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Electronic - Released September 3, 2012 | Late Night Tales

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Electronic - Released September 3, 2012 | Late Night Tales

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Electronic - Released April 30, 2021 | Because Music Ltd.

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Electronic - Released March 5, 2012 | Because Music Ltd.

Previously a nu-rave trio in the mould of Klaxons, Metronomy, the brainchild of Joseph Mount, have changed tack for their third studio album, The English Riviera, following the departure of original member Gabriel Stebbing three years earlier. Having permanently recruited the talents of bassist Gbenga Adelekan and former Lightspeed Champion drummer Anna Prior, the follow-up to 2008's Nights Out, abandons their indie-disco sensibilities in favor of a more laid-back but equally idiosyncratic, sun-kissed sound which positions them as avant-garde purveyors in the vein of Saint Etienne rather than debauched glowstick wavers. But while its opening number, a 37-second snatch of cowing seagulls and distant waves lapping against the shore, may evoke the glamorous beaches of California, its remaining self-produced ten tracks are very much a love letter to both Mount's hometown of Totnes in Devon, and a romantic fantasy of the title's seaside resort he used to drive around in, blasting Ace of Base as a youth. While thankfully there aren't any attempts at European faux-reggae, there are nods to the rich and warm West Coast sounds of '70s Fleetwood Mac and the Eagles on the swaying, country-tinged "Trouble" and the ominous, fretless, bass-led "She Wants." But ultimately, as the title implies, the band's third album is unmistakably an English affair, and none more so than "Some Written," which kicks off with a shuffling end-of-the-pier waltz rhythm and the kind of old-fashioned Wurlitzer last heard in wartime ballrooms, before ending in a cavalcade of stylophones, cymbals, and even kazoos that sounds like a particularly clumsy one-man-band falling down the stairs. It's utterly bonkers, but fits right in when placed among the likes of "The Look," which borrows the hook from Perez Prado's "Guaglione" and fuses it with summery Beach Boys harmonies and archaic video game style synths, the lolloping Serge Gainsbourg-esque jazz-rock, and psychedelic guitar solos of "We Broke Free" and "Everything Goes My Way," a gorgeous '60s-inspired slice of cooing lounge-funk featuring the deadpan vocals of Veronica Falls' Roxanne Clifford. The band occasionally revert back to their more familiar electronic roots, such as on the ambient, Orbital-esque "Loving Arm," and the woozy synth wizardry of closing number "Love Underlined," but as sonically interesting as they are, they feel like slightly jarring interruptions to the album's underlying vaudeville nature. Relentless in its pursuit to soundtrack the uniqueness of the British summer, The English Riviera is a challenging but ultimately rewarding effort which cements Mount's reputation as one of Britain's most intriguing pop mavericks. © Jon O'Brien /TiVo
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Electronic - Released February 8, 2019 | Because Music Ltd.

The years fly by. Ten already! Nights Out is a golden nugget of synth pop from 2008 packed full of brooding hits such as Heartbreaker (with its squeaky door sample), A Thing For Me and Radio Ladio. With three synthesizers, a guitar, a nonchalant bass and falsetto choirs, the formula fed into the electro pop wave of the time, placing the group alongside the likes of Hot Chip. While much of the work from this genre remained in rather exclusive circles, Nights Out provoked a groundswell that affected a huge audience, despite its eccentric sound.Mr Mount, who was already an experienced producer and mixer, was at the helm of this record. After releasing Pip Pain (Pay The £5000 You Owe) alone in 2016, he joined forces with Oscar Cash and Gabriel Stebbing for this second album, though Joseph still produced almost all of it himself. It’s a concept album about having a bad time on a night out, with songs that are sometimes gloomy (Night Out), sometimes playful (On Dancefloors), but always brilliant. Metronomy plays with delays, dissonances and ever-so-catchy melodies, which still sound just as good one decade on. And what better an opportunity to revisit this wonderful record than with this anniversary edition which includes unreleased tracks, B-sides and rare recordings. © Charlotte Saintoin/Qobuz
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Electronic - Released September 8, 2008 | Because Music Ltd.

Originally a solo vehicle for British singer/songwriter Joseph Mount, Metronomy's follow-up to Pip Paine (Pay the £5000 You Owe), is the first to feature full-time band members Oscar Cash and Gabriel Stebbing. Released in 2008, Nights Out, conceived as a concept album based on an evening on the town, blends melancholic synth pop, minimal techno-funk, and falsetto-laden vocals to create an eclectic sound which recalls the experimental electronica of Hot Chip. Produced by Mount, it includes the singles "Radio Ladio," "My Heart Rate Rapid," "Holiday," "Heartbreaker," and "A Thing for Me." © Jon O'Brien /TiVo
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Electronic - Released April 11, 2011 | Because Music Ltd.

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography - Sélection Les Inrocks - 4 étoiles Technikart - Sélection du Mercury Prize
Previously a nu-rave trio in the mould of Klaxons, Metronomy, the brainchild of Joseph Mount, have changed tack for their third studio album, The English Riviera, following the departure of original member Gabriel Stebbing three years earlier. Having permanently recruited the talents of bassist Gbenga Adelekan and former Lightspeed Champion drummer Anna Prior, the follow-up to 2008's Nights Out, abandons their indie-disco sensibilities in favor of a more laid-back but equally idiosyncratic, sun-kissed sound which positions them as avant-garde purveyors in the vein of Saint Etienne rather than debauched glowstick wavers. But while its opening number, a 37-second snatch of cowing seagulls and distant waves lapping against the shore, may evoke the glamorous beaches of California, its remaining self-produced ten tracks are very much a love letter to both Mount's hometown of Totnes in Devon, and a romantic fantasy of the title's seaside resort he used to drive around in, blasting Ace of Base as a youth. While thankfully there aren't any attempts at European faux-reggae, there are nods to the rich and warm West Coast sounds of '70s Fleetwood Mac and the Eagles on the swaying, country-tinged "Trouble" and the ominous, fretless, bass-led "She Wants." But ultimately, as the title implies, the band's third album is unmistakably an English affair, and none more so than "Some Written," which kicks off with a shuffling end-of-the-pier waltz rhythm and the kind of old-fashioned Wurlitzer last heard in wartime ballrooms, before ending in a cavalcade of stylophones, cymbals, and even kazoos that sounds like a particularly clumsy one-man-band falling down the stairs. It's utterly bonkers, but fits right in when placed among the likes of "The Look," which borrows the hook from Perez Prado's "Guaglione" and fuses it with summery Beach Boys harmonies and archaic video game style synths, the lolloping Serge Gainsbourg-esque jazz-rock, and psychedelic guitar solos of "We Broke Free" and "Everything Goes My Way," a gorgeous '60s-inspired slice of cooing lounge-funk featuring the deadpan vocals of Veronica Falls' Roxanne Clifford. The band occasionally revert back to their more familiar electronic roots, such as on the ambient, Orbital-esque "Loving Arm," and the woozy synth wizardry of closing number "Love Underlined," but as sonically interesting as they are, they feel like slightly jarring interruptions to the album's underlying vaudeville nature. Relentless in its pursuit to soundtrack the uniqueness of the British summer, The English Riviera is a challenging but ultimately rewarding effort which cements Mount's reputation as one of Britain's most intriguing pop mavericks. © Jon O'Brien /TiVo
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Electronic - Released March 10, 2014 | Because Music Ltd.

Hi-Res Distinctions Hi-Res Audio
Given the critical and commercial success of The English Riviera, Metronomy could have easily spent another album or two expanding on its polished, erudite pop. However, they're too mercurial a band to do the obvious thing. On Love Letters, they abandon their previous album's sleek precision for fuzzy analog charm. Metronomy recorded the album at London's Toe Rag studio, a fixture of British indie rock, and Joe Mount and company imbue these songs with the room's warmth and intimacy. Musically and emotionally, Love Letters is rawer than what came before it, trading breezy synth pop for insistent psych-rock and soul influences. The main carryover from The English Riviera is the increasing sophistication, and melancholy, in Mount's songwriting. Previously, his best songs were playful and ever so slightly emotional; on Love Letters, he flips this formula, penning songs filled with lost love, regrets, and just enough wit to sting. The album opens with three striking portraits of heartbreak: "The Upsetter" equals its distance with its urgency, capping it all with an achingly gorgeous guitar solo. "I'm Aquarius" traces the fallout of a star-crossed relationship impressionistically, with girl group-style "shoop doop"s almost overpowering Mount's reasons why it didn't work ("you're a novice/I'm a tourist"), as if memories of his ex crowd out everything else. "Monstrous" turns Metronomy's signature jaunty keyboards Baroque and paranoid, with a doomy organ that closes in when Mount sings "hold on tight to everything you love," and a counterpoint that captures the way loneliness and heartbreak circle each other. These songs set the stage perfectly for the desperate romance of "Love Letters" itself, which updates punchy, late-'60s Motown drama so well that it's easy to imagine the Four Tops singing it. Here and on "Month of Sundays"'s acid rock vistas, Metronomy's nods to the past feel more like footnotes than following too closely in anyone's footsteps. However, they sound more comfortable with their own quirks as well, giving more muscle to "Boy Racers" than their previous instrumentals, and more depth to "Reservoir," which is the closest it gets to a typical Metronomy song (if there is such a thing anymore). Confessional and insular, Love Letters is the work of a band willing to take pop success on their own terms and reveal a different -- but just as appealing -- side of their artistry in the process. © Heather Phares /TiVo
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Electronic - Released June 25, 2006 | Because Music Ltd.

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Electronic - Released September 14, 2009 | Because Music Ltd.

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Electronic - Released December 5, 2011 | Because Music Ltd.

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Electronic - Released June 20, 2011 | Because Music Ltd.

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Electronic - Released April 4, 2011 | Because Music Ltd.

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Electronic - Released December 12, 2008 | Because Music Ltd.

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Electronic - Released October 1, 2012 | Because Music Ltd.

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Electronic - Released April 6, 2009 | Because Music Ltd.

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Electronic - Released October 22, 2012 | Because Music Ltd.

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Electronic - Released October 22, 2012 | Because Music Ltd.

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Electronic - Released September 9, 2016 | Because Music Ltd.

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Electronic - Released December 8, 2008 | Because Music Ltd.

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