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Crooners - Released April 15, 2013 | Reprise

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Ambient/New Age - Released October 14, 2011 | 143 - Reprise

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Christmas is vocalist Michael Bublé's first full-length holiday-themed album since his 2003 EP Let It Snow. As with that album, Christmas features Bublé backed by small ensembles as well as his big band and orchestra, and includes a handful of classic Christmas songs. In that sense, the album is a rather old-school affair, with Bublé in prime Bing Crosby-meets-Dean Martin vocal style tackling such chestnuts as "It's Beginning to Look a Lot Like Christmas," "Silent Night," and "I'll Be Home for Christmas." There are also some fine, contemporary, if still retro-sounding, pop moments here including Bublé's duet with the British female pop trio the Puppini Sisters on "Jingle Bells," and his inspired, slightly melancholy reworking of Mariah Carey's "All I Want for Christmas Is You." Ultimately, Christmas is a warm and inviting album that showcases Bublé's impeccable vocal chops. © Matt Collar /TiVo
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Pop - Released November 16, 2018 | Reprise

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Ambient/New Age - Released October 14, 2011 | Reprise

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Christmas is vocalist Michael Bublé's first full-length holiday-themed album since his 2003 EP Let It Snow. As with that album, Christmas features Bublé backed by small ensembles as well as his big band and orchestra, and includes a handful of classic Christmas songs. In that sense, the album is a rather old-school affair, with Bublé in prime Bing Crosby-meets-Dean Martin vocal style tackling such chestnuts as "It's Beginning to Look a Lot Like Christmas," "Silent Night," and "I'll Be Home for Christmas." There are also some fine, contemporary, if still retro-sounding, pop moments here including Bublé's duet with the British female pop trio the Puppini Sisters on "Jingle Bells," and his inspired, slightly melancholy reworking of Mariah Carey's "All I Want for Christmas Is You." Ultimately, Christmas is a warm and inviting album that showcases Bublé's impeccable vocal chops. © Matt Collar /TiVo
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Film Soundtracks - Released March 21, 2019 | Reprise

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Pop - Released April 30, 2007 | 143 - Reprise

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Pop - Released February 11, 2003 | 143 - Reprise

Unlike most young guys who gravitate towards the latest rock or rap trend, Michael Bublé chose to study the classic works of pop vocal masters like Ella Fitzgerald and Frank Sinatra while slowly developing his own technique and career as a vocal interpreter. Thanks to producer David Foster, the 25-year-old Bublé has graduated to the big time with a self-titled debut disc that shows off his knowledge and appreciation for a style of music that is mostly unfamiliar to his generation. Swinging his way through a set of pop standards both classic ("The Way You Look Tonight"), and more recent ("Moondance"), Bublé already possesses a quality that reaches beyond his youthfulness, with a voice that incorporates his influences into a sound that is fresh yet familiar. When he launches into a standard like "Come Fly With Me," images of Sinatra are conjured up; but as the song progresses, the listener realizes that this is not Sinatra, or Bobby Darin, or any other famous vocalist. It is someone who has learned the art of popular song and is creating his own colorful music from shades of the past. In doing so, Bublé throws a fresh coat of paint on an old standard like "Fever," and gives it a satiny sheen that the song hasn't seen in years. In addition to revitalizing the classics, he draws in a younger audience by covering more recent, rock-era songs in a swinging gloss. Songs like George Michael's "Kissing a Fool" or Queen's "Crazy Little Thing Called Love" are jazzed up even further than their retro-based originals, and flow easily alongside the standards. The only interruption comes when Barry Gibb guests on his own "How Can You Mend a Broken Heart," with a reverb-laced vibrato that simply does not fit in this musical environment. Throughout the disc it is apparent that Bublé has done his homework and aced the test, but there is always room for improvement. Sinatra haunts his vocals a bit too much on songs like "Summer Wind," and there are moments throughout the disc when he forces his technique instead of following a natural cadence, but these minor criticisms will improve with time; and nothing can really diminish the sheer pleasure and joy he expresses in each performance. He sounds absolutely thrilled to be singing these songs, and that goes a long way in making Michael Bublé an exciting debut. © Aaron Latham /TiVo
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Pop - Released October 21, 2016 | Reprise

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Pop - Released June 12, 2009 | 143 - Reprise

Michael Bublé Meets Madison Square Garden finds Canadian crooner Bublé making a highly anticipated appearance at the storied New York City concert venue. Often seen as a symbolic moment for a performer having achieved a high level of populist success, Madison Square Garden performances have led to a few well-known live albums, including one from Bublé's own most notable influence, Frank Sinatra. Interestingly, while Sinatra's 1974 album The Main Event came toward the latter half of his career, Bublé's appeared right as some critics and even his contemporaries like smooth jazz trumpeter Chris Botti were proclaiming his ascension to Sinatra's throne as the best traditional pop vocalist of his generation. Setting such grandiose summations aside, Bublé is at the very least an incredibly talented vocalist who grew from a nice kid singer in the early part of the decade to a truly swinging interpreter of the Great American Songbook canon by the end of the decade. Furthermore, Bublé found the right modern pop/soul songs -- often co-written by himself ("Lost," "Home") -- which has worked to fully contemporize his likable and swaggering stage persona, all of which is readily apparent on Meets Madison Square Garden. Backed here by his de rigueur big band, Bublé has a joyful and abundantly devilish rapport with the audience and is clearly as in love with them as they are with him. Not surprisingly, there was some buzz surrounding Bublé's Madison Square Garden concert, which marked not only his first appearance at the Garden, but also his return visit to the famous Blue Note jazz club where he made his original N.Y.C. debut. Included with the CD of Michael Bublé Meets Madison Square Garden is a DVD documentary detailing this return visit as well as the behind-the-scenes buildup and performance of his Madison Square Garden concert. © Matt Collar /TiVo
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Pop - Released November 16, 2018 | Reprise

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Pop - Released October 6, 2009 | 143 - Reprise

Buoyed by the popularity of the hit contemporary pop ballad "Home," singer Michael Bublé's 2005 album, It's Time, clearly positioned the vocalist as the preeminent neo-crooner of his generation. Bublé's 2007 follow-up, Call Me Irresponsible, only further reinforced this notion. Not only had he come into his own as a lithe, swaggering stage performer with a knack for jazzing a crowd, but he had also grown into a virtuoso singer. Sure, he'd never drop nor deny the Sinatra comparisons, but now Bublé's voice -- breezy, tender, and controlled -- was his own. It didn't hurt, either, that he and his producers found the perfect balance of old-school popular song standards and more modern pop covers and originals that at once grounded his talent in tradition and pushed him toward the pop horizon. All of this is brought to bear on Bublé's 2009 effort, Crazy Love. Easily the singer's most stylistically wide-ranging album, it is also one of his brightest, poppiest, and most fun. Bublé kicks things off with the theatrical, epic ballad "Cry Me a River" and proceeds to milk the tune with burnished breath, eking out the drama line by line. It's over the top for sure, but Bublé takes you to the edge of the cliff, prepares to jump, and then gives you a knowing wink that says, not quite yet -- there's more fun to be had. And what fun it is with Bublé swinging through "All of Me," and killin' Van Morrison's classic "Crazy Love" with a light and yearning touch. And just as "Home" worked to showcase Bublé's own writing abilities, here we get the sunshine pop of "Haven't Met You Yet" -- a skippy, jaunty little song that brings to mind a mix of the Carpenters and Chicago. Throw in a rollicking and soulful duet with Sharon Jones & the Dap Kings on "Baby (You've Got What It Takes)," and a fabulously old-school close-harmony version of "Stardust" with Bublé backed by the vocal ensemble Naturally 7, and Crazy Love really starts to come together. All of this would be enough to fall in love with the album, but then Bublé goes and throws in a last minute overture by duetting with fellow Canadian singer/songwriter Ron Sexsmith on Sexsmith's ballad "Whatever It Takes." A devastating, afterglow-ready paean for romance, the song is a modern-day classic that pairs one of the most underrated and ignored songwriters of his generation next to one of the most ballyhooed in Bublé -- a classy move for sure. The result, like the rest of Crazy Love, is pure magic. © Matt Collar /TiVo
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Pop - Released December 2, 2011 | 143 - Reprise

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Ambient/New Age - Released October 14, 2011 | 143 - Reprise

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Pop - Released November 15, 2005 | Reprise

Featured as a PBS "Great Performances," Caught in the Act finds modern-day crooner Michael Bublé performing live at the Wiltern Theatre in Los Angeles. Bublé has a warm, naturally pure voice perfectly suited to the swinging standards and heartfelt contemporary ballads he's made his name with since his debut in 2003. It doesn't hurt either that here he is backed by a full big band including a string section. Bublé's between-song banter is also charming and adds to the loose and fun feel of the album. Included are such classic songs as "Summer Wind" and "The More I See You," as well as the hit "Home." Also featured here is a full DVD of the rest of the live show as well as some other bonus material. © Matt Collar /TiVo
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Pop - Released February 8, 2005 | 143 - Reprise

Although it took more than a year of concerts and promotional appearances, Michael Bublé's 2003 debut disc of swinging pop standards finally ascended the Billboard album chart and landed at number 47. That peak may not seem impressive at first, but in a musical world dominated by rap or the latest flavor of alternative rock, Bublé's upper chart appearance was a real accomplishment and it sparked a renewed interest in music associated with great vocalists like Frank Sinatra. With his second studio disc, It's Time, Bublé builds upon the musical foundation he laid with his debut and demonstrates that he is much more than a flavor-of-the-month celebrity. Like his debut, It's Time mines the rich history of pop music as Bublé applies his own technique to classic standards and incorporates his Rat Pack sound into modern pop songs. Other pop vocal giants have made attempts to reinterpret the pop songs of their day with appalling results (Mel Tormé's version of "Sunshine Superman" comes to mind), but Bublé has the knack for selecting the right songs that he can properly transform into edible works that avoid a cheesy aftertaste. Having a standard like "A Foggy Day (In London Town)" share space with the Beatles' "Can't Buy Me Love" may seem like a lounge lizard joke waiting to happen, but the arrangements (most courtesy of producer David Foster) and performances are seamless. Therefore, the quiet groove of "I've Got You Under My Skin" can sit comfortable next to Bublé's smoky version of Leon Russell's "Song for You," featuring Chris Botti on trumpet. Perhaps it is due to this formula working so well that Bublé has incorporated more of his unique takes on modern pop than on his debut. He even ventures into R&B territory with older hits like "Try a Little Tenderness" and "How Sweet It Is," all the while giving these songs a retro freshness that breathes new life into these gems. Pop starlet Nelly Furtado sounds lovely and elegant in the duet "Quando, Quando, Quando," while Bublé ends the disc with a beautiful reading of Stevie Wonder's "You and I." Another positive step forward is the inclusion of the lovely original tune "Home," a somewhat autobiographical "too long on the road" song co-written by Bublé. The success of this ballad provides yet another direction that he can explore and expand upon. Throughout the disc Bublé emits the feeling that he loves these songs and truly enjoys what he is doing. He sounds pure of voice and pure of heart. Those are rare commodities in the recorded world and they, along with Bublé's talent and vision, help to make It's Time a wonderful listening experience. © Aaron Latham /TiVo
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Pop - Released March 30, 2004 | 143 - Reprise

For Michael Bublé, 2003 was a whirlwind year that included the release of his successful debut album, an international tour, a Christmas EP, and tons of promotional appearances and press interviews. Therefore, it is not surprising that, in lieu of a proper follow-up, Bublé has elected to keep his fan base happy with Come Fly with Me, a CD/DVD combo package that features live performances from several of his tour dates along with two new studio tracks. The DVD is the more interesting of the two discs, as it gives a glimpse into the fast-paced world of a rising star, combining musical numbers and candid footage shot during the tour. Bublé is seen vivaciously performing with his band while snippets of behind-the-scenes interviews act as interludes between the songs. The brief moments provide a little background history and make him out to be an average guy who was blessed with talent and enjoys what he is doing. Although it is nice to get a feel for the person, what is most important is the music, and he more than proves that he is both an excellent vocalist and entertainer. He sounds great, the band is hot, and Bublé appears to genuinely love performing for an audience. However, the editing of the musical footage is a major distraction. Although the audio track sounds as if it came from one uncut song performance, the visuals are made up of several filmed concerts and are spliced together in a rather jarring fashion. Every two to three seconds a different shot of Bublé singing a song is edited in (often in layers), but the specific shot onscreen may not be from the same performance as the recorded concert audio. Therefore, there are times when the visuals don't match the audio track (much like a foreign film dub). While this technique may be interesting and thematic for the opening title track, it quickly becomes annoying when done for over an hour. The CD includes live versions of six songs featured on the DVD along with two new studio tracks produced by David Foster. "Nice 'n Easy" is just like its title, as Bublé sings with a relaxed swagger that charms the listener, but "Can't Help Falling in Love" suffers from a schmaltzy Foster arrangement that Bublé tries his best to overcome. The song sounds even worse when followed by a brilliant live rendition of "My Funny Valentine." Although the DVD may be more enjoyable if played with the television off, Come Fly with Me has enough excellent musical moments to keep fans tuned in to Bublé's one-man revival of standards. © Aaron Latham /TiVo
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Pop - Released April 27, 2007 | 143 - Reprise

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Pop - Released February 7, 2005 | 143 - Reprise

Although it took more than a year of concerts and promotional appearances, Michael Bublé's 2003 debut disc of swinging pop standards finally ascended the Billboard album chart and landed at number 47. That peak may not seem impressive at first, but in a musical world dominated by rap or the latest flavor of alternative rock, Bublé's upper chart appearance was a real accomplishment and it sparked a renewed interest in music associated with great vocalists like Frank Sinatra. With his second studio disc, It's Time, Bublé builds upon the musical foundation he laid with his debut and demonstrates that he is much more than a flavor-of-the-month celebrity. Like his debut, It's Time mines the rich history of pop music as Bublé applies his own technique to classic standards and incorporates his Rat Pack sound into modern pop songs. Other pop vocal giants have made attempts to reinterpret the pop songs of their day with appalling results (Mel Tormé's version of "Sunshine Superman" comes to mind), but Bublé has the knack for selecting the right songs that he can properly transform into edible works that avoid a cheesy aftertaste. Having a standard like "A Foggy Day (In London Town)" share space with the Beatles' "Can't Buy Me Love" may seem like a lounge lizard joke waiting to happen, but the arrangements (most courtesy of producer David Foster) and performances are seamless. Therefore, the quiet groove of "I've Got You Under My Skin" can sit comfortable next to Bublé's smoky version of Leon Russell's "Song for You," featuring Chris Botti on trumpet. Perhaps it is due to this formula working so well that Bublé has incorporated more of his unique takes on modern pop than on his debut. He even ventures into R&B territory with older hits like "Try a Little Tenderness" and "How Sweet It Is," all the while giving these songs a retro freshness that breathes new life into these gems. Pop starlet Nelly Furtado sounds lovely and elegant in the duet "Quando, Quando, Quando," while Bublé ends the disc with a beautiful reading of Stevie Wonder's "You and I." Another positive step forward is the inclusion of the lovely original tune "Home," a somewhat autobiographical "too long on the road" song co-written by Bublé. The success of this ballad provides yet another direction that he can explore and expand upon. Throughout the disc Bublé emits the feeling that he loves these songs and truly enjoys what he is doing. He sounds pure of voice and pure of heart. Those are rare commodities in the recorded world and they, along with Bublé's talent and vision, help to make It's Time a wonderful listening experience. © Aaron Latham /TiVo
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Vocal Music (Secular and Sacred) - Released September 9, 2003 | DRG Records

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Pop - Released February 5, 2010 | 143 - Reprise

Michael Bublé's six-song Special Delivery features a handful of ballads and two uptempo numbers that make the most of his supple crooner vocals and winning charm. Included here are such standards as "These Foolish Things (Remind Me of You)," "Dream a Little Dream of Me," and "Mack the Knife." Longtime listeners of Bublé's will be pleased with the big-band and symphonic ensemble arrangements that have become the singer's stock in trade. Although this is a short release, likely intended as a pleasant side-car to Bublé's 2009 full-length Crazy Love, Special Delivery is nonetheless a must hear for fans. © Matt Collar /TiVo