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Metal - Released December 6, 2019 | Nuclear Blast

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Metal - Released February 14, 2018 | Nuclear Blast

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Metal - Released January 1, 2018 | Nuclear Blast

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Metal - Released March 9, 2018 | Nuclear Blast

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Metal - Released January 1, 2018 | Nuclear Blast

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Metal - Released March 27, 2015 | Nuclear Blast

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Metal - Released September 28, 2007 | Nuclear Blast

Judging from the way Dark Passion Play starts out, it's understandable to assume that it's some sort of opera aria. But hold tight, dear friends, because from out of nowhere metal guitar riffs come swooping in. That's Nightwish for ya -- a Finnish quintet that had been walking the line between symphonic and metallic for ten years by the time of this 2007 release. The album signals the arrival of new singer Anette Olson (who replaced longtime member Tarja Turunen), but for longtime fans worried that this lineup shuffle may alter the band's sound and direction, there's no reason to fret -- Nightwish are as bombastic and dramatic as ever. Understandably, there are quite a few similarities between symphonic metal and prog metal, and this is certainly the case on such tracks as "Bye Bye Beautiful," which contains a very Dream Theater-esque opening. Elsewhere, "Eva" focuses primarily on the vocal talents of Nightwish's new frontwoman, while the slow-building album opener, "The Poet and the Pendulum," proves to be a neat summary of Nightwish's style. Depending on which side of the metal fence you're on, Dark Passion Play is either a symphonic metal triumph or merely pretentious twaddle. ~ Greg Prato
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Metal - Released December 2, 2011 | Roadrunner Records

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Metal - Released July 6, 2018 | Nuclear Blast

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Rock - Released December 6, 2019 | Nuclear Blast

Recorded on their 20th anniversary tour in Buenos Aires, this live recording captures Nightwish playing a selection of not only fan favorites but some of their own favorites. Included are live renditions of "Wish I Had an Angel," "Nemo," and "End of All Hope." ~ Rich Wilson
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Rock - Released December 2, 2011 | Roadrunner Records

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Metal - Released March 22, 2018 | Nuclear Blast

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To celebrate the end of the platinum-selling Finnish symphonic metal outfit's 2013 Imaginaerum World Tour, which boasted 104 performances in 34 countries, Nightwish decided to go out with a bang and bring their opulent live show to the tiny German village of Wacken and its mammoth annual metalfest, Wacken Open Air. The first Nightwish release to feature their new singer, ex-After Forever frontwoman Floor Jansen, the powerhouse Showtime/Storytime sees the group tear through an epic 16-song set in front of 85,000 screaming fans. The DVD/Blu-ray edition adds a concert film of the 85-minute performance (filmed with 17 cameras), as well as a 120-minute tour documentary titled Please Learn the Setlist in 48 Hours and a 16-minute band table hockey tournament. ~ James Christopher Monger
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Metal - Released January 1, 2018 | Nuclear Blast

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Metal - Released March 13, 2009 | Nuclear Blast

All things considered, Finnish heavy metal hitmakers Nightwish rebounded remarkably well from their traumatic divorce proceedings with lead singer Tarja Turunen, moving relatively quickly, once the dust had settled, to replace her with accomplished Swedish siren Anette Olzon (multiple auditions notwithstanding) before carrying on with their career, as usual, on 2007's Dark Passion Play. Another multi-platinum seller in their homeland, yielding a pair of number one singles, the record was also eagerly embraced by the band's supportive global fan base and led to the most ambitious world tour of Nightwish's career, then, perhaps not surprisingly, 2009's Made in Hong Kong (And Various Other Places) live album. To be clear, though, this was actually a mini-live album, containing just eight in-concert recordings of songs from Dark Passion Play, which were then rounded out with two B-sides and a demo -- also from that same LP. Needless to say, some observers may find it a bit odd that Nightwish would choose not to touch any of their legacy material from the Turunen era here, since, despite having a far less operatic, more traditionally rock-bred voice, Olzon handled those old hits very capably throughout the tour. But if the remaining members of Nightwish have done anything consistently throughout this transition, it's been to look forward, never backwards; so in that sense, the five-piece's meticulous (if not exactly surprise-filled) renditions of new fan favorites such as "Bye Bye Beautiful," "Amaranth," and "The Islander" -- not to mention all 14 minutes of leader Tuomas Holopainen's latest micro-symphony, "The Poet and the Pendulum" -- offer a suitable document of this maiden tour with Olzon out front. As for those aforementioned B-sides, "Escapist" is a hooky power metal anthem that could have easily made the album, and "While Your Lips Are Still Red" is another of bassist Marco Hietala's acoustic folk ditties, after which comes the demo for Dark Passion Play standout "Cadence of Her Last Breath." So with all that in mind, possibly the most enticing feature of Made in Hong Kong is its bonus DVD (for the most part spoken in Finnish with English subtitles), which features all three videos from Dark Passion Play and a penetrating 37-minute tour documentary. In it, fans get the bandmembers' uncensored, very candid thoughts on this crucial new chapter of their career, front-row views of the on-stage and off-stage highs and lows of 150-plus grueling shows, the insecurities of introducing their new singer to Turunen loyalists (although there's finally a quick glimpse of the band rocking through an old staple, "Wishmaster"), and the sort of "boys will be boys" tour bus behavior that led Olzon to demand her own ride, for the sake of sanity and sobriety (drunken Uno, anyone?). In sum, Made in Hong Kong is a perfect post-tour souvenir for devoted Nightwish fans to while away the wait for the band's next studio album. ~ Eduardo Rivadavia
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Rock - Released June 2, 2006 | Nuclear Blast

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Rock - Released November 29, 2013 | Nuclear Blast

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Rock - Released August 15, 2007 | Roadrunner Records

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Metal - Released August 24, 2007 | Nuclear Blast

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Metal - Released March 9, 2018 | Nuclear Blast

Booklet
Released as their 20th anniversary world tour began, Decades marks the recorded history of Nightwish, Finland's most popular symphonic gothic prog metallers. Containing 22 tracks spread over two discs, it was compiled by founding keyboardist and songwriter Tuomas Holopainen. It's a curious document. First, it contains no new material. The closest thing comes in the form of the demo version of "Nightwish" instead of the studio version found on their debut album. Everything else comes straight from the studio catalog. This presents a conundrum, of course. Who might purchase Decades? Reductively, it comes down to two groups of people: completists who need absolutely everything (since this band is no stranger to compilations) and the blessed, daring souls curious enough based on a few songs, an album, or reading an article. Legacy Nightwish fans will argue endlessly about the choices Holopainen made, and what he left off ("The Phantom of the Opera," "Dark Chest of Wonders," and "Over the Hills," for starters). Some fans have argued vociferously that Nightwish should have simply re-recorded these songs with current vocalist Floor Jansen. Wisely, Holopainen lets the originals stand; his twist, apart from song choices was in how he sequenced Decades: in reverse chronological order. This means, of course, that the material from the Jansen era is in the minority, as she was preceded by founding vocalist Tarja Tarunen and Anette Olzon. The first arguable choice is the set's leadoff: the 24-minute "The Greatest Show on Earth" from 2015's Endless Forms Most Beautiful. The other two of its tracks here, "Élan" and "My Walden," might have been better complemented by a shorter choice or even two more, had he left the opener off. Interestingly, only two were culled from Imaginaerum ("Storytime" and I Want My Tears Back"). On the other side, the set is peppered with great singles including "Amaranth," "Nemo," and "Wish I Had an Angel," along with other tracks that reveal the band's effortlessness with shifting styles, textures, and drama, including "The Poet and the Pendulum." Disc two's 13 cuts offer a number of real highlights: the inclusion of "Ghost Love Score" to open disc two is a particularly welcome choice. Other excellent picks include the mighty "The Kinslayer," "Sleeping Sun," and "The Carpenter." The decision not to include even one unreleased or new track is troubling, as it would provide a real reason for fans to purchase the set. That said, what is here is a solid, excellent representation of what Nightwish have accomplished in their long, pioneering career. The curious will find this a more than adequate introduction to the band's powerful, mysterious music. ~ Thom Jurek
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Metal - Released January 1, 2018 | Nuclear Blast