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Jazz - Released June 2, 2017 | Yellowbird Records

Distinctions Indispensable JAZZ NEWS - 5 Sterne Fono Forum Jazz
The Israeli jazz scene never ceases to offer up treasure after treasure. Based in New York, along with a large number of his compatriots, Oded Tzur has already created a sound that's all his own. With Translator's Note, the saxophonist has released a beautiful ode to cross-fertilisation but also to the fundamentals of improvisation. With the pianist Shai Maestro, double-bassist Petros Klampanis and the drummer Ziv Ravitz, he traces the contours of a jazz at whose heart is the thread of melody. But it is the fluidity of the sound that impresses above all else. It is a current that has not only been fed by the springs of the jazz greats. Far from it: in 2007, Tzur took a course in Indian music at the Rotterdam World Music Academy. There, the professor was none other than Hariprasad Chaurasia, grand master of the bansuri flute. The elegant phrase and spiritual depth of his playing naturally inspired Oded Tzur. And to underline that this is a jazz album first and foremost, the record closes with a weightless version of Lonnie's Lament by John Coltrane… All these exchanges, these meetings, haunt Translator's Note, a unique and possessed contemporary jazz album. © MD/Qobuz
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Jazz - Released February 14, 2020 | ECM

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 4F de Télérama
Having moved to New York like a great many Israeli jazz artists, Oded Tzur quickly established his unique tenor saxophone for a simple reason. His teacher was not a player of the instrument, but was none other than the ultimate master of the bansuri flute Hariprasad Chaurasia. By exploring the subtleties of classical Indian music and ragas, the Tel Aviv native was able to build his knowledge of jazz differently. For his arrival on ECM, Oded Tzur joined forces with pianist Nitai Hershkovits, double bassist Petros Klampanis and drummer Jonathan Blake. Each theme on Here Be Dragons presents itself as a sort of mini raga developing over a moving bass and playing on the juxtaposition of two very different musical concepts. “The dialogue between these dimensions takes us wherever it takes us,” details the saxophonist. “For me, the raga is a universal concept. I hear its connection to synagogue prayers or to the blues -- a marvellous creation -- and to music all around the world.” This is a vision he shares with his three colleagues who are all on the same wavelength as him. The level of restraint, the accuracy of the interventions and the talent of manipulating silence are the most impressive on this record, as Tzur easily avoids the contemplative and self-indulging traps. The depth of his sound even allows him to create a rather captivating narrative. The blissful singing appears to invite you to a journey within. This is a sublime album which finishes with a rather surprising cover of Can’t Help Falling In Love by Elvis. With no gimmicks, Oded Tzur makes the King’s iconic hit his own and thus completes his grandiose entry to Manfred Eicher’s label with a cheeky wink. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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Jazz - Released June 26, 2015 | Yellowbird Records

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Jazz - Released February 14, 2020 | ECM

Booklet
Having moved to New York like a great many Israeli jazz artists, Oded Tzur quickly established his unique tenor saxophone for a simple reason. His teacher was not a player of the instrument, but was none other than the ultimate master of the bansuri flute Hariprasad Chaurasia. By exploring the subtleties of classical Indian music and ragas, the Tel Aviv native was able to build his knowledge of jazz differently. For his arrival on ECM, Oded Tzur joined forces with pianist Nitai Hershkovits, double bassist Petros Klampanis and drummer Jonathan Blake. Each theme on Here Be Dragons presents itself as a sort of mini raga developing over a moving bass and playing on the juxtaposition of two very different musical concepts. “The dialogue between these dimensions takes us wherever it takes us,” details the saxophonist. “For me, the raga is a universal concept. I hear its connection to synagogue prayers or to the blues -- a marvellous creation -- and to music all around the world.” This is a vision he shares with his three colleagues who are all on the same wavelength as him. The level of restraint, the accuracy of the interventions and the talent of manipulating silence are the most impressive on this record, as Tzur easily avoids the contemplative and self-indulging traps. The depth of his sound even allows him to create a rather captivating narrative. The blissful singing appears to invite you to a journey within. This is a sublime album which finishes with a rather surprising cover of Can’t Help Falling In Love by Elvis. With no gimmicks, Oded Tzur makes the King’s iconic hit his own and thus completes his grandiose entry to Manfred Eicher’s label with a cheeky wink. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz

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Oded Tzur in the magazine
  • Oded Tzur: intercontinental sax
    Oded Tzur: intercontinental sax The New York-based Israeli saxophonist released his new album "Here Be Dragons" on Munich label ECM, and drew inspiration from concepts of Indian music... a globe-trotting trip!