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Alternative & Indie - Released April 3, 2020 | Mystery Jets Records

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Alternative & Indie - Released January 15, 2016 | Caroline International

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Three years in the making, the London-based neo-psych-rockers fifth studio long player, and first with new bassist Jack Flanagan, is a sumptuous distillation of the myriad styles that Mystery Jets have been weaving in and out of over the years, from the proggy post-punk of Making Dens and Zootime to the open road Americana of Radlands. Always an inward looking, albeit reliably quirky gang of retro-casters, Curve of the Earth finds the Jets assessing their place in the universe via nine incrementally protracted set pieces that invoke Soft Bulletin-era Flaming Lips, early Radiohead, and of course, Pink Floyd. Self-produced in a homespun studio in an abandoned button factory, Curve of the Earth wastes little time in setting the controls for the heart of the sun with the lead single "Telomare," a big, atmospheric blast of anthemic, mid-'90s stadium rock that segues nicely into the equally dreamy "Bombay Blue." From there things bounce back and forth between the bucolic and the sublime, peppered with plenty of crafty guitar bits that run the gamut from angular to downright noodly. Guitarist William Rees noted in the LP's press release that the group has "been through quite a lot in the last couple of years and there have been certain realizations that come with being in a band that has been playing together for two decades," and that sentiment is most deeply felt on the emotionally charged "Taken by the Tide" and the meditative"1985" (the year of frontman Blaine Harrison's birth), both of which strike the perfect balance between immediacy and nostalgia, which is something that Mystery Jets have been slowly but surely perfecting since 2003. © James Christopher Monger. /TiVo
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Alternative & Indie - Released March 21, 2008 | 679 Recordings UK. Ltd.

A surprisingly different affair from the prog/post-punk leanings of their impressive first album Making Dens, Twenty One sees Mystery Jets enthusiastically embracing the '80s retro craze so ubiquitous in the 2000s musical scene. Two key factors are at play here: first, father of singer Blaine Harrison, Henry, is no longer a full-time member, and the sudden drop in the band's average age comes with a much more youthful sound and lyrical outlook. Secondly, electronica DJ Erol Alkan steps up to produce, and his entrance is dutifully accompanied by a markedly dance-oriented new direction, complete with huge bouncing basslines, impossibly tacky synths, and all sorts of gimmicky effects. If any of this seems dismissive, think again, because Twenty One is an utterly terrific collection of pop songs that only professional cynics or musical snobs could possibly dislike. Mystery Jets take the hyperkinetic catchiness of Franz Ferdinand, but replace the Glasgow lads' arty irony with hopeless romanticism -- and you cannot help loving them all the more for it. An earnest and engaging singer comments on a series of boy-girl vignettes, supported by fantastically layered background vocals, ringing guitars, unerring melodic hooks galore, and instantly memorable choruses. The recipe may be well-known, but what a joy it is to find it alive and well in the hands of master chefs. Only a couple of more reflective tracks here and there hint at the band's past (and considerably diverse talents), and still function wonderfully in the context of the album. Yet the stars of the show are the hefty handful of perfect singles including "Hideaway," "Young Love" (a lovely, worldweary duet with Laura Marling), "Hand Me Down," "MJ," "Half in Love with Elizabeth," and best of all, "Two Doors Down," an absolutely irrepressible singalong that, had it been released in 1983, it would now be obligatory for all megahits compilations, among artists like the Human League, Cyndi Lauper, the Bangles, the Cars, Prince, and the rest of the usual suspects. A quarter-of-a-century later, Twenty One may not break new ground, but is without a doubt an instant delight for fans of great pop music done the British way, as well as one of 2008's best and most lovable albums. © Mariano Prunes /TiVo
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Alternative & Indie - Released December 4, 2020 | Mystery Jets Records

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Alternative & Indie - Released April 30, 2012 | Rough Trade

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Alternative & Indie - Released July 13, 2010 | Rough Trade

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Rock - Released June 6, 2006 | 679 Recordings

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Alternative & Indie - Released May 21, 2020 | Mystery Jets Records

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Alternative & Indie - Released January 15, 2016 | Caroline International

Three years in the making, the London-based neo-psych-rockers fifth studio long player, and first with new bassist Jack Flanagan, is a sumptuous distillation of the myriad styles that Mystery Jets have been weaving in and out of over the years, from the proggy post-punk of Making Dens and Zootime to the open road Americana of Radlands. Always an inward looking, albeit reliably quirky gang of retro-casters, Curve of the Earth finds the Jets assessing their place in the universe via nine incrementally protracted set pieces that invoke Soft Bulletin-era Flaming Lips, early Radiohead, and of course, Pink Floyd. Self-produced in a homespun studio in an abandoned button factory, Curve of the Earth wastes little time in setting the controls for the heart of the sun with the lead single "Telomare," a big, atmospheric blast of anthemic, mid-'90s stadium rock that segues nicely into the equally dreamy "Bombay Blue." From there things bounce back and forth between the bucolic and the sublime, peppered with plenty of crafty guitar bits that run the gamut from angular to downright noodly. Guitarist William Rees noted in the LP's press release that the group has "been through quite a lot in the last couple of years and there have been certain realizations that come with being in a band that has been playing together for two decades," and that sentiment is most deeply felt on the emotionally charged "Taken by the Tide" and the meditative"1985" (the year of frontman Blaine Harrison's birth), both of which strike the perfect balance between immediacy and nostalgia, which is something that Mystery Jets have been slowly but surely perfecting since 2003. © James Christopher Monger. /TiVo
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Rock - Released June 5, 2012 | Rough Trade under license to Mystery Jets Partnership for North America

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Alternative & Indie - Released June 26, 2020 | Mystery Jets Records

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Alternative & Indie - Released June 9, 2017 | Caroline International

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Alternative & Indie - Released April 22, 2013 | Transgressive Records

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Alternative & Indie - Released April 11, 2007 | Dim Mak Records

The music of English indie rockers Mystery Jets bears resemblances to early 21st-century post-punk revival contemporaries Franz Ferdinand and Bloc Party, but there's also an eccentric edge and psychedelic flavor to their sound that recalls Syd Barrett-era Pink Floyd. Both strains are evident on 2007's DIAMONDS IN THE DARK, an EP that packs a serious punch over its mere four-song duration. The title track is the stand-out, but "Crosswords" and a cover of Bloc Party's "Pioneers" make this a rousing, worthwhile listen. © TiVo
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Alternative & Indie - Released May 8, 2007 | Dim Mak Records

Other than Spirit and the Spanic Boys, father-son duos are rare in rock & roll, which gives the U.K. experimental rockers Mystery Jets a leg up right away: lead singer and keyboardist Blaine Harrison is the son of lead guitarist Henry Harrison. It's handy that they have a hook like that for reviewers to latch onto, because it can be difficult for listeners to get their head around the band's full-length debut on its own terms. Zootime is filled with quirky, interesting pop songs, but each seems to be in a different style from the others. For example, "You Can't Fool Me Dennis" sounds like an early, Barry Andrews-era XTC song as covered by Franz Ferdinand: the danceable stomp of the rhythm section keeps the spiraling tune from shooting off in a dozen different directions at once, but only just barely. Meanwhile, the first single "Zoo Time" has the cracked, disorienting post-punk-psychedelia vibe of a classic Teardrop Explodes single, but given an extremely contemporary electronic edge. Then there's the handful of songs that recall Kate Bush and/or Atom Heart Mother-era Pink Floyd. Honestly, none of it makes a lick of sense, but unlike, say, the Beta Band -- whose entire shtick was that the parts of their music never fit into a coherent whole -- there's a shapeliness to Zootime that suggests the record was constructed from some inscrutable blueprint that's just naggingly out of reach. [Zootime was constructed using 9 songs from the band's UK release Making Dens and three others (including the energetic romp "Scarecrows in the Rain") taken from singles and EP releases]. © Stewart Mason /TiVo
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Alternative & Indie - Released October 26, 2018 | Caroline International (License External)

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Alternative & Indie - Released March 14, 2011 | Rough Trade