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Alternative & Indie - Released September 30, 2013 | Warp Records

Distinctions Pitchfork: Best New Music
Over the course of Oneohtrix Point Never's discography, Daniel Lopatin managed to sound markedly different from album to album while keeping an overarching aesthetic. His Warp debut, R Plus Seven, often feels like a microcosm of that approach; these shape-shifting songs hold together more because of Lopatin's bold sonic palette than any unifying concept. Aside from the opening track, "Boring Angel," he downplays the drones that made up the heart of his earlier work (and Replica, to a lesser extent) in favor of bright, briskly applied tones that, on the surface, seem like the opposite of his usual modus operandi. This fragmentation could be seen as a variation of Replica's choppy recontextualizing, though the results are dizzying rather than hypnotic: "Americans" hops from environmental sounds to zapping synths to cheery strings to choral vocals in what feels like the musical equivalent of a series of smash cuts. Similarly, Lopatin trades one kind of nostalgia for another: instead of evoking (and sampling from) the '70s and early '80s as his earlier work did, the brittle, sometimes cheap MIDI-esque sounds he sprinkles throughout R Plus Seven recall the late '80s and early '90s. The preponderance of choral pads on tracks such as the fittingly named "Still Life" give the album an eerie, uncanny valley-ish undercurrent, while "Along"'s mix of piping synth flutes, exotic percussion, and sax sounds like new age and smooth jazz run through a woodchipper. However, thanks to the light-handed arrangements, what could be cheesy or ironic more often than not feels forward-looking. Despite the dots and dashes of sound at any given moment, the album gives an overall impression of sleekness, and its subversive glossiness suggests that its tracks were made from pop songs that were shattered into shards that are as alluring as they are difficult to piece together. Occasionally, Lopatin tones down the hyperactivity a bit, resulting in highlights like "Problem Areas," which is carried by rubbery bass and a stairstepping brass motif, and "Zebra" and "Chrome Country," which both use warm-sounding synths to surprisingly emotional effect (even if the latter song tweaks the choral pad so violently that it sounds like it's shrieking). By conventional standards, R Plus Seven isn't a widely appealing crossover for Lopatin's new label. Yet in an almost perverse way, the playful spirit of these tracks and their lively sounds make for some of his most accessible work yet. For the most part, the album showcases Oneohtrix Point Never's restlessness and ambition in flattering ways; if it's equal parts mystifying and beautiful, it's also a puzzle well worth trying to figure out. ~ Heather Phares
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Film Soundtracks - Released December 13, 2019 | Warp Records

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Alternative & Indie - Released June 1, 2018 | Warp Records

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Alternative & Indie - Released November 13, 2015 | Warp Records

Oneohtrix Point Never's Daniel Lopatin is the kind of artist you expect to keep evolving, even if exactly how he evolves on each album is unpredictable. That said, he still throws listeners a few curves on Garden of Delete, an album inspired by his adolescence and his 2014 tour with Nine Inch Nails and Soundgarden. Any expectations that this is OPN's "guitar album" are quickly dashed: Lopatin's palette is far wider-ranging, incorporating aspects of his previous albums (as well as a nod to his work as Chuck Person on "ECCOJAMC1") and elements of metal, trance, R&B, and Top 40 pop that, when combined, feel unmistakably like Oneohtrix Point Never. The way he transforms different sounds and eras into something nostalgic yet new has always been one of his greatest strengths. He goes one better on Garden of Delete, imbuing these songs with powerful, wide-ranging emotions. "Animals"' lugubrious melody is mournful to the point of uneasiness, while "No Good"'s deceptively soothing flow and distorted vocoder make it a self-destructing love song. As dense as R Plus Seven was cleanly sculpted, there's a lot to unpack within Garden of Delete, including its title: a phrase that suggests the meticulous task of editing music as well as the union of creation and destruction (and shortens to G.O.D.), it's the perfect mission statement for an album that combines past and present in surprising, and surprisingly organic ways. While "Lift"'s crystalline melody is classic OPN, the vocals that dominate the album add to its personal feel -- even if they're courtesy of the software instrument Chipspeech. Lopatin uses the software to give voice to Ezra, an alien who figured heavily in Garden of Delete's promotional campaign and who lends the album its emotional arc. We first hear his slurred tones on "Intro," but it's "Ezra" that offers a proper introduction to the character as well as the album's scope: the track's rapid shifts between heavily processed alt-metal guitars, stark, glistening synths, dueling vocals, and frenetic arpeggios feel like extraterrestrial mood swings. Shorter songs like "SDFK" and fragmented excursions like "Mutant Standard," which combines a looping melody that morphs from morose to triumphant with vertiginous atmospheres, only add to the feeling that everything on Garden of Delete is teetering on the brink. Lopatin uses his music's porous boundaries brilliantly, whether he's fusing molten R&B with death metal's growls and rapid-fire kick drums on the standout "Sticky Drama," crafting dizzying juxtapositions and edits on "I Bite Through It"'s violent melancholy, or naming one of the album's most beautiful ambient pop moments after the child abuse documentary Child of Rage. These fascinating dualities make Garden of Delete some of Lopatin's most intellectually engaging music as well as some of his funniest, darkest, and most cathartic. ~ Heather Phares
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Alternative & Indie - Released November 15, 2019 | Warp Records

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Electronic/Dance - Released November 8, 2011 | Software

Replica, retro-synth drone maven Daniel Lopatin's return as Oneohtrix Point Never following his critically adored, profile-rocketing 2010 album Returnal (and his equally estimable work with Ford & Lopatin), offers repeat customers both familiarity and surprise in roughly equal measure. In the former column, Lopatin still grounds his creations in conspicuously beautiful, buzzing, humming, and twinkling Kosmiche synthscapes; once again, everything feels draped in a syrupy, soft-focus analog glaze. But only one track, the aptly titled "Submersible," sustains itself on warmly drifting, rhythmically unfettered synthetic sound washes alone. Elsewhere, gentle waves of gauziness give way, more or less gradually, to more dynamic elements: on "Remember," an intertwined pair of looped vocal snippets (one speaking the track's title, the other a muffled, mutilated moan) slowly emerges from the amniotic haze; dappled pace-setter "Andro"'s undercurrent of murmuring, garbled sound scraps flips in the final 30 seconds into a stuttered, ritualistic outburst of hand percussion and jungle screeches. By and large, though, rhythm is not merely appended to but fully foregrounded in these compositions, in a way that's essentially new for Oneohtrix -- rarely in the conventional guise of drum tracks and "beats" (though there is a stark, rudimentary one anchoring the first two minutes of "Up," which might be approximately danceable if it weren't in 7/8), but often in the form of sampled loops, creating a definite rhythmic structure without (in most cases) the use of "percussion" per se, a much calmer variation of the micro-sampling methods of Akufen and Matthew Herbert. "Power of Persuasion" introduces this approach with a shifting series of classical-sounding (acoustic) piano figures stuck on short-circuit repeat, to placid, gently numbing effect, while the rather less somnolent "Sleep Dealer" lassoes in a wider array of thuds, groans, and whirrs along with a perky keyboard fillip, indecipherable spoken bits, and a satisfied-sounding exhalation to form a pleasantly cheery little jaunt, and the gently erratic "Nassau" adds some rustling, shuffling footsteps that sound a bit like soft-shoe tap dancing. Even the lovely, lulling title track, which combines static buzzes and fluid, meandering melodic tones with no regular rhythmic matrix to speak of, creates a sense of gentle groove and motion in its soft, patient new age piano chords. Apart from his usual battery of analog keyboards (and a considerable amount of actual acoustic piano), Lopatin apparently culled much of the sound for this album from a DVD compilation of TV commercials dating from 1985 to 1993. Though it makes for an intriguing compositional back-story -- and it clearly provided him a rich sound palette from which to draw -- it's rare that that source material is specifically evident while listening; at best it functions on a more energetic, subconscious level, making the typically nebulous sonic nostalgia of the chillwave/hypnagogic pop movement -- with which these productions bear some strong commonalities -- more literally (if still somewhat imperceptibly) manifest. ~ K. Ross Hoffman
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Electronic/Dance - Released December 2, 2013 | Software Recording Co.

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Alternative & Indie - Released June 21, 2010 | Editions Mego

"'Stress Waves' is caught somewhere between the pulsing cycles of 60s minimalism and the untethered drift of Berlin's Chain Reaction label. It's gorgeous, heartbreaking even..."
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Electronic/Dance - Released August 11, 2017 | Warp Records

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Alternative & Indie - Released October 25, 2018 | Warp Records

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Electronic/Dance - Released June 8, 2017 | Warp Records

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Alternative & Indie - Released November 23, 2018 | Warp Records

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Dance - Released November 19, 2012 | Software

A compilation gathered from Daniel Lopatin's first three Oneohtrix Point Never albums (2007's Betrayed in the Octagon and 2009's Zones Without People and Russian Mind), Rifts presents a triptych that defined his distinctive approach to drone-based electronic music. As sprawling as this two-and-a-half-hour collection is and as wide-ranging as its tracks are, it's also one of the purest examples of Oneohtrix Point Never's aesthetic, full of drones that feel either weightless or massive, punctuated by synth arpeggios and the occasional found sound or tweaked vocal. Lopatin built quite a world with these three albums, one inspired by the soulful, searching side of science fiction -- many of the song titles here feel like they could be the names of forgotten classics of '70s and '80s sci-fi films and literature -- as well as forebears ranging from Tangerine Dream to Boards of Canada. The warmth of Lopatin's analog synths on these tracks rightly drew comparisons to the latter act, and the mix of nostalgic tones and unsettling moods often suggests a more expansive, ambient-leaning version of the duo's darkest album, Geogaddi (and had a similar way of letting its shadowy sounds sneak in and mess with listeners' emotions on an almost subliminal level). However, Rifts' tracks have even more range, spanning the cavernous darkness of "Woe Is the Transgression II," which alternates between feral whoops and passages of shimmering drones layered upon each other like whale calls; suffocating synth workouts like "Transmat Memories"; and fleeting moments of beauty like "Months," which add poignancy to its vastness. Rifts also has a remarkable balance to it; for every epic like "When I Get Back from New York," which builds from blippy arpeggios into more moody and abrasive terrain over the course of 16 minutes, a shorter track like "Laser to Laser" distills OPN's sound into something not exactly pop, but certainly a lot more immediate. Similarly, Lopatin manages to run the emotional gamut with "Grief and Repetition," a funereal melody engulfed in a fog of drones, and "Hyperdawn," which is the track that would play as the credits rolled if Rifts were the score to a sci-fi film with a happy ending. Fittingly, the title tracks of the albums this collection was drawn from are among the defining moments, showcasing Lopatin at his most retro and most striking: "Zones Without People" has an almost sinister feel to its clinical serenity, while "Russian Mind"'s dense arpeggios are more than a little paranoid in their intensity and "Betrayed in the Octagon" evokes Blade Runner not just in its pulsing synths but its hazy, half-remembered melancholy. Unabashedly ambitious yet nuanced, Rifts is equally compelling listening whether taken in small chunks or in its entire massive sweep. ~ Heather Phares
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Dance - Released November 20, 2007 | Software

Brooklyn synth wizard Daniel Lopatin aka Oneohtrix Point Never toiled long in the trenches of the noise scene before eventually breaking through to international acclaim with his glowing 2009 compilation Rifts. Rifts gathered together the best excerpts from an already lengthy discography of small-release cassettes and other lesser releases, the likes of which Lopatin would continue to spit out even as accolades continued to come his way. Released in 2007, Betrayed in the Octagon was more or less the debut of the project, and focused on arpeggiated tones from vintage synthesizers, cascading through phrases of haunted elegance and more mellow new age reflection. ~ Fred Thomas
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Electronic/Dance - Released April 14, 2014 | Software Recording Co.

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Dance - Released March 26, 2013 | Software

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Alternative & Indie - Released September 13, 2010 | Editions Mego

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Dance - Released August 11, 2009 | Software

Brooklyn synth wizard Daniel Lopatin aka Oneohtrix Point Never toiled long in the trenches of the noise scene before eventually breaking through to international acclaim with his glowing 2009 compilation Rifts. Rifts gathered together the best excerpts from an already lengthy discography of small-release cassettes and other lesser releases, the likes of which Lopatin would continue to spit out even as accolades continued to come his way. One such release was 2009's Zones Without People, a highly limited LP release for the Arbor label. All seven compositions on Zones Without People appeared in some form on the massive Rifts collection, and the druggy, dreamy synth tones of the album helped build OPN's reputation as a more noise-derived disciple of Boards of Canada's take on subaquatic synth tones and vortex-forming walls of ambient sound. ~ Fred Thomas
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Alternative & Indie - Released July 27, 2018 | Warp Records

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Electronic/Dance - Released December 2, 2013 | Software Recording Co.