Similar artists

Albums

$16.49
$14.49

Rock - Released October 31, 2011 | The Echo Label Limited

Hi-Res Distinctions Hi-Res Audio
$20.99
$17.99

Metal - Released September 24, 1990 | CAPITOL CATALOG MKT (C92)

Hi-Res
$18.99

Metal - Released January 1, 2012 | Capitol Records

Booklet
Megadeth guns for arena thrash success and gets it on Countdown to Extinction. Following the lead of 1991's Metallica, Megadeth trades in their lengthy, progressive compositions for streamlined, tightly written and played songs more conducive to radio and MTV airplay. Cries of "sellout" seem pointless when the results are artistically (as well as commercially) successful; songs like the mega-hit "Symphony of Destruction," "Skin O' My Teeth," "Foreclosure of a Dream," and "Sweating Bullets" are among the band's best. ~ Steve Huey
$17.49
$15.49

Metal - Released June 8, 2018 | Columbia - Legacy

Hi-Res
First attempt, first hit. Dave Mustaine does much more than just bouncing back, two years after his forced exit from Metallica. He not only put together a commando that straightaway positioned itself among the top four uncontested leaders of the new trash scene, but he also composed tracks that provide irrefutable proof that he was much more than a supporting role to Lars Ulrich, James Hetfield and Cliff Burton, before being suddenly replaced by Kirk Hammett on the brink of recording Kill 'em All. While it’s not an exact twin of Metallica’s first album, it undeniably appears to be a close cousin. In fact, they even have one track in common, as Mechanix is a boosted version – with the original lyrics – of The Four Horsemen, one of the three songs he co-authored and that were featured on Metallica’s first project. There’s no weak spot throughout the entire album, and the demonic version of These Boots Are Made for Walkin' (shortened as These Boots here), popularized in 1966 by Nancy Sinatra, reclaims its place, even if Dave Mustaine had to re-record the vocals with the original text of its author, Lee Hazlewood, who had threatened to sue if the band continued to exploit the song using modified lyrics. This new and “ultimate” version also features a few bonuses. In addition to the demos already available on previous re-editions, Mustaine seems to have found a few previously unreleased live tapes (on VHS!) in his attic. But the main point is that the album finally received the level of production it deserved back in 1985. Mark Lewis (Trivium, DevilDriver, Deicide, Cannibal Corpse…) remixed it, achieving a careful update without affecting its freshness and original dynamic, and the mastering was carried out by the great master Ted Jensen (Metallica, The Beatles, The Eagles, Evanescence, Green Day, Bob Marley, The Rolling Stones, AC/DC, Pantera, Machine Head…). This Killing Is My Business… And Business Is Good – a title inspired by the comic superhero The Punisher, which might be addressed to Metallica… − undoubtedly deserved this “final killing”. And, for once, it is in no way dishonest. © Jean-Pierre Sabouret/Qobuz
$12.99

Metal - Released January 22, 2016 | AG Records (Megadeth) 2017

$13.99

Metal - Released January 1, 2004 | Capitol Records

Megadeth's follow-up to the hit Countdown to Extinction lacks the focus of its predecessor, but Youthanasia makes up the difference with more accessible, radio-friendly production and tighter riffs. Unfortunately, they have abandoned some of the more experimental, progressive elements in their music, but those are hardly missed in the jackhammer riffs of tracks like "Train of Consequences." ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
$20.99
$17.99

Metal - Released September 19, 1986 | CAPITOL CATALOG MKT (C92)

Hi-Res
$12.99

Metal - Released May 8, 2007 | The End Records

Megadeth have been through a lot of lineup upheaval circa the early 21st century, with longtime leader Dave Mustaine being the only familiar face left in attendance. But Megadeth's crunchy, venomous thrash has remained intact, as heard throughout their 2007 release, United Abominations (their first for the Roadrunner label). While many thrash-metal bands take the easy way out lyrically -- by detailing their encounters with Señor Beelzebub -- Mustaine has never shied away from voicing his opinion about politics and the state of the world. And as evidenced by such biting tracks as "Washington Is Next!," "Gears of War," "Amerikhastan," and the title track, Mustaine remains as outspoken as ever about what he's been seeing on CNN for the past few years. Musically, Megadeth were never afraid to show off their prog-worthy chops, and the 2007 lineup (which sees Mustaine joined by bassist James LoMenzo and the sibling tandem of Glen Drover and Shawn Drover on guitar and drums) appears custom-made for tackling "tricky bits" -- including the album-opening "Sleepwalker." Elsewhere, a re-recording of "A Tout le Monde" -- as a duet between Mustaine and Lacuna Coil's Cristina Scabbia -- has "radio/MTV airplay" written all over it. They may have lost the plot for a period (remember 1999's Risk?), but with United Abominations, Mustaine and company certainly sound reborn. [The 2007 Roadrunner edition includes one bonus track.] ~ Greg Prato
$10.49

Rock - Released January 1, 2005 | Capitol Records

Dave Mustaine revived Megadeth in the mid-2000s, remastering and reissuing his band's entire Capitol catalog and hitting the concert circuit in earnest. Greatest Hits is part of that revival. It's the second Megadeth best-of, replacing the one from five years prior, Capitol Punishment. Greatest Hits is an improvement, loaded with 17 selections, three more than its predecessor. There's also some fancy packaging and a hyperbolic "Love Live Megadeth" tribute written by Penelope Spheeris, the colorful director of The Decline of Western Civilization, Pt. 2: The Metal Years. It all adds up to a nice package, or more precisely, a sampler of Megadeth, from the band's pioneering thrash metal years to its later growing pains, with an unfortunate de-emphasis on the band's beginnings. Like the previous best-of released by Capitol, Greatest Hits overlooks much of Megadeth's prime years in favor of a balanced sample of selections from every album released by the label. There's going to be a large chunk of the market that is going to groan about this approach, since the early thrash years are the reason most Megadeth fans are fans in the first place, and also the reason why the band has been able to ramble on all these years despite some mostly dull new music. Since Megadeth released so many albums for Capitol, there's never room here for more than two tracks per album: Peace Sells, Rust in Peace, Countdown to Extinction, and Youthanasia get two representations, the rest get only one. Such breadth doesn't make for the best listening experience, especially because the disc hopscotches through time. That quibble aside, Greatest Hits does give you a sample of every Megadeth album, even duds like Risk. If you're serious about getting into this band, however, you're best off going through the albums one by one. The good ones are good all the way through; if you like "Peace Sells," you're going to like Peace Sells. But if you're just curious and would like a broad one-disc sampler, Greatest Hits is your ticket. You'll end up with a good understanding of Megadeth -- old and not as old, good and not as good -- and what to expect from each album, of which there are a couple stone-cold classics. ~ Jason Birchmeier
$10.49

Metal - Released January 1, 2004 | Capitol Records

A largely uninspired effort recorded with a new guitarist and drummer, So Far, So Good...So What! lacks the conceptual unity and musical bite of Peace Sells, which helps push much of its lyrical material into the realm of self-parody, as Mustaine rants about the PMRC, the apocalypse, ex-girlfriends, and other people he is angry with, while hinting at the depth of his substance abuse problem with "502," a paean to driving drunk. The album wants to sound threatening but mostly comes off as forced and somewhat juvenile; typical is the embarrassing cover of "Anarchy in the U.K.," which is played in Megadeth's tightly controlled riffing style and without the looseness of the original, making it sound stilted and stiff -- and Mustaine doesn't even get the lyrics right. This one is for diehards only. ~ Steve Huey
$12.99

Rock - Released July 14, 1992 | Capitol Records

Megadeth guns for arena thrash success and gets it on Countdown to Extinction. Following the lead of 1991's Metallica, Megadeth trades in their lengthy, progressive compositions for streamlined, tightly written and played songs more conducive to radio and MTV airplay. Cries of "sellout" seem pointless when the results are artistically (as well as commercially) successful; songs like the mega-hit "Symphony of Destruction," "Skin O' My Teeth," "Foreclosure of a Dream," and "Sweating Bullets" are among the band's best. ~ Steve Huey
$10.49

Metal - Released March 1, 2017 | Sanctuary Records

After leaving Capitol and losing longtime guitarist Marty Friedman, Megadeth felt that a retooling was in order. Risk had been the culmination of their move toward commercial accessibility, so much so that the album engendered a backlash among fans. So, they attempted to craft a more metallic record with The World Needs a Hero, going so far as to resurrect early-years mascot Vic Rattlehead for a gory cover that just screams heavy metal. And The World Needs a Hero does indeed prove to be the band's heaviest offering in quite some time, certainly much more so than Risk. In fact, fans who just want to hear the group play straight-up metal will probably find this their best album since Rust in Peace or Countdown to Extinction -- and Dave Mustaine tries to conjure memories of both. "Return to Hangar" is a sequel to Rust's prog-thrash classic "Hangar 18"; the new lyrics are in the same meter, but recited over a much simpler riff (shades of Metallica's "Unforgiven II," anyone?). Album closer "When" nicks riffs from Metallica's "Am I Evil?" cover; meanwhile, "Dread and the Fugitive Mind" (which first appeared on Capitol Punishment) has a growly recitation and stop-start riff straight out of "Sweating Bullets." These tracks point up the album's biggest problem: too much of the material feels like rehashed Megadeth Lite. Most cuts are taken at medium-to-slow tempos, and Mustaine's production is still pretty radio-friendly, which means that the group never quite kicks up the fury or flash of past glories. As a result, the aggression Mustaine tries to whip up for his trademark lyrical melodramas often sounds forced, especially on the banal breakup drama "1000 Times Goodbye." The World Needs a Hero is as professional as one would expect, but the album as a whole never quite catches fire, leaving it feeling too much like Megadeth-by-numbers; one can't help but wonder if the group has many ideas left. ~ Steve Huey
$12.99

Metal - Released November 1, 1994 | CAPITOL CATALOG MKT (C92)

$12.99

Metal - Released February 15, 2019 | Sanctuary Records

$12.99

Metal - Released February 15, 2019 | Sanctuary Records

$12.99

Metal - Released April 26, 2002 | Epic

$10.49

Metal - Released March 1, 2017 | Sanctuary Records

The System Has Failed marks a return from the dead for Megadeth -- and quite a glorious return, it must be said. When bandleader Dave Mustaine was diagnosed in early 2002 with radial neuropathy -- strained nerves in his left arm and hand -- the snarling guitar shredder was forced to disband his once groundbreaking group after nearly two decades of activity. Granted, it wasn't that big of a loss at the time, chiefly so because Megadeth had long passed its prime. The band's key recordings date back to the speed metal era, from 1986 (the year of Peace Sells, Reign in Blood, and Master of Puppets) to 1992 (the year Megadeth, like Metallica a year earlier, made a distinct, more commercial shift, releasing Countdown to Extinction -- to the dismay of many longtime fans). Following Countdown, Megadeth struggled. The band continued to release albums, but they weren't well received and, very sadly, one of metal's once preeminent acts became a bitter has-been. So after Mustaine's injury, the disbanding of Megadeth didn't seem all that unfortunate at the time -- it seemed overdue, some would argue. Then in 2004, shortly after an exemplary reissue campaign, Mustaine resurrected Megadeth for The System Has Failed. And frankly, the band hasn't sounded this vital since Countdown to Extinction, if not Rust in Peace (to risk overstating just how much of a return to glory this album is). Mustaine is joined on guitar by Chris Poland, the very talented guitarist whom he'd fired after the masterful Peace Sells album back in the day. It's a surprise return, and no doubt a very exciting one for fans of Peace Sells (note the shred-fest "Kick the Chair" in particular). That re-pairing of Mustaine and Poland alone makes The System Has Failed worthwhile, but there are also the songs themselves. Put simply, they're ferocious! No, this isn't a good old-fashioned thrash album, but you can tell Mustaine is going for that vibe, especially on songs like "Back in the Day," one in particular that should give dyed-in-the-wool headbangers a giddy sense of déjà vu. The System Has Failed is actually more of a synthesis, taking the reckless abandon of pre-Countdown Megadeth and infusing it with the melodic songwriting of latter-day diamonds in the rough like "Symphony of Destruction" and "A Tout le Monde." Add to this some especially thoughtful lyrics (archly political, nakedly personal, and shamelessly mature), and you have the recipe for an excellent, damn near perfect Megadeth album, up there with Peace Sells, Rust in Peace, and Countdown -- as unlikely as that may seem. Regardless of where The System Has Failed ranks alongside Megadeth's other standout albums, however, it most certainly blows away practically every other aboveground metal album of 2004. No joke. This is the sort of latter-day masterpiece Metallica struggled in vain for a decade-plus to record to no avail. ~ Jason Birchmeier
$7.49

Metal - Released August 31, 1999 | Capitol Records

In many ways, Megadeth's career trajectory has run parallel to Metallica's; both bands started out as speed-metal outfits, then broadened into technically adept progressive thrash, and in the early '90s, streamlined and slowed down their songs for mass-market acceptance. While that mainstreaming process was initially viewed as both commercially and artistically successful, it also meant that neither band represented heavy metal's cutting edge any longer. As MTV combined its appetite for new trends with decreased music programming, Megadeth found themselves unable to rely on it or a cultish underground fan base to promote their music. So, they began to concentrate on a medium that had all but ignored them during the '80s: album-rock radio. Certainly, radio had become more willing to accept their music as time passed, and Megadeth cultivated that more conservative audience with polished production and reduced fury. And that's what they continued to do with 1999's Risk. To their credit, Megadeth never went as far as trying to reshape their sound around AOR's rampant '70s worship, so even if their music lost a good deal of its danger and excitement, it has aged gracefully (something that can't always be said of Metallica's '90s output). Risk is not much of a departure from its two predecessors; more reflective, melodic, and conventional than the Megadeth of old, it delivers a well-played set of hard rock tunes suitable for metal and AOR fans alike. Some of those tunes are catchier than others, and they're enough to carry the album if you're a fan of this style. Even if the album's title is a misnomer, it's startling to see Megadeth still around -- and still successful. ~ Steve Huey
$39.49

Rock - Released January 1, 2007 | Capitol Records

The canonization of Megadeth that began in 2002 with the remixed edition of the band's debut, Killing Is My Business...And Business Is Good! (1985), continued over the years with further deluxe-packaged, remastered reissues of each studio album, and ultimately led to Warchest, a massive five-disc (four CDs, one DVD) box set boasting over six hours of music, including 33 previously unreleased tracks. There's something for everyone -- from longtime fans to neophytes -- in this box, which is similar in both approach and packaging to Slayer's five-disc Soundtrack to the Apocalypse (2003). The first three discs of Warchest are a chronological survey of the Megadeth catalog to date. The first disc covers the time frame spanning Killing Is My Business...And Business Is Good! (1985), Peace Sells...But Who's Buying? (1986), So Far, So Good...So What! (1988), and Rust in Peace (1990); the second covers Countdown to Extinction (1992) and Youthanasia (1994); and the third covers Cryptic Writings (1997), Risk (1999), The World Needs a Hero (2001), and The System Has Failed (2004). Previously unreleased items are interspersed throughout, keeping with the chronological sequencing. The most notable of these are an unabridged session take of "Anarchy in the U.K." (circa So Far, So Good) that segues into "Problems," another Sex Pistols song; a few Rust in Peace demos ("Holy Wars," "Tornado of Souls," "The Five Magics"); and live performances (circa 1992) of several Countdown to Extinction songs. There's also the entire fourth disc, a high-quality live recording of a concert at Wembley Stadium in London on October 16, 1990. The audio is amazing, with stereo separation of the guitars, and toward the end of the concert, former Diamond Head lead vocalist Sean Harris joins the band on-stage to sing "It's Electric." The fifth disc, the DVD, is another live performance, this one at Hammersmith Odeon in London on September 30, 1992. Warchest also comes with an informative booklet laden with photos and discographical notes. If there's a major complaint that could be filed against Warchest, it's that it includes precious little of Megadeth's three key albums: Peace Sells, Rust in Peace, and Countdown to Extinction. But this complaint doesn't carry much weight, because the songs from those albums are indeed here in alternate versions (for instance, the live recordings are primarily of songs from these three albums), and also because any Megadeth fan will want to have those classic albums in full anyhow. ~ Jason Birchmeier
$14.49

Metal - Released October 26, 2011 | The Echo Label Limited

Megadeth's 13th studio album, and first since 2001’s The World Needs a Hero to utilize the talents of bassist/founding member Dave Ellefson, was produced by Johnny K (Staind, Disturbed) and features a combination of newly composed tracks, along with older cuts written years ago but never put to tape. Darker, heavier, and more immediate than 2009's Endgame, Dave Mustaine's snarling vocals ride higher in the mix this time around, but fans need not fear, as his fleet fingers are still possessed with the power to conjure the dead. Much of the aptly named Th1rt3en feels vintage, from the familiar political themes on “We the People” and the tightly wound, Dio-esque riffing on “Public Enemy No. 1” to the soft, melodramatic military snare intro of “Never Dead,” which eventually explodes into a wicked blast of retro-thrash that feels positively invigorating, not redundant. Elsewhere, the melodic slow-burn “Millennium of the Blind” fuses Ten Years After's “I’d Love to Change the World” and Metallica's “Fade to Black” into an anti-corporation/war rant that calls out the “millennials” on their submissiveness, the snaky “Black Swan” casts long shadows that mimic “Symphony of Destruction,” and first single “Sudden Death” stands defiant before the skeptics who thought that Mustaine's newfound faith would render him bereft of the old ultraviolence. ~ James Christopher Monger