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Classical - Released May 27, 2016 | Glossa

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 4 étoiles Classica
The English Baroque composer John Jones is virtually forgotten today, though harpsichordist Mitzi Meyerson has recorded his singular Eight Setts of Lessons for the Harpsichord, a 1754 collection that is full of surprises. Jones' obscurity is easily explained because he was a contemporary of George Frederick Handel, and like others at the time, he had to work in the great man's shadow. Yet in spite of the odds against him, Jones' career as an organist and composer brought him wealth and a good reputation as a composer. His harpsichord pieces were sold by subscription, mostly to aristocrats and others who could afford them, and they attracted the notice of Charles Avison, William Boyce, and Charles Burney, among other 18th century luminaries. The Eight Setts -- actually eight suites of short pieces of wide-ranging character -- are extraordinary for their technical demands, inventiveness, and brilliance, and at their finest, are reminiscent of pieces by Domenico Scarlatti, Jean-Philippe Rameau, and even Handel, whose influence Jones couldn't have escaped. Meyerson's virtuosity and exquisite feeling for this music make this double CD an extraordinary find, and she puts Jones back in the spotlight after two centuries of neglect, a major achievement in itself. Glossa's recording is clear and crisply detailed, even though the performances were recorded in a German church, and the package is a treat for lovers of Baroque harpsichord music. Highly recommended. © TiVo
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Classical - Released May 7, 2021 | Glossa

Hi-Res Booklet
Mitzi Meyerson is a world-renowned American harpsichordist and teacher, based in Berlin for many decades now. She maintains a sterling reputation for her concerts and recordings, and has taught hundreds of students over the last thirty years, many of whom went on to be successful artists in their own right. She specializes in researching little-known or lost works for the harpsichord which she then brings to light in recordings. She has released over sixty albums to excellent critical acclaim. For the last fifteen years she has been an exclusive Glossa recording artist, in a label that has worked with her in order to bring into the light, a solo or with small chamber ensembles, music by Balbastre, Muffat, Jones (Richard and John), Somis or Francœur. © Glossa
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Classical - Released January 1, 1993 | Warner Classics

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Chamber Music - Released January 1, 2009 | Glossa

Gottlieb Muffat was a son of Georg Muffat, whose organ and orchestral works played an important role in introducing international styles into the German tradition. The younger Muffat's works have just begun to emerge from archives; the present collection of suites was discovered in a manuscript by the American-German harpsichordist Mitzi Meyerson, who makes a superb case for them here. The booklet notes are in the form of an interview with the performer, which is commended to all who want to sharpen their ears for the abundant genre of the Baroque keyboard suite. Meyerson's enthusiasm is contagious, both verbally and at the keyboard. Her main point is that Muffat, who went east from his father's Salzburg home base and became court organist in Vienna in the middle of the eighteenth century, was, like his father, a sort of sampler-of-all-styles who tried to take listeners on a kind of musical adventure. The two discs here contain six suites for keyboard, plus a seventh work designated as a suite but simply containing a chaconne. In their outward sequences of allemandes, courantes, sarabandes, and so on, they look conventional, but when you get inside the individual movements you find unexpected contrasts and surprise effects heightened by Meyerson's unusual registrations on the harpsichord (listen to the very end of the trio of the Menuet of the fifth suite, track 7, and try to figure out how she does what she does because she isn't telling). All the opening movements are interesting; several contain fugues (which don't appear much elsewhere in the French-style repertory), and the opening Fantasie of Suite III repeatedly feints toward a chaconne bass before erupting into figuration and beginning to move more rapidly. The music is brilliant, imaginative, and a bit evocative of a hothouse court atmosphere, as if Rameau had somehow been transplanted, perhaps, from theoretical Paris to then-staid Vienna. It's a major find, and the two-manual harpsichord by iconoclastic Michigan builder Keith Hill is unusually well suited to this music. Throw in the nifty list of Muffat themes borrowed by no less than Handel, along with very pleasing graphic design from the Glossa label (check out the interior rendering of Meyerson in lips and colored leaves), and you have all the ingredients of a real Baroque find. Notes are in English, French, German, and Spanish. © TiVo
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Classical - Released January 1, 2003 | Glossa

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Classical - Released January 1, 2006 | Glossa

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Classical - Released January 1, 2004 | Glossa

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Classical - Released June 1, 2000 | Musikproduktion Dabringhaus und Grimm (MDG)

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Classical - Released September 1, 2001 | Musikproduktion Dabringhaus und Grimm (MDG)