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Alternative & Indie - Released April 2, 2013 | Sub Pop Records

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Rock - Released September 19, 2018 | Sub Pop Records

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Alternative & Indie - Released September 20, 2019 | Sub Pop Records

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Alternative & Indie - Released July 14, 2009 | Rhino - Warner Records

By 1992, grunge was becoming rock's new Flavor of the Month, and Mudhoney, being the naturally contrary types that they were, seemed to be getting a bit bored with it; besides, after several years of roadwork, the band had gained enough speed and precision to allow the garage rock and old-school punk flavors to rise to the surface of their aural cocktail (or, more appropriately, their aural Trash Can Punch). Piece of Cake was the band's major-label debut, but you wouldn't have guessed that by listening to it; Conrad Uno's production is as no-frills as ever, and the short bursts of goofy noise and techno parodies that punctuate the album make it clear Mudhoney were taking themselves (and their career) no more seriously than they ever had. If those looking for the big shaggy sloppiness of "Touch Me I'm Sick" or "You Got It" might feel a bit let down by Piece of Cake, there's a snot-nosed fury to "No End in Sight" and "Suck You Dry" that makes it clear these guys were always a punk band at heart (albeit a punk band who really liked Blue Cheer), and if you're looking for heaviness, "Ritzville" and "I'm Spun" will convince you they hadn't forgotten how to drop that D tuning. Faster and fiercer than ever, but no less fuzzy or messed-up, Piece of Cake proved Mudhoney's palate was a few shades broader than some folks might have expected, but without turning their backs on the glorious ugliness that was always their stock-in-trade. ~ Mark Deming
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Alternative & Indie - Released September 20, 2019 | Sub Pop Records

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Rock - Released September 19, 2018 | Sub Pop Records

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Alternative & Indie - Released September 19, 2018 | Sub Pop Records

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Rock - Released September 11, 1998 | Reprise

On their fourth release for Reprise and seventh overall, Mudhoney show that they have absolutely no plans to mellow out in their old age. On Tomorrow Hit Today, the influential Seattle outfit harness their attack more than the full-throttle previous release, My Brother the Cow. Mark Arm still sings with all the attitude he can muster, while the others gleefully bash away at their instruments, creating tunes comparable to the enjoyable racket that the New York Dolls and Stooges laid down earlier. And it's very impressive that Mudhoney can still deliver true garage rock all these years later -- "I Have to Laugh" and the opening "A Thousand Forms of Mind" are classic Mudhoney stompers, and they mix it up with '60s surf ("Night of the Hunted") and blues-rock ("Move With the Wind"). Along with the Melvins, Mudhoney remained one of the few remaining Seattle originals, and Tomorrow Hit Today is one of their finest and most focused. ~ Greg Prato
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Alternative & Indie - Released September 19, 2018 | Sub Pop Records

“Fuck the planet. Screw your children. Get Rich! You win!” (Prosperity Gospel). The message is clear. As planned for 2018, Mudhoney has released another album. The year started off with a live album called LiE that captured the sweatiness of their European tour. It has been five years since the old geezers, who have been together for thirty years, released anything. Now in their fifties, they return to spit out some more of their cold punk music. Cool, stinky and brilliantly unique. The album starts out with some raw feedback and Mark Arm’s drunken voice on Nerve Attack. On the track Next Mass Extinction the group introduce a harmonica for a pub-rock atmosphere and on Hey Neanderfuck we get some lovely dirty guitar sounds. Digital Garbage, Mudhoney’s tenth album, features contemporary, mature grunge music that plays on the inexhaustible and endlessly caricatured theme that is Trump’s America. Very nice indeed. © Charlotte Saintoin/Qobuz
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Alternative & Indie - Released July 14, 2009 | Rhino - Warner Records

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Alternative & Indie - Released July 14, 2009 | Rhino - Warner Records

Mudhoney didn't invent grunge, but they were one of the first bands to truly define the style, and thanks to the bizarro-world logic that has defined their career, they seemed to loose interest in the stuff once you could actually make serious money playing it, ensuring that they wouldn't have to deal with the mainstream adulation that made followers like Nirvana, Pearl Jam, and Soundgarden into multi-platinum cash cows. By 1995, grunge's brief fling on the charts was pretty much over … just in time for Mudhoney to decide they liked the stuff again, and make the finest album of their career, My Brother the Cow. On My Brother the Cow, Mudhoney finally found a noisy middle ground where their fondness for Billy Childish and Blue Cheer could peacefully coexist, and the songs are less sludgy and more driving than their early classics, but with enough cheap stomp-box thunder to remind you of who's playing. A few years on the road had made Mudhoney a much stronger and tighter band, able to fully grasp the hard rock guitar figures they dearly loved to mock, but without falling into big rock pomp. And they came up with a dozen tunes that gave them plenty of room to sneer brilliantly (one of their greatest gifts), especially "Generation Spokesmodel," "F.D.K. (Fearless Doctor Killers)," and "Into Yer Shtik" (in which some nameless rock scene figure is advised to "blow your brains out too"). And as icing on the cake, the CD has the greatest hidden bonus track of all time. For better or worse, Mudhoney always played their game their own way, and they never played it better than on My Brother the Cow. ~ Mark Deming
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Alternative & Indie - Released July 14, 2009 | Rhino - Warner Records

Mudhoney didn't invent grunge, but they were one of the first bands to truly define the style, and thanks to the bizarro-world logic that has defined their career, they seemed to loose interest in the stuff once you could actually make serious money playing it, ensuring that they wouldn't have to deal with the mainstream adulation that made followers like Nirvana, Pearl Jam, and Soundgarden into multi-platinum cash cows. By 1995, grunge's brief fling on the charts was pretty much over … just in time for Mudhoney to decide they liked the stuff again, and make the finest album of their career, My Brother the Cow. On My Brother the Cow, Mudhoney finally found a noisy middle ground where their fondness for Billy Childish and Blue Cheer could peacefully coexist, and the songs are less sludgy and more driving than their early classics, but with enough cheap stomp-box thunder to remind you of who's playing. A few years on the road had made Mudhoney a much stronger and tighter band, able to fully grasp the hard rock guitar figures they dearly loved to mock, but without falling into big rock pomp. And they came up with a dozen tunes that gave them plenty of room to sneer brilliantly (one of their greatest gifts), especially "Generation Spokesmodel," "F.D.K. (Fearless Doctor Killers)," and "Into Yer Shtik" (in which some nameless rock scene figure is advised to "blow your brains out too"). And as icing on the cake, the CD has the greatest hidden bonus track of all time. For better or worse, Mudhoney always played their game their own way, and they never played it better than on My Brother the Cow. ~ Mark Deming
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Rock - Released September 19, 2018 | Sub Pop Records

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Rock - Released September 19, 2018 | Sub Pop Records

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Rock - Released September 19, 2018 | Sub Pop Records

The Lucky Ones marks Mudhoney's twentieth anniversary as a band, and in those two decades they've evolved from the guys that first brought the Seattle sound to loser record collectors around the world into a living anachronism as the Last Grunge Band Left Alive. But The Lucky Ones is a telling album to release on Mudhoney's big birthday, as it's the simplest and most unadorned album the band has released since 1995's overlooked masterpiece My Brother the Cow, and also the best. While Since We've Become Translucent and Under a Billion Suns proved Mudhoney had lost nothing in the way of fire or focus in the Twenty-First Century, The Lucky Ones is a brave step backwards into the primitivism of Superfuzz Bigmuff, and though Tucker Martine's engineering and mix is cleaner and better detailed than what Jack Endino brought to the band's early sessions, the approach seems much the same -- roll tape and lurch into the songs with all the muscle the boys can muster, and when the band kicks into fourth gear on "The Open Mind," "I'm Now" and the title cut, this stuff comes on as raw and messed-up as anything Mudhoney has unleashed in years, and Steve Turner's guitar work is little short of feral. The twisted sense of humor that informed much of Mudhoney's "classic period" is in short supply, but Mark Arm's command of the verbal sneer remains unsurpassed, and when he bellows "the lucky ones have already gone down," its with the voice of the leader of the last gang in town. For good or ill Mudhoney remain bloody but unbowed, heavyweight champions of fuzz and feedback, and on the evidence of The Lucky Ones, no one with any sense is going to challenge their title anytime soon; they built this strange machine, and they can drive it better than anyone before or since. ~ Mark Deming
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Rock - Released October 22, 1993 | Reprise

Described by Mark Arm on release as a chance to get new songs out for fans in between albums -- which might not sound important, but for a band on an album-centric major label still counts for something -- Five Dollar Bob's Mock Cooter Stew is part compilation, part collection of new goodies. One cut is a spectacular re-recording from the previous year's Piece of Cake, "Make It Now," here titled "Make It Now Again" and taking no prisoners from its heavy-duty psychedelic start, while two further efforts, "Deception Pass" and "Underide," had previously appeared on Piece of Cake-related singles. Of the four new songs, meanwhile, they're a rough but engaging little blend. "In the Blood" is one of the more restrained and almost personal cuts Mudhoney ever recorded, with a mid-range pace and a slightly queasy organ part setting a downbeat mood that Arm resignedly sings over. "No Song III" keeps things from being too down, though; this time around the analog synth creates an almighty buzz that Suicide could have been proud of while the foursome rips along at a fast clip, Dan Peters showing some sharp drumming flair as he goes. "Between You and Me Kid" explores a newer touch for the group, with a honky tonk country touch that hints at the following year's collaboration with Jimmie Dale Gilmore. "Six Two One," in contrast, sticks to Mudhoney-qua-Mudhoney, garage rock straight up that looks in the face of grunge's success and laughs. Speaking of humor, the credits get in a gentle jab at Nirvana (a few months before that became impossible), with the producer/Young Fresh Fellows member credited as Curt and Kurdt Bloch (real spelling: Kurt). ~ Ned Raggett
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Rock - Released September 19, 2018 | Sub Pop Records

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Alternative & Indie - Released September 19, 2018 | Sub Pop Records

Growing up gracefully would seem to be a contradiction for a band as cheerfully vulgar as Mudhoney, but there's no mistaking that the members of the quintessential Seattle quartet are comfortable within their own skins. They know what they are, they know they're not gonna change their stripes, not even as they glare at middle age right in the face. If anything, they revel in being crotchety old gits on 2013's Vanishing Point, pledging allegiance to garage punk, dropping references to long-gone pop culture phenomena, happy to wallow in their misanthropy. And, unlike on the preceding The Lucky Ones -- released way back in 2008; the five-year wait is the longest between Mudhoney records, signaling the band's slow descent into middle age -- Mark Arm's savage wit is on full display, as he scrapes himself against all manner of modern irritations. Arm rails against "Chardonnay" popping up on a backstage rider and people acting like long-lost friends, gets revolted by the "Douchebags on Parade," facetiously sings a song of joy and feigns positivity on "What to Do with the Neutral." As he sneers out his disgust, Mudhoney stomp out blitzkrieg rockers and Stooges dirges, working within their wheelhouse but gamely stretching out, encompassing hints of blues and elastic slide guitars. It is, in other words, a Mudhoney album through and through: no outright surprises sonically, but beneath the roar it's hard not to admire how their perennial piss-takes are subtly deepening and how their saturated superfuzz always sounds so good. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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LiE

Alternative & Indie - Released September 19, 2018 | Sub Pop Records

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Punk to the core rather than pioneers of confirmed grunge, the overgrown brats of Seattle have returned with yet another live album, as raw as it is punchy. It is a celebration of thirty uncompromising years. LiE, short for Live in Europe, is certainly concise. Eleven tracks, 38 minutes. Stinking of sweat, corruption and urgency, they once again prove the power of a group that refuses to compromise on their dropout credentials. Across Croatia, Germany, Sweden, Austria, Norway and Slovenia, Mark Arm's gang records the essentials, before closing with the rarer Editions Of You by Roxy Music (which they first set down in 1999) and the seven excellent minutes of Broken Hands. While this live album is triumphant, it doesn't add anything new: a new Mudhoney studio album would set off 2018 perfectly. © CS/Qobuz
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Alternative & Indie - Released September 19, 2018 | Sub Pop Records

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Mudhoney in the magazine
  • Still spitting
    Still spitting “Fuck the planet. Screw your children. Get Rich! You win!” (Prosperity Gospel).