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Classical - Released January 1, 2005 | PentaTone

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Hi-Res Audio
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Classical - Released January 1, 2004 | PentaTone

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Hi-Res Audio
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Classical - Released January 1, 2002 | PentaTone

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Hi-Res Audio
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Classical - Released June 1, 2008 | PentaTone

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Hi-Res Audio
Joining Yakov Kreizberg and the Netherlands Philharmonic Orchestra's previously released recordings of Dvorák's Eighth and Ninth symphonies is a recording of the same composer's Sixth Symphony coupled with his symphonic poem The Water Goblin. Like its predecessors, it is simply superb. Kreizberg's conducting has plenty of drive and power, but it's also well-shaped and completely under control. He's able to sculpt phrases and paragraphs without impeding the forward motion of the music, and the work's radiant lyricism is as apparent in its serene central Adagio as it is in its racing closing Allegro con spirito. The Amsterdam-based orchestra plays with tremendous strength and integrity for Kreizberg, sticking with him in the symphony's brutal Scherzo and shining for him in the symphonic poem's more lurid passages. Although there have been many other superlative recordings of Dvorák's Sixth over the years -- the luminous Kertész, the ebullient Belohlávek, the gregarious Mackerras -- Kreizberg's deserves to be heard by anyone who loves the music. PentaTone's super audio sound is deep, clear, detailed, and unaccountably present. © TiVo
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Classical - Released June 26, 2020 | PentaTone

Hi-Res Booklet
Marc Albrecht and the Netherlands Philharmonic Orchestra present Zemlinsky’s lush symphonic poem Die Seejungfrau. Zemlinsky was a child of fin-de-siècle Vienna, who for decades has been overshadowed by colleagues such as Gustav Mahler – the man who married Alma, the woman Zemlinsky also loved - and Arnold Schoenberg – the man who would later become his brother-in-law. In recent times, Zemlinsky is finally gaining the recognition he deserves. The same applies to his symphonic poem Die Seejungfrau, based on Andersen’s Little Mermaid story. Zemlinsky withdrew the score after its premiere in 1905; the three movements were first reunited in the 1980s thanks to scholars, after which the piece could start its second life. Die Seejungfrau seems inspired by Zemlinsky’s love in vain for Alma, clothed in cinematic fin-de-siècle music with Debussy-like evocations of the sea. © Pentatone
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Opera - Released October 26, 2012 | Challenge Classics

Hi-Res Booklet
Challenge Classics' audiophile presentation of Richard Strauss' one-act opera Elektra deserves serious attention for the excitement of the Netherlands Opera's production, which was recorded in October 2011, and for the excellence of the SACD/DSD format, which gives listeners real value for the price. The cast, which features Evelyn Herlitzius as Elektra, and includes Michaela Schuster as Clytemnestra, Camilla Nylund as Chrysothemis, Hubert Delamboye as Aegisthus, and Gerd Grochowski as Orestes, meets Strauss' extreme vocal demands, though Herlitzius especially possesses the stamina and emotional power to carry her role to its grim end. Marc Albrecht, a respected authority on Strauss' operatic music, leads the Netherlands Philharmonic Orchestra with energy and urgency, so the suspense and violence of the intense score come across with disturbing vividness and considerable shock value, particularly in the explosive brass and percussion, the grinding dissonances, and in the truly sinister sonorities in the low register. While it is relatively short and still recognizably tonal (despite Strauss' attempt to push his music to the edge of atonality), Elektra is not an easy opera to appreciate because of its psychological complexity. Furthermore, the libretto is only provided in German in the hardcover package, so listeners who require a translation will need to look elsewhere. But if any modern recording can be recommended as a valuable introduction to this work, this one certainly works well for its sustained power and transparent reproduction. © TiVo
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Classical - Released April 1, 2006 | Brilliant Classics

Jaap van Zweden and the Netherlands Philharmonic Orchestra turn in technically assured, expressively nuanced, and sonically rich performances on this album of Johannes Brahms' Symphony No. 3 in F major, Op. 90, and the Symphony No. 4 in E minor, Op. 98, so it's no wonder they have been reissued several times by Brilliant Classics, both singly and in box sets. One should not think, however, that these are the best performances available simply because of the frequency of releases, and beginners new to Brahms' symphonies would be well advised to seek out the truly great historic recordings by Toscanini, Furtwängler, or Walter, as well as some of the excellent modern renditions by Giulini, Abbado, and Bychkov, among others, before settling on a favorite. Certainly, van Zweden's earnest efforts should not be compared too closely or harshly with those of the maestros mentioned above, but he does a serviceable job of presenting these symphonies with mental clarity, musicality, and fidelity to the scores, and anyone who needs a good recording for study purposes will find this CD more than adequate and even quite attractive in the bargain. But van Zweden's emotional temperature is fairly cool, and he doesn't achieve great heights or depths in these performances, so they don't bring the full force of Brahms' profoundly Romantic expression across and instead feel a bit distanced and more intellectual than intuitive. The recorded sound is warm and full, though it is a little dense in spots where Brahms' orchestration is already somewhat opaque and in need of careful engineering. © TiVo
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Classical - Released March 1, 2011 | Brilliant Classics

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Classical - To be released July 24, 2020 | TACET Musikproduktion

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