Categories :

Similar artists

Albums

CD$12.99

Pop - Released January 27, 2015 | Century Media

Birmingham England's Napalm Death have always managed to remain true to themselves as a band. Despite many musical phases -- some of which alienated early fans during the 1990s when they issued albums that deliberately experimented with production, melody, texture, and dynamics -- they have always managed to sound not only urgent, but have pushed extreme music to suit their aims as a group rather than the other way around. Apex Predator- Easy Meat is ND's 15th studio album. The tempos vary, from all-out thrash to absolutely menacing grindcore to something approaching industrial metal. There is a looking back on the album, but it's not musically. Lyrically, they address the same global capitalist greed as they did on Scum 27 years ago; in the meantime, capitalism has evolved and attached itself like a leech onto nearly all living things. The raging death metal grind in "Cesspits" addresses the plight of the world's poor, who are quite literally living in holes as the more fortunate masses turn a blind eye to their suffering. Barney Greenway is at his growling roaring best as guitarist Mitch Harris lays out a knotty amalgam of angular riffs and bends. Drummer Danny Herrera is in pure blastbeat fury. Elsewhere, on the title track, Greenway uses his low-end Gregorian-esque chant a cappella layered amid reverb to slowly enter the emerging dirge led by Herrera's tom-toms, the full-on throb in Shane Embury's bass and, eventually, Harris' sparse yet groove-laden riff. "Bloodless Coup" is full-on thrashing death metal. "Hierarchies," an unhinged screamo orgy of riffs and grooves with a twisted, bridge, underscores how subtle and wide-ranging societal inequalities are along class and racial lines. The last of these 14 tracks, "Adversarial/Copulating Snakes," is also the longest at over five minutes -- an eternity for ND. It sums up not only the album's lyric themes, but its musical ones as well. The pace is not only intense, it's insane, and Greenway's screams and guttural roars seem to come from his marrow. Harris' galloping riffs are pushed into the red by the rhythm section. There are no signs of creative slowdown here. If anything, Apex Predator- Easy Meat ups the ante on all their post-2000 albums. How they top this is anybody's guess. Completely unrelenting; thoroughly amazing. © Thom Jurek /TiVo
CD$12.99

Metal - Released March 30, 2018 | Century Media

CD$13.99

Metal - Released January 1, 2003 | Peaceville Records

Napalm Death has always been an interesting anomaly in the metal underground: generally considered to be the inventors of grindcore, the band eventually became a ragged patchwork of punk, death metal, and hardcore that was simultaneously sloppy, technical, unwaveringly ugly, and downright vicious. And political -- proof being this recording made at a 2002 London animal rights benefit gig. Hence the anomaly; while slaughter, fantasy, and war are thematic crutches for much of the metal underground, Napalm is intent on righting the injustices of the world. Punishment in Capitals does a decent job of capturing the group's focus and intensity on-stage, the band rampaging through 28 songs in 90 minutes, from haphazardly arranged early donkey punches "Scum" and "Lucid Fairytale" to latter-day pneumatic drillers "Can't Play Won't Pay" and "Breed to Breathe." Visually, the live show is more than adequate, with enough camera angles to keep diehards relatively interested throughout, even if sonically the live mix is a bit gutted (strangely, the between-song chatter of singer Mark "Barney" Greenway is mixed much louder than his actual during-song vocalizations). Strictly for droolingly devoted Napalm drinkers is a jittery, D.I.Y., 45-minute documentary tacked on as a bonus feature, with mostly Barney-centric interviews covering relatively interesting territory (the band's political views) and the transcendentally mundane (what the band members eat before a show). Also added to the fray are two grainy cuts camcordered in Tokyo in 1996, and a half-dozen more culled from a particularly frenzied gig in Santiago, Chile, in 1997. Long-in-the-tooth Napalm punters will find plenty of meat and potatoes to consume in Punishment in Capitals, and the general no-bones-about-it approach nicely conveys the compelling grit of the hard-working and rightfully well-respected band at its center. © John Serba /TiVo
CD$18.49

Pop - Released February 27, 2012 | Century Media

CD$12.99

Metal - Released July 13, 2005 | Century Media

Had you dared to suggest back in the late '80s that Napalm Death -- not one of their supposedly more stable peers -- would be the ones to survive through thick and thin and become elder statesmen of extreme metal, you might have been laughed right out of the meat market. But here they are, still thriving decades on from grindcore's violent birth and 11 (that's 11!) studio albums into their career, despite continued challenges like the long-mooted, now seemingly official, departure of long-serving guitarist Jesse Pintado after a decade of work alongside mainstay Mitch Harris. Of course with this elder statesmen status comes the matter of (cough!) maturity, and that right there may be the single word that defines 2005's The Code Is Red...Long Live the Code, whether Napalm likes it or not. It also serves as the dividing line between those fans who have either stuck with or recently discovered the band, and those for whom Napalm Death may as well have died an excruciatingly painful, er, napalm death after releasing those two grindcore-defining first albums: Scum and From Enslavement to Obliteration. The latter are encouraged to take a hike right now, because even ultra-brief new punishments like "Right You Are" and "Pay for the Privilege of Breathing" only barely recall those early years, of which enduring bassist Shane Embury is the only remnant. Rather, though signature new material like "Silence Is Deafening," "Climate Controllers," and "Striding Purposefully Backwards" retains a concerted punk edge in its riffing and arrangements (a trend begun with 2000's revitalizing Enemy of the Music Business), Napalm's maturity (there's that word again), improved technical abilities, as well as a cleaner, more sophisticated production can't help but manifest themselves throughout this set. And yet, even as they prove that reinstating a certain punk ethos still won't get you back to Kansas again, these tracks carry an implicit challenge, daring even the most cynical of listeners to remain unmoved by the gigantic riffs unleashed by the title track or the colossal "All Hail the Grey Dawn" -- not to mention Barney Greenway's still inimitable throat of Armageddon. At this stage, all that's left to comment on are the guest appearances from Hatebreed's Jamie Jasta (pretty nondescript, somewhere in "Instruments of Persuasion"), old Carcass sparring mate Jeff Walker (more obvious in "Pledge Yourself to You"), and lending his unmistakable warble to "The Great and the Good," none other than Jello Biafra. In sum, while most certainly not likely to reconvert old-school grindcore purists, The Code Is Red...Long Live the Code shows Napalm Death in finer form than arguably any of their '90s efforts and lacking little in terms of the uncompromising fury and intelligence that helped make their name. ~ Eduardo Rivadavia
CD$12.99

Metal - Released July 13, 2009 | Century Media

Love or loathe them, you have to respect Napalm Death for sustaining such sheer ferocity, intensity, and volume over 14 albums. Purists complain that the band lapsed in the mid-'90s, sacrilegiously flirting with melody, texture, and conventional rock structures, but Napalm's post-millennial releases have recovered the edge perhaps lacking on records like Diatribes, without going backwards. As Time Waits for No Slave demonstrates, Napalm Death hold to their core values of extreme noise terrorism while also keeping things fresh on each new album. That's evident, for instance, in the atmospheric elements punctuating the assault: ominous vocal coloring on "Fallacy Dominion," dark introductory ambience on "Passive Tense," and a doomy choral conclusion to "Downbeat Clique." Mitch Harris' riffing takes a few atypical turns as "Work to Rule" fleetingly visits black metal territory and the title track's discordant guitar evokes Sonic Youth. Lyrically, though, it's business as usual. The state of the world in 2009 obviously isn't cause for cheer, but at least it gives primordial growler Barney Greenway plenty to rant about: "Life and Limb" denounces torture as Embury and Herrera's rhythm section veers between Swans-like pounding and explosive acceleration; "Strong-Arm" embraces nonviolence; "Diktat" attacks the policing of morality; and the title track rages against the capitalist machine. "On the Brink of Extinction" even tackles ecology and evolution. Ironically, while the punishing music and Greenway's indecipherable, violent delivery suggest otherwise, the sentiments behind many of these songs are actually no different from those once expressed by docile hippies strumming acoustic guitars. And although the metal genre is inextricably linked with an alienated, individualist spirit, Napalm have been relatively anomalous in having a communal, essentially socialist outlook, rooted in their original anarcho-punk influences. Time Waits for No Slave finds Napalm Death keeping faith with their past, albeit without stagnating: within extreme metal's seemingly limited parameters, the band finds modest ways to keep its sound energized and vital. © Wilson Neate /TiVo
CD$6.99

Rock - Released November 25, 2016 | Earache Records Ltd

CD$18.49

Metal - Released July 13, 2006 | Century Media

When Napalm Death first hit the scene in the '80s, plenty of detractors must have thought that their brand of extreme metal was just a passing fad, and would soon go away. Now 20 years later, guess who's having the last laugh (especially since the group has long been considered one of the first-ever grindcore bands, and easily one of the most influential/copied metal bands of the era)? And despite 2006's Smear Campaign being the group's umpteenth release, the band's assault-on-your-senses approach is still very much intact -- particularly evident by singer Mark "Barney" Greenway, who still lives to scream his head off at every given opportunity (especially on such tracks as "Sink Fast, Let Go" and "Freedom Is the Wage of Sin"). Some artists enjoy reinventing themselves with each and every release. Not Napalm Death, which is reassuring in a way (you know exactly what lies therein with each successive brutal release) -- and Smear Campaign certainly doesn't disappoint. ~ Greg Prato
CD$7.99

Metal - Released January 1, 2002 | Peaceville Records

The old dog might not have learned any new tricks, but that doesn't mean that it can't improve on what it already figured out. When Napalm Death started, it was one of the fastest guns in the west, whereas the intermediate era of the group ushered in slower tempos but higher levels of intensity. Order of the Leech eschews the relative experimentation of the preceding Enemy of the Music Business, and instead it artfully combines the reckless alacrity of the band's youth with the lessons in extremities it mastered with age into a record that's the best of both worlds -- blazingly fast, yet chock-full of interesting ideas. Danny Herrera has to be considered one of the best drummers the genre's produced, as his performance here is nothing short of Dave Lombardo-esque in its power; meanwhile, Barney Greenway's vocals are overpowering as he returns to the band's roots of biting political and social commentary throughout the record, which shifts into fifth gear right out of the box with "Continuing War on Stupidity" and doesn't slow down for a second. © Brian O'Neill /TiVo
CD$8.99

Rock - Released November 10, 2014 | Earache Records Ltd

HI-RES$12.99
CD$8.99

Metal - Released February 7, 2020 | Century Media Records

Hi-Res
CD$8.99

Rock - Released April 19, 2019 | Earache Records Ltd

CD$8.99

Rock - Released May 14, 2012 | Earache Records Ltd

CD$8.99

Rock - Released April 23, 2012 | Earache Records Ltd

CD$9.99

Rock - Released July 1, 1987 | Earache Records Ltd

CD$8.99

Rock - Released March 5, 2012 | Earache Records Ltd

CD$8.99

Rock - Released March 25, 2009 | Earache Records Ltd

Surprisingly accessible for Napalm Death in places, Diatribes boasts some strong riff writing. The straightforward thrasher "Greed Killing," which opens the album, proves that Napalm Death can crush most any mainstream metal band, but the kings of grindcore are still up to their old tricks. They do sink into clichéd predictability in some spots, but overall, Diatribes is a worthwhile outing. © Steve Huey /TiVo
CD$8.99

Rock - Released March 25, 2009 | Earache Records Ltd

CD$8.99

Rock - Released March 25, 2009 | Earache Records Ltd

CD$8.99

Rock - Released March 25, 2009 | Earache Records Ltd