Similar artists

Albums

$12.99

Alternative & Indie - Released December 7, 2018 | BMG Rights Management (UK) Limited

In the middle of summer 2014 Morrissey reassured us all with World Peace Is None Of Your Business that his inspiration had been refreshed like never before. Three years later, with Low In High School, the former singer of The Smiths has changed his tune with an 11th solo album that’s rather puzzling. Puzzling even by his standards. But the eclecticism of the production, going from a total powerhouse of sounds to almost acoustic refrains, mustn’t mask the power of several of the songs. As usual, Moz is impeccable in his role as a misanthropic pamphleteer and, judging by the cover, we understand that the British dandy is not here to swallow his pride. A pride that he always likes to counteract with a good dose of ambiguity, this art in which he remains a real expert. But when he’s doing Morrissey, like on Home Is a Question Mark or I Bury The Living, once he puts on his quirky crooner habits on a sharpened prose, he is unique… Album after album, Morrissey reminds us that The Smiths saga is buried firmly underground and that he’s dancing on the headstone. © MD/Qobuz
$14.99
$12.99

Alternative & Indie - Released November 17, 2017 | BMG Rights Management (UK) Ltd

Hi-Res
In the middle of summer 2014 Morrissey reassured us all with World Peace Is None Of Your Business that his inspiration had been refreshed like never before. Three years later, with Low In High School, the former singer of The Smiths has changed his tune with an 11th solo album that’s rather puzzling. Puzzling even by his standards. But the eclecticism of the production, going from a total powerhouse of sounds to almost acoustic refrains, mustn’t mask the power of several of the songs. As usual, Moz is impeccable in his role as a misanthropic pamphleteer and, judging by the cover, we understand that the British dandy is not here to swallow his pride. A pride that he always likes to counteract with a good dose of ambiguity, this art in which he remains a real expert. But when he’s doing Morrissey, like on Home Is a Question Mark or I Bury The Living, once he puts on his quirky crooner habits on a sharpened prose, he is unique… Album after album, Morrissey reminds us that The Smiths saga is buried firmly underground and that he’s dancing on the headstone. © MD/Qobuz

Alternative & Indie - Released November 2, 2018 | BMG Rights Management (UK) Limited

Download not available
$12.99

Rock - Released January 1, 2009 | UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)

The latest in a long line of stray track compilations that stretches all the way back to Bona Drag, if not Hatful of Hallow, 2009's Swords gathers up 18 highlights from the B-sides of singles from You Are the Quarry, Ringleader of the Tormentors, and Years of Refusal -- the three albums that constitute the great Moz comeback of the new millennium. Not all the flipsides are here, but all the noteworthy ones are, including a cameo from Chrissie Hynde on "Shame Is the Name," a cover of David Bowie's "Drive-In Saturday" with new lyrics all about the New York Dolls. These little pieces of flair dress up a pretty drab selection of songs that sound like leftovers, cut from the original albums not because they didn't fit the mood, but because they didn't quite work -- covering similar territory as the proper album, only just not as well. Nothing here is quite an embarrassment, but compared to his other albums of this nature, including the muddled World of Morrissey, there's a distinct lack of humor and hooks, or anything else memorable. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
$12.99

Alternative & Indie - Released November 17, 2017 | BMG Rights Management (UK) Limited

In the middle of summer 2014 Morrissey reassured us all with World Peace Is None Of Your Business that his inspiration had been refreshed like never before. Three years later, with Low In High School, the former singer of The Smiths has changed his tune with an 11th solo album that’s rather puzzling. Puzzling even by his standards. But the eclecticism of the production, going from a total powerhouse of sounds to almost acoustic refrains, mustn’t mask the power of several of the songs. As usual, Moz is impeccable in his role as a misanthropic pamphleteer and, judging by the cover, we understand that the British dandy is not here to swallow his pride. A pride that he always likes to counteract with a good dose of ambiguity, this art in which he remains a real expert. But when he’s doing Morrissey, like on Home Is a Question Mark or I Bury The Living, once he puts on his quirky crooner habits on a sharpened prose, he is unique… Album after album, Morrissey reminds us that The Smiths saga is buried firmly underground and that he’s dancing on the headstone. © MD/Qobuz
$11.49

Rock - Released January 1, 2009 | UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)

$18.99

Rock - Released January 1, 2009 | UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)

$3.99

Rock - Released January 24, 2014 | Rhino

$1.99

Rock - Released July 7, 2009 | Rhino - Warner Bros.

Playing it a touch safe for his debut solo release, Morrissey whipped up an extremely Smiths-sounding lead track. Stephen Street wrote the music and Vini Reilly may have played the guitar as well as chiming keyboards, but one has the feeling they did so on his specific request. Regardless, it is a memorable number, with Street's subtle orchestrations carrying the sweep of the song. The B-sides all have their points; "Hairdresser on Fire" has a melodramatic string beginning before kicking into a nice acoustic/electric groove accompanied by bells on the chorus. The other two cuts, "I Know Very Well How I Got My Name" and "Oh Well, I'll Never Learn" are short tracks, but the former has a great Reilly performance and lovely Street strings, letting Morrissey take a spotlight vocal turn. The latter track has just about all the same elements but doesn't succeed as well in comparison. ~ Ned Raggett
$14.49

Rock - Released October 15, 1990 | Rhino - Warner Bros.

As he was toiling on Kill Uncle, Morrissey released Bona Drag, a compilation of singles and B-sides, including "Everyday Is Like Sunday" and "Suedehead" from Viva Hate. While the record conveniently overlooks some rarities, the selections on Bona Drag are uniformly first-rate and many of the songs -- "Picadilly Palare," "Interesting Drug," "November Spawned a Monster," "The Last of the Famous International Playboys," "Lucky Lisp," "Disappointed," "He Knows I'd Love to See Him," and "Ouija Board, Ouija Board" -- are Morrissey classics, arguably making Bona Drag a more consistent and entertaining record than Viva Hate. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
$16.49

Rock - Released November 6, 2001 | Rhino - Warner Bros.

As any Mozzer fan knows, his catalog is cluttered with compilations -- some good, some middling, many unnecessary. So, why the need for Rhino's 2001 collection The Best of Morrissey? Well, according to the press release, it's because there is no Morrissey hits collection available in the U.S., which is technically true, but compilations like Bona Drag, World of Morrissey, and My Early Burglary Years have certainly been on the American market (the catch is they're not hits compilations; actually, I have no idea what they are, since they're always album tracks, singles, and B-sides, playing like your resident Morrissey fanatic's favorite mix tape). This, however, is a genuine hits collection, attempting to gather the best of the EMI/Parlophone years and his tour of U.K. major labels (most of which were released on Sire/Warner in the U.S.). There are singles missing here, but they're by and large minor hits and personal favorites (Southpaw Grammar gets slighted, with no "Dagenham Dave" or "Boyracer"), and nearly every iconic Morrissey song is here. They might not be in chronological order, but they're present and accounted for, and it flows nicely, proving that Morrissey could always deliver gems, from "Suedehead" and "Everyday Is Like Sunday," through "Tomorrow," "I Know It's Gonna Happen Someday," and "The More You Ignore Me the Closer I Get," to the brilliant, underappreciated "Alma Matters." So, this very well may be the Morrissey album for those who don't need every Morrissey album -- but since this is a Morrissey compilation, it does have one piece of bait for collectors, the final Island single, "Lost," from 1998, which I can't even remember coming out and I collect these things. And you know what -- I really wouldn't want Morrissey any other way (which is why us Morrissey fans are considered a sado-masochistic lot, I guess). ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
$15.49

Rock - Released September 13, 2009 | Rhino - Warner Bros.

If Vauxhall and I represented a more mature Morrissey, Southpaw Grammar superficially presents a more rough and tumble version of the singer. As his previous single, "Boxers," indicated, Morrissey's fascination with boxing and violence has reached full fruition. The music appropriately reflects this, with growling, distorted guitars and martial rhythms. But Southpaw Grammar doesn't rock as hard or with as much style as the rockabilly-inflected Your Arsenal -- instead, it's his art rock album, complete with strings, drum solos, and two ten-minute songs. Of these, the winding, menacing "The Teachers Are Afraid of the Pupils" works the best, and it represents a significant change in Morrissey's outlook; instead of the children being outsiders, "the teachers" are. Throughout Southpaw Grammar, the privileged are oppressed by their fortunes, while working-class toughs are celebrated for their violence. However, there is no cohesive glue to the record. "The Teachers" uses its 11 minutes effectively, but "Southpaw" is merely ponderous. "Reader Meet Author" and "Dangenham Dave" are classic three-minute pop songs, but "Do Your Best and Don't Worry" is strictly by the books. Nevertheless, there is plenty of enjoyable music on the record, even if the concept is flawed. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine

Alternative & Indie - Released March 23, 2018 | BMG Rights Management (UK) Limited

Download not available
$12.99

Rock - Released March 15, 1988 | Rhino - Warner Bros.

$15.49

Rock - Released September 13, 2009 | Rhino - Warner Bros.

Possibly left without a record contract, working without a manager, living in self-imposed exile, Morrissey returned to what he knew best in the fall of 1998 -- recycling his own material. My Early Burglary Years was released under the pretense of offering American-audiences songs, such as "Sunny," previously unavailable on U.S. shores -- which is kind of ridiculous, since anyone still buying Morrissey records in 1998 likely buys every single, regardless of their country of origin. That leaves My Early Burglary Years as another odd collection of rarities, singles, and album tracks. There are undoubtedly some fans who haven't bought every single, but this disc won't necessarily help them, since the rarities are mixed in with familiar material. That said, My Early Burglary Years is a better bit for lapsed collectors looking to pick up some rare songs than World of Morrissey, since it has such non-LP items as the entire "Sunny" single and "Cosmic Dancer" (which is a previously released version, contrary to the cover sticker's claims) that have never appeared on a comp or as bonus tracks. It's not quite enough to excuse the repeat appearances of the seemingly ubiquitous "Sister I'm a Poet" and "Jack the Ripper" (as well as album tracks from Southpaw Grammar), or the lack of a comprehensive B-sides and rarities collection, but at least it's a step in the right direction. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
$7.49

Rock - Released January 1, 1997 | Island Def Jam

In theory, Maladjusted should have been a readjustment to standard indie rock territory for Morrissey after the prog rock detour of Southpaw Grammar, but Morrissey isn't that simple. From the opening title track, with its menacing, swirling paranoia, it's clear that Maladjusted isn't a simple return to form. That isn't to say that the album is devoid of the jangly, maudlin pop songs that are Morrissey's trademark -- in fact, the lead single, "Alma Matters," is a quietly catchy tune that ranks as vintage Morrissey. Nevertheless, it's a little misleading, because Maladjusted isn't strictly by the book. Morrissey has incorporated his newfound fascination with prog rock into his trademark sound much better than he did on Southpaw Grammar, as the lumbering beat of "Papa Jack" and sawing strings of "Ambitious Outsiders" illustrate, but that fascination signals how insular Morrissey's world has become. Things are rarely more insular -- or weirder -- than "Sorrow Will Come in the End," a spoken word, neo-classical rant about his loss to Mike Joyce in a Smiths royalty suit (the song was pulled from the British version of the album, due to legal reasons), but "Roy's Keen," an ode to a keen window cleaner, isn't far behind. The remainder of the album -- particularly the lovely "Wide to Receive," "He Cried," and "Trouble Loves Me" -- may be similarly self-obsessed, yet the music is warm and welcoming, thanks to strong craftsmanship and fine performances. They're charming songs, but they're subtle charms, offering the kind of pleasures only longtime Morrissey followers will find irresistible. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
$18.99

Rock - Released June 3, 2014 | Rhino - Warner Bros.

While it isn't a gutsy rock & roll record like Your Arsenal, Vauxhall and I is equally impressive. Filled with carefully constructed guitar pop gems, the album contains some of Morrissey's best material since the Smiths. Out of all of his solo albums, Vauxhall and I sounds the most like his former band, yet the textured, ringing guitar on this record is an extension of his past, not a replication of it. In fact, with songs like "Now My Heart Is Full" and "Hold on to Your Friends," Morrissey sounds more comfortable and peaceful than he ever has. And "The More You Ignore Me, the Closer I Get," "Speedway," and "Spring-Heeled Jim" prove that he hasn't lost his vicious wit. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
$12.99

Pop - Released January 1, 2009 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

$1.49

Pop - Released January 1, 2009 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

$12.99

Pop - Released August 31, 2018 | Rhino - Warner Bros.

An odds-and-sods collection in every meaning of the term, the 2018 set This Is Morrissey is a hodgepodge of hits ("The Last of the Famous International Playboys," "Ouija Board, Ouija Board," "Everyday Is Like Sunday"), deep cuts, B-sides, alternate mixes, and live cuts. While this certainly contains good music -- not just the aforementioned hits but nifty rarities like a live version of Lou Reed's "Satellite of Love" -- it's hard to imagine who this compilation is for, as it's not a good intro to Morrissey for novices and serious Moz-heads will already own this stuff. Still, as a listen, it's pleasant. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine