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Alternative & Indie - Released August 30, 2013 | Anti - Epitaph

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 4F de Télérama - 4 étoiles Rock and Folk - Hi-Res Audio
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Alternative & Indie - Released June 1, 2018 | Anti - Epitaph

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In 2016 Neko Case played the trio card with her peers KD Lang and Laura Veirs, for an album that injected her career with much-needed ardour. Two years later, she’s back with a solo album, following The Worse Things Get, The Harder I Fight, The Harder I Fight, The More I Love You, released in 2013. For Hell-On, she reveals herself more than ever, matures and strikes us like thunder! In her compositions, the singer is used to delivering tales and stories that resemble her. But here, Neko Case unveils a much more feminist side. Beyond being a strong woman, she has become a wild character, unpredictable and unleashed, that simply does not hesitate to make love to you… and break a few of your ribs at the same time… A proper obscure and quirky waltz, switching back and forth between alternative country, psychedelic rock and pop ditties. One thing is certain, she’s the one leading the dance! Not forgetting the damage she does with her voice that assimilates every emotion without never losing control. At least that’s an unwavering certainty, as opposed to her compositions that don’t always operate under the verse and chorus structure. But Neko Case also knows when to take risks and get out of her comfort zone, working with unexpected artists like her co-producer Bjorn Yttling, known for his collaborations with Primal Scream and Lykke Li. Hell-On also bears the mark of a tragedy: the burning of her house, from which nothing could be salvaged! Not surprising then to hear a touch of rage in her singing or to witness her lack of fear placing lit-up cigarettes in her hair or lay down in a bed full of snakes in her music videos. A brand-new woman has just emerged from the bowels of the earth and is singing Hell-On! © Clara Bismuth/Qobuz
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Alternative & Indie - Released April 15, 2008 | Anti - Epitaph

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Alternative & Indie - Released June 1, 2018 | Anti - Epitaph

In 2016 Neko Case played the trio card with her peers KD Lang and Laura Veirs, for an album that injected her career with much-needed ardour. Two years later, she’s back with a solo album, following The Worse Things Get, The Harder I Fight, The Harder I Fight, The More I Love You, released in 2013. For Hell-On, she reveals herself more than ever, matures and strikes us like thunder! In her compositions, the singer is used to delivering tales and stories that resemble her. But here, Neko Case unveils a much more feminist side. Beyond being a strong woman, she has become a wild character, unpredictable and unleashed, that simply does not hesitate to make love to you… and break a few of your ribs at the same time… A proper obscure and quirky waltz, switching back and forth between alternative country, psychedelic rock and pop ditties. One thing is certain, she’s the one leading the dance! Not forgetting the damage she does with her voice that assimilates every emotion without never losing control. At least that’s an unwavering certainty, as opposed to her compositions that don’t always operate under the verse and chorus structure. But Neko Case also knows when to take risks and get out of her comfort zone, working with unexpected artists like her co-producer Bjorn Yttling, known for his collaborations with Primal Scream and Lykke Li. Hell-On also bears the mark of a tragedy: the burning of her house, from which nothing could be salvaged! Not surprising then to hear a touch of rage in her singing or to witness her lack of fear placing lit-up cigarettes in her hair or lay down in a bed full of snakes in her music videos. A brand-new woman has just emerged from the bowels of the earth and is singing Hell-On! © Clara Bismuth/Qobuz
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Alternative & Indie - Released October 1, 2007 | Anti - Epitaph

While the spare and often haunted sound of Neko Case's home-recorded Canadian Amp EP seemed at the time like a late-night detour from alt-country's leading songbird of the North, listening to Case's first full-length album following Canadian Amp suggests it may have been the first step along a new and different path for her. Blacklisted is a considerably darker and more understated affair than The Virginian or Furnace Room Lullaby, and its sometimes stark, sometimes elegant 3 a.m. sound is informed as much by pop, jazz, and blues flavors as the country & western-slanted melodies of her first two solo albums. Which isn't to say Blacklisted is a total departure for Neko Case; her big, bold, but silky smooth voice is still a thing of beauty, and if anything, she's still learning more remarkable things she can do with it, with the result being some of her finest and most insightful performances to date. And Case continues to grow as a songwriter; penning most of the album all by herself, Case is a lyricist willing to answer to both her heart and her head, and she had a fine ear for a melody to boot. With Joey Burns and John Convertino of Calexico, Howe Gelb of Giant Sand, Dallas Good of the Sadies, and Kelly Hogan all contributing to Blacklisted, Neko Case has crafted an album whose quiet drift only adds to its power; it's hard to say if hanging out with Nick Cave on tour had much of an influence on her, but this disc sounds a bit like Case's version of The Boatman's Call, a personal exploration of the heart and soul that proves sad and beautiful can often walk hand in hand. Highly recommended. ~ Mark Deming
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Alternative & Indie - Released February 28, 2009 | Anti - Epitaph

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International Pop - Released November 27, 2015 | Anti - Epitaph

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Alternative & Indie - Released October 1, 2007 | Anti - Epitaph

It would be easy to call Neko Case alt-country's answer to k.d. lang; after all, they both began their career in Canada (although Case was raised in America), both came into country music through artier pursuits, and both blend trad-style twang with a modernist lyrical perspective. But Case also has a couple more important things in common with lang -- she has a superb voice that's as big as all outdoors, and there's nothing at all ironic about her love for the luxurious sadness of classic country & western. Case fronts a dramatically revamped line-up of Boyfriends on her second solo album, Furnace Room Lullaby, and it's even stronger and more impressive than her fine debut set, The Virginian. Case co-wrote all of the album's 12 songs, and the material strikes a more deeply personal note this time out, from the busted romance of "Set Out Running" and "We've Never Met" to the road-weary and unsentimental nostalgia of "Thrice All American" and "South Tacoma Way" (not many artists could put a lump in your throat at the notion of a Wal-Mart replacing the old downtown, but Case does it here). Case's vocals are superb from front to back, as smooth and fiery as good brandy, and her revolving circle of musicians (including Ron Sexsmith and Kelly Hogan on backing vocals) are subtle and beautifully evocative, balancing sorrow and good times with an easy grace. Dozens of rock artists have wrung cheap laughs from the sound and feel of classic country, but Neko Case understands the honest emotions and working-class poetry Loretta Lynn and Dolly Parton brought to their best music, and if her own take on such things is a bit different, Furnace Room Lullaby makes clear how deeply she cares for this music, and confirms her status as one of alt-country's strongest artists. ~ Mark Deming
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Alternative & Indie - Released January 29, 2008 | Anti - Epitaph

In the press release that accompanies Neko Case's 2004 live album, The Tigers Have Spoken, the singer (and her record company) insist quite strongly that this isn't meant to be a stopgap release on the way to her next studio project. To be blunt, Case protests a bit much on this issue -- an album featuring two re-recorded originals and five covers out of 11 tracks is carrying an awful lot of padding for something intended to be a proper "new" release. But if The Tigers Have Spoken is really intended to keep fans occupied until Case finishes her next project, she thankfully hasn't abandoned her standards of quality control along the way, and delivers some splendid music on this disc. Recorded over the course of three gigs in the spring of 2004, The Tigers Have Spoken features Case backed by the Sadies, whose web of deep, lonesome twang fits Case's repertoire like a glove, with Jon Rauhouse sitting in on pedal steel with his usual grace and flawless feel, and Kelly Hogan and Carolyn Mark contributing backing vocals that are little short of glorious. But the reason Neko Case is headlining over this stellar cast is because she has one of the finest voices to emerge from pop music in recent memory, and she's in firm command of her instrument on these performances. Allowing herself more room to rock than on 2002's Blacklisted, Case rips it up on covers of classic tunes by Buffy Sainte-Marie, Loretta Lynn, and the Shangri-Las, and "The Tigers Have Spoken" and "Hex" show Case isn't saving all her good new songs for the next album. Maybe Case is biding her time with The Tigers Have Spoken, but she sure isn't wasting it -- if it's a relatively minor effort, it still sounds like the work of a major artist, and there's lots of pleasure to be found in it. ~ Mark Deming
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Alternative & Indie - Released August 30, 2013 | Anti - Epitaph

Booklet
The cover photo for 2009's Middle Cyclone found indie rock civil defense siren Neko Case warning the masses of potentially deadly weather from atop the hood of a 1967 Mercury Cougar. It was a striking image, and one that perfectly captured both the album's quiet might and her distinctive Patsy Cline-meets-Rosie the Riveter allure. Once again barefoot and wielding a samurai sword, Case squares off against a trio of serpents on the front jacket of 2013's like-minded, yet decidedly more adventurous The Worse Things Get, The Harder I Fight, The Harder I Fight, The More I Love You, a 12-track horn of plenty that taunts, comforts, bruises, and empowers, and like all of her previous offerings, rewards repeated spins with a multitude of riches. Her most vulnerable and permeable collection of songs to date, it's not quite Neko Case unchained, but it's certainly as emotionally raw as it is willfully enigmatic, especially on quieter numbers like "Nearly Midnight, Honolulu," "I'm from Nowhere," and an airy, evocative cover of Nico's "Afraid," all three of which benefit from the barest of arrangements. That said, when Case decides to go big, she doesn’t skimp on the trimmings (guest spots are populated by the likes of M. Ward, Howe Gelb, Mudhoney's Steve Turner, and members of Calexico, Los Lobos, My Morning Jacket, Visqueen, and of course, the New Pornographers and longtime shadow Kelly Hogan), but her version of opulence is mired in great taste, which affords superb, midtempo offerings like "Night Still Comes, "Ragtime," and "Local Girl," straight-up dirt road rockers such as "City Swans," and the punk-infused, delightfully subversive single "Man" ("I'm a man, that's what you raised me to be/ I'm not your identity crisis/This was planned") the room they need to flex their considerable muscle while maintaining an air of warm, almost casual bombast that invokes names like Sandy Denny and Dusty Springfield. It's some of her most instantly gratifying work as well, perfectly encapsulating all of her personas, from the erudite, whiskey-shooting provocateur to the sweet and soulful, small town crooner who sounds like she was plucked from the pages of a novel set in the antebellum north. Case has proven time and again that she has the songwriting chops to match her earthy, superlative voice, but never with such authority. ~ James Christopher Monger
$14.49

Alternative & Indie - Released August 30, 2013 | Anti - Epitaph

Booklet
The cover photo for 2009's Middle Cyclone found indie rock civil defense siren Neko Case warning the masses of potentially deadly weather from atop the hood of a 1967 Mercury Cougar. It was a striking image, and one that perfectly captured both the album's quiet might and her distinctive Patsy Cline-meets-Rosie the Riveter allure. Once again barefoot and wielding a samurai sword, Case squares off against a trio of serpents on the front jacket of 2013's like-minded, yet decidedly more adventurous The Worse Things Get, The Harder I Fight, The Harder I Fight, The More I Love You, a 12-track horn of plenty that taunts, comforts, bruises, and empowers, and like all of her previous offerings, rewards repeated spins with a multitude of riches. Her most vulnerable and permeable collection of songs to date, it's not quite Neko Case unchained, but it's certainly as emotionally raw as it is willfully enigmatic, especially on quieter numbers like "Nearly Midnight, Honolulu," "I'm from Nowhere," and an airy, evocative cover of Nico's "Afraid," all three of which benefit from the barest of arrangements. That said, when Case decides to go big, she doesn’t skimp on the trimmings (guest spots are populated by the likes of M. Ward, Howe Gelb, Mudhoney's Steve Turner, and members of Calexico, Los Lobos, My Morning Jacket, Visqueen, and of course, the New Pornographers and longtime shadow Kelly Hogan), but her version of opulence is mired in great taste, which affords superb, midtempo offerings like "Night Still Comes, "Ragtime," and "Local Girl," straight-up dirt road rockers such as "City Swans," and the punk-infused, delightfully subversive single "Man" ("I'm a man, that's what you raised me to be/ I'm not your identity crisis/This was planned") the room they need to flex their considerable muscle while maintaining an air of warm, almost casual bombast that invokes names like Sandy Denny and Dusty Springfield. It's some of her most instantly gratifying work as well, perfectly encapsulating all of her personas, from the erudite, whiskey-shooting provocateur to the sweet and soulful, small town crooner who sounds like she was plucked from the pages of a novel set in the antebellum north. Case has proven time and again that she has the songwriting chops to match her earthy, superlative voice, but never with such authority. ~ James Christopher Monger
Man

Alternative & Indie - Released June 24, 2013 | Anti - Epitaph

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Neko Case in the magazine
  • Neko Case, a modern Medusa
    Neko Case, a modern Medusa In 2016 Neko Case played the trio card with her peers KD Lang and Laura Veirs, for an album that injected her career with much-needed ardour. Two years later, she’s back with a solo album, followin...
  • case/lang/veirs
    case/lang/veirs Neko Case, k.d. lang and Laura Veirs come together for a powerful collaboration.