Your basket is empty

Categories :

Similar artists

Albums

From
HI-RES$20.99
CD$17.99

Jazz - Released January 1, 1960 | Verve Reissues

Hi-Res Distinctions Hi-Res Audio
Though the nominal concept for Mel Tormé's Swings Shubert Alley is Broadway standards, this last moment of pure Tormé brilliance moves much too fast and hard for the concept to be anything but pure swing. Of course it starts out with a bang with the punchy "Too Close for Comfort." Tormé sounds like he's racing the band to the finish of the song on this one (and a few others, like "Too Darn Hot" and "Surrey with the Fringe on Top"), on the latter he repeats the title over and over again with that exuberant voice. As with his other classic swing albums, Tormé does insert a few slower songs; here, "Once in Love with Amy," "A Sleepin' Bee" and "Old Devil Moon" are downtempo, with a smile. The overall mood, however, is unrestrained enthusiasm, and it makes for an excellent record. © John Bush /TiVo
From
HI-RES$14.99
CD$9.99

Jazz - Released January 28, 2014 | Bethlehem Records

Hi-Res Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
From
CD$12.99

Jazz - Released February 8, 2005 | Rhino Atlantic

Paced by his only hit of the rock era, Comin' Home Baby! is a real crossover record, balancing a few groovy dance numbers (like the title track) with early-'60s cool jazz versions of the standards "Walkin'," "Moanin'," and "On Green Dolphin Street." Though Mel Tormé never made a terrible record -- his crisp voice and ineffable delivery carried all of his dates -- this session has to count as a low point. The constant striving for some sort of jazz-hipster atmosphere relegates one of Tormé's positive attributes -- his excellent scatting -- into little more than a novelty act. Shorty Rogers, who arranged the record except for the two hit hopefuls (Claus Ogerman's "Comin' Home Baby!" and "Right Now"), attempts to equal Marty Paich's excellent arrangement on the mid-'50s records -- and doesn't quite succeed. "Moanin'" is a stale recasting of the superior Lambert, Hendricks, & Ross version, and the child noise on "Dat Dere" is just baffling. Compared to Tormé's other record for Atlantic, Sunday in New York, Comin' Home Baby! is a passé work that understandably can't get much of a reaction from the usually majestic Mel Tormé. © John Bush /TiVo
From
CD$12.99

Crooners - Released July 13, 1993 | Legacy - Columbia

16 Most Requested Songs is a midline-priced collection that spotlights Mel Tormé's work during his short stint with Columbia Records, including "P.S. I Love You," "The Second Time Around," "The Nearness of You," "My Romance," "I've Got You Under My Skin," "That's All," "Everyday's a Holiday," "Strangers in the Night," and "The Christmas Song." Although it's far from a perfect retrospective of his career, it's still a nice sampler of familiar items (including material from his elegant ballads collection That's All), and it may satisfy the needs of some casual fans who only want to hear a glimpse of what made Tormé's work special. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
From
CD$12.99

Ambient/New Age - Released January 1, 1992 | Telarc

Because Mel Tormé co-wrote "The Christmas Song," it was a surprise to many of his fans that when he recorded this full-length Christmas album for Telarc in 1992, it was his first. Since he is backed by a large orchestra (conducted by Keith Lockhart) in addition to his regular trio and the emphasis is on ballad renditions, Tormé does not get many opportunities to scat and swing on this pleasing but unadventurous set. However, the 16-track album, which includes several medleys and a pair of instrumentals for the orchestra, features tasteful and melodic Tormé interpretations of 20 Christmas-associated songs, and the album is worthwhile, if not essential. © Scott Yanow /TiVo
From
HI-RES$14.99
CD$9.99

Vocal Jazz - Released January 28, 2014 | Bethlehem Records

Hi-Res
From
CD$10.49

Jazz - Released January 1, 1998 | Verve

Swingin' on the Moon marks a bridge between Mel Tormé's excellent jazzy outings of the 1950s and the generally pop-oriented, novelty recordings of the '60s. Recorded over three days in August 1960, the album contains few standards, substituting instead lesser numbers which all contain the word "moon" in the title (including Tormé's own title song, which opens the set). Though he is in fine voice and the arrangements by Russ Garcia are solid, Tormé just can't come to grips with the lesser material, and the album is quite forgettable. It was released on Verve, which made it a jazz LP in theory, but Swingin' on the Moon can be consigned to the section of pop history which includes novelty "theme" albums arranged around a usually simple subject. This album should not be confused with the LaserLight collection titled Swinging on the Moon. © John Bush /TiVo
From
CD$12.99

Jazz - Released June 1, 2015 | Bethlehem Records

From
CD$10.49

Jazz - Released January 1, 1960 | Verve Reissues

Mel Tormé had artistic -- if not commercial -- success with his vocal group the Mel-Tones in the mid-'40s. After its breakup in 1946, when Tormé was persuaded to go solo, the Mel-Tones were occasionally regrouped by Tormé for special projects. These 1959 dates, which have been reissued in full on a Verve CD, were the group's final recordings, and they make for an interesting comparison with their earlier sessions. In addition to remakes of their two hits, "What Is This Thing Called Love" and "It Happened in Monterey," the arrangements (mostly by Marty Paich) have many quotes from jazz songs and are heavily influenced by Count Basie's Orchestra of the 1950s. The Mel-Tones, which at the time also included Sue Allen, Ginny O'Connor, Bernie Parke and Tom Kenny, swing throughout and sing attractive harmonies without really improvising. However, the concise solos of Art Pepper on both alto and tenor and trumpeter Jack Sheldon work well with the singers, making this a recommended set to fans of jazz vocal groups, of which the relatively short-lived Mel-Tones ranked near the top. © Scott Yanow /TiVo
From
CD$12.99

Vocal Jazz - Released January 1, 1982 | Concord Records

From
CD$12.99

Crooners - Released January 1, 1965 | Columbia - Legacy

Perhaps it was a reaction to his own obvious talents as a super-crooner, or an unwillingness to be pigeonholed, but Mel Torme only twice recorded an all-ballad album in his prime. The first was IT'S A BLUE WORLD, a 1956 beauty available with two other seminal Torme Bethlehem albums as part of a box set on Rhino-Bethlehem. It wasn't until 1964 that Torme and the pop producer/arranger Robert Mersey pulled out all the romantic stops again and recorded THAT'S ALL, heralded on the album cover itself as "a lush, romantic album." These two pros do not disappoint as 12 well-chosen gems like Gershwin's infrequently heard "Isn't it a Pity" and "The Nearness of You" are unveiled in a state-of-the-art pop production that includes bossa nova rhythms, soft guitar and a carpet of strings. The occasionally baroque Torme is in superb voice here, no scatting or fancy footwork in sight. As a bonus, the excellently remastered CD reissue also includes 12 little-known Torme performances, originally released as singles during his short stint with Columbia Records in the mid '60s. © TiVo
From
HI-RES$14.99
CD$9.99

Vocal Jazz - Released February 22, 1957 | Bethlehem Records

Hi-Res
More than two years after recording his first-ever concert LP, Live at the Crescendo for Coral, Mel Tormé returned to the Los Angeles nightclub for the Bethlehem release At the Crescendo, cut February 22, 1957. Backed by a small combo comprised of pianist/arranger Marty Paich, trumpeter Don Fagerquist, vibraphonist Larry Bunker, bassist Max Bennett, and drummer Mel Lewis, Tormé approaches familiar material like "One for My Baby," "It's Only a Paper Moon," and "I'm Beginning to See the Light" with a matchless combination of sensitivity and sass -- as always, Paich's nimble arrangements inspire Tormé's most adventurous vocals, and the sheer imagination and soulfulness on display throughout the set laid to rest any lingering question of whether he was a jazz artist or merely an easy listening balladeer. © Jason Ankeny /TiVo
From
CD$7.49

Jazz - Released January 1, 1958 | Verve

Most of Mel Tormé's albums for Verve and Bethlehem during the 1950s concentrated on material either carefree (usually up-tempo) or reflective (mostly down-tempo), but 1958's Tormé blended the two. For every bouncy single like "That Old Feeling" or "I'm Gonna Laugh You Out of My Life," Tormé sinks into the depths with "Gloomy Sunday," "The House Is Haunted (By the Echo of Your Last Goodbye)," or his dramatic eight-minute reading of "Blues in the Night." All this makes for a bit of emotional confusion while listening to Tormé, but the LP pulls together for the most part. © John Bush /TiVo
From
CD$10.49

Vocal Jazz - Released October 27, 1962 | Verve Reissues

From
CD$12.99

Jazz - Released January 1, 1988 | Concord Records

Singer Mel Tormé and pianist George Shearing make a perfect team, bringing out the best in each other. With the assistance of bassist John Leitham and drummer Donny Osborne, the swinging, witty duo performs a variety of standards, including Noël Coward's "Someday I'll Find You," "The Way You Look Tonight," and "Anyone Can Whistle," and a couple of medleys highlighted by a humorous six-song "New York, New York Medley." All of the Tormé/Shearing collaborations are quite enjoyable and highly recommended as some of their best work of the 1980s. © Scott Yanow /TiVo
From
CD$12.99

Jazz - Released January 1, 1993 | Telarc

Mel Tormé, 67 at the time of this recording, proves to still be very much in his musical prime. His range remains impressive, his creative abilities have grown through the years and his breath control is remarkable; as proof Tormé holds some very long notes at the conclusion of some of the ballads. This live set finds Tormé backed by what he dubbed "the Great American Songbook Orchestra," his usual trio plus a dozen horns. The band gets "Ya Gotta Try" as an instrumental and Tormé sits in on drums on "Rockin' in Rhythm" but otherwise the orchestra sticks to its anonymous role in the background. The singer wrote ten of the 15 arrangements and programmed plenty of variety in moods and tempos for his voice including a seven-song Duke Ellington mini-set. His masterful interpretation of "Stardust" is a highpoint. Recommended. © Scott Yanow /TiVo
From
HI-RES$12.99
CD$8.99

Jazz - Released August 28, 1978 | Gryphon Records

Hi-Res
From
CD$14.99

New Age - Released February 22, 2010 | Pacific

From
CD$10.49

Jazz - Released February 22, 1957 | Bethlehem Records

More than two years after recording his first-ever concert LP, Live at the Crescendo for Coral, Mel Tormé returned to the Los Angeles nightclub for the Bethlehem release At the Crescendo, cut February 22, 1957. Backed by a small combo comprised of pianist/arranger Marty Paich, trumpeter Don Fagerquist, vibraphonist Larry Bunker, bassist Max Bennett, and drummer Mel Lewis, Tormé approaches familiar material like "One for My Baby," "It's Only a Paper Moon," and "I'm Beginning to See the Light" with a matchless combination of sensitivity and sass -- as always, Paich's nimble arrangements inspire Tormé's most adventurous vocals, and the sheer imagination and soulfulness on display throughout the set laid to rest any lingering question of whether he was a jazz artist or merely an easy listening balladeer. © Jason Ankeny /TiVo
From
CD$12.99

Jazz - Released May 7, 2001 | Verve Reissues

Mel Tormé's Finest Hour leads off with a Decca recording from 1944 but otherwise concentrates on Tormé's stints with the Coral and Verve labels between 1953-1960. Tormé's tight arrangements and smooth crooning made him a natural crossover artist, but he charted no pop hits during this period. Nonetheless, the recordings compiled here are broadly appealing, particularly on songs such as "What Is This Thing Called Love?" that prominently feature Tormé's jazz-pop vocal group, the Mel-Tones. "At the Crossroads (Malagueña)" vacillates between Bill Haley-style rock-a-boogie rhythms and big-band swing, and "What's New at the Zoo?" -- a duet with Margaret Whiting -- is a silly novelty with a rock & roll guitar solo. "The Hut Sut Song" and Slim Gaillard's "Cement Mixer" are novelties, too, but ones that jazz purists will find less offensive. In between, there are a number of serious jazz vocal performances and sweetly orchestrated romantic ballads of the sort that earned Tormé the nickname of "the Velvet Fog." Tormé's 1954 recording of his holiday standard "The Christmas Song" is also included, making Mel Tormé's Finest Hour an inclusive and diverse sampling of music from a versatile artist and exemplary vocalist. © Greg Adams /TiVo