Joseph Haydn became the court musician for the Esterházy Family (with whom he stayed for more than thirty years), Symphonies No. 6, 7 and 8 form a unique trilogy in the history of music and are, according to musicologist Marc Vignal, Haydn's first masterpieces in this field and probably even for symphonies in general. Haydn put all his theory and know-how into the compositions, at a time when he was still being tested by the Prince, having to meet overwhelming specifications that would give any musician today nightmares. In these three gems of concise, virtuosic composing, Haydn distributes solos to all the musicians of the orchestra, including the double bass and bassoon, instruments which were not accustomed to this kind of exercise. It is a fiesta of sonic garlands, as found in the ancient baroque "concerto grosso", alternating with dark, deeply moving passages. The subtitles, the only ones Haydn himself gave to his symphonies, "Le Matin", "Le Midi", "Le Soir", were suggested and even commissioned by Prince Paul Anton to describe an allegory of the "Hours of the Day" and, above all, the three stages of life. Recorded in 2019 in the splendid Apollo Hall of Eszterháza Castle in Fertöd, where Haydn wrote many symphonies (though not these ones), this recording by the Orfeo Orchestra of Budapest - not to be confused with the Orpheus Chamber Orchestra - conducted by György Vashegyi obviously has an undeniably authentic feel. © François Hudry/Qobuz
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Classical - Released October 2, 2020 | Accent

Hi-Res Booklet
Gregor Joseph Werner (1693-1766) was Kapellmeister at the Eszterházy court in Eisenstadt, and on his death he was succeeded by Joseph Haydn. A surviving manuscript score of his oratorio Der gute Hirt is preserved in the music collection of the National Library of Hungary in Budapest. Werner’s oratorio is a “sepolcro” oratorio originating from the Viennese court tradition. This particular musical-dramatic form of the Holy Week oratorio performed around the holy sepulcher of Catholic churches, became fashionable throughout the Habsburg empire during the last third of the 17th century. This genre, a staged musical performance presenting the burial of Jesus Christ, was a part of church music practice in Central Europe as late as the 1730s. On 28 March 1739, the Good Friday service held in the Palace Chapel in Eisenstadt was centered around a musical drama setting of Gregor Werner’s own text based on the Parable of the Good Shepherd in the Gospel of Luke, thereby commemorating Jesus Christ’s death on the cross at Golgotha. The single lost sheep is the symbol of man who, having revolted and lost his secure place in Paradise, can be guided back to the path of salvation only through the sacrifice of the all-forgiving Good Shepherd/Jesus, the Father’s only son, who will never leave him. © Accent
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Classical - Released October 6, 2017 | Glossa

Hi-Res Booklet
For approaching a century and a half in France – across the reigns of Louis XIV, XV and XVI – the Palace of Versailles played host, both indoors and outdoors, for an extraordinary sequence of dramatic musical performances. "Un Opéra pour trois rois", conducted by György Vashegyi, represents the legacy of that time, a specially constructed operatic entertainment drawn from works by composers from Lully to Gluck, commissioned – and even, on occasion, performed – by kings, their queens and inamoratas. There are plenty of firm favourites here – Rameau’s “Tristes apprêts” (Castor et Pollux) and “Forêts paisibles” (Les Indes galantes), but one of the additional attractions of this double-album extravaganza released by Glossa is the chance to hear music of quality by hitherto woefully ignored compositions (Le Retour du printemps, Les Caractères de la Folie, Le Pouvoir de l’Amour), all demonstrating the depths of quality still waiting to be rediscovered. And there are selections to be had from operas by Mondonville, Destouches, Leclair and Francoeur and Rebel as well. Further attractions are the performances from the three soloists (each adopting the role of an allegorical figure for the event): Chantal Santon-Jeffery, Emöke Barath and Thomas Dolié, along with Vashegyi’s Purcell Choir and Orfeo Orchestra. In his booklet essay, Benoît Dratwicki draws on his immense knowledge in order to set the scene in the royal residence of Versailles for this imaginary fête musicale of lyricism and duets, music both sombre and joyful, symphonies and orages.