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Classical - Released October 2, 2015 | PentaTone

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 Sterne Fono Forum Klassik
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Chamber Music - Released February 3, 2015 | PentaTone

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Gramophone Editor's Choice
Cellist Matt Haimovitz and pianist Christopher O'Riley released their first album together in 2011, an eclectic program of clever crossover arrangements titled Shuffle.Play.Listen. Haimovitz is well-known for bringing a contemporary attitude to his performances, often performing in clubs instead of classical venues, and his interest in making exciting music with a popular feeling has won him a big following. For this 2014 hybrid SACD release on PentaTone, though, Haimovitz and O'Riley turn their attention to the pinnacle of classical music for cello and piano, the five cello sonatas of Ludwig van Beethoven. With his fans sure to follow where he leads, Haimovitz doesn't need to add anything to this music to spice it up, and he and O'Riley approach the sonatas and three sets of variations with seriousness and dedication, if not exactly reverence. While the sonatas are played as straight as the title suggests, Haimovitz and O'Riley play with considerable emotion and élan, yet avoid making their performances seem like an academic recital. There is a lot of personality here, chiefly Haimovitz's, and even though the music was performed on period instruments, the cello's sound is robust, and the fortepiano is far from fragile. Still, this set might represent too much freedom for period-style purists, so these energetic performances might not be for everybody and sampling is advised. [N.B. In the album's listing, tracks 4 and 8 are reversed.] © TiVo
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Chamber Music - Released June 3, 2016 | PentaTone

Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
Franz Schubert composed nothing for solo cello, but there is a way cellists can still program his music. Matt Haimovitz's 2016 release on PentaTone offers the Arpeggione Sonata in A minor, D 821, and the String Quintet in C major, D 956, two works that are important to cellists, despite being a bit of a compromise solution for soloists. The arpeggione was a bowed six-stringed instrument, similar to a viola da gamba, that enjoyed a brief vogue in the 1820s, but fell into obscurity well before Schubert's sonata for the instrument was published in 1871. With some modifications, the work has been transcribed for various instruments, but it is most often performed as a cello sonata, and Haimovitz is among the many cellists who perform this arrangement of the piece. His performance with pianist Itamar Golan is balanced and sensitive, and the cello line is intensely lyrical, emphasizing the sonata's song-like feeling. The String Quintet was scored for a standard string quartet and an additional cello part, which is often taken by prominent cellists. Haimovitz joins the Miró Quartet in this expansive performance, and he blends into the ensemble with ease, playing as an equal rather than as a guest artist. The audiophile sound of both recordings is wonderful for its details and clarity, and PentaTone's super audio technology gives the performances depth and vibrant presence. © TiVo
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Chamber Music - Released March 16, 2018 | PentaTone

Booklet
This is a re-release of a recording from 2005: and even back then, Matt Haimovitz was enthusiastically exploring unusual repertoires, like these Preludes and Fugues by Bach, transcribed by Mozart in 1782. In fact, Mozart didn't only take pieces from the Well-tempered Clavier: he also borrowed fugues from The Art of the Fugue, with two sonatas for organ, and even something from Wilhelm Friedmann. As for the adagio preludes, four are by Mozart himself: only two are taken from the Cantor. This selection represents a kind of bridge connecting Bach and Mozart, as much in terms of form as content. The piece for string trio is wholly the work of the divine Wolfgang Amadeus: this piece isn't a transposition by any of our other three compères. Another 100% Mozart offering is the fantastic Divertimento KV 563 from 1788, the only work for string trio within this collection, aside from the explorations of Bach's catalogue. The E-flat major scale – the same as used on The Magic Flute – and the dedication to Mozart's fellow lodge-member Michael Puchberg (who was also a very generous friend, frequently rescuing Mozart from dire financial straits) make this piece a favourite among Freemasons. It includes a magisterial demonstration of how, even when limited to a string trio, Mozart could still conjure up a symphonic spirit and a tragic atmosphere, in particular in the heart-rending Adagio and the no-less moving minor variations on the Andante. The greatest of Mozart, achieved with strikingly scanty means. © SM/Qobuz
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Chamber Music - Released November 6, 2020 | PentaTone

Hi-Res Booklet
The vibrant musical palette of cellist Matt Haimovitz and the graceful insight of pianist Mari Kodama exquisitely meld in "MON AMI, Mon amour". Cello and piano remain in constant, colorful conversation for rarities by sisters Lili and Nadia Boulanger, in Debussy’s neo-Baroque Sonata, and in the effervescent world of Poulenc’s Cello Sonata. Ravel’s poignant Kaddish and Milhaud’s hopeful Élégie, composed at the end of World War II, round out a program which, even in times of darkness, never loses sight of its joie de vivre. Two Fauré gems are included, the virtuosic Papillon and the breathtaking Après un rêve, with its longing for a mysterious night and an elusive, ecstatic love. © Pentatone
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Classical - Released September 2, 2016 | PentaTone

Hi-Res Booklet
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Classical - Released May 8, 2020 | PentaTone

Matt Haimovitz’s multi-faceted cello knocks down musical boundaries while scaling emotions from darkness to joy in "Cello Jazz", a wide-ranging playlist featuring some of Haimovitz’s hottest collaborators. Classics like Billy Strayhorn’s haunting Blood Count, George Gershwin’s languid Liza, and Miles Davis’s bebop Half Nelson are reborn in inventive arrangements by modern master David Sanford, who contributes his own big band cello concerto, Scherzo grosso, and the intense Seventh Avenue Kaddish, a solo tour-de-force. Piazzolla’s Le Grand Tango and DJ Olive’s dreamy Trans resonate alongside the “brilliantly inventive” (The New York Times AKOKA, with stellar clarinetist David Krakauer, and the jubilant musical playground of Aaron Jay Kernis’s First Club Date. Peak bliss is unlocked with two John McLaughlin tracks from the Grammy-nominated "Meeting of the Spirits", with Haimovitz’s maverick band of cello warriors, Uccello. © Pentatone
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Chamber Music - Released September 29, 2017 | PentaTone

Hi-Res Booklet
It is not clear just what the "troika" of the title refers to, but one can imagine two possibilities: the album is taking up the title of the "Troika" section from the Suite from Lieutenant Kijé by Prokofiev, the troika in question being a Russian sledge pulled by three horses, hence the name. But it could also refer to a triumvirate made up of the great Russian composers: Rachmaninov, Prokofiev and Shostakovich, each of whom is represented her by one sonata for cello and piano. But then: why not both? In any case, cellist Matt Haimovitz and his pianist companion Christopher O’Riley offer up a superb range of major works, supplemented with a few gems, some of which quite dark: the explosive version (by both artists) of a cello and piano transcription of Virgin Prayer: Put Putin Away, which won three members of the group Pussy Riot some time in labour camp for this punk blasphemy; as well as a version of the Beatles' Back in the USSR, and another number from the Russian rock star Viktor Tsoi. Haimovitz, known for his forays into less-classical territory, follows his own rule - which in no way detracts from the extraordinary musical quality of this album. © SM/Qobuz
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Classical - Released February 5, 2016 | PentaTone

Booklet
The boundaries between rock and classical are erased here not just by juxtaposition but by cognizance of interpenetration. © TiVo
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Classical - Released August 7, 2015 | PentaTone

Booklet
Matt Haimovitz's Orbit is a compilation of tracks from his albums Anthem, Goulash!, After Reading Shakespeare, Figment, and Matteo. © TiVo
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Classical - Released January 1, 2005 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Classical - Released January 24, 2020 | PentaTone

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From a deeply stirring Mass to hauntingly re-imagined Leonard Cohen masterpieces, "Luna Pearl Woolf: Fire and Flood" encompasses 25 years of vocal works by composer Luna Pearl Woolf, as performed by the Choir of Trinity Wall Street, cellist Matt Haimovitz, and more, conducted by Julian Wachner. In her penetrating album notes, New York Times contributing writer Corinna Da Fonseca-Wollheim comments, “Luna Pearl Woolf trains a zoom lens on the collective experience, sometimes plunging us right into the midst of destruction and anarchy only to pull back, in one swoop, to a clear-eyed plane of compassion”. These arresting works include her frequently-performed cello-choir concerto, Après moi, le deluge, which emerges from the tragic aftermath of Hurricane Katrina; and the dramatic, low-voiced To the Fire, with its prophetic, Old Testament text. In One to One to One, “three female singers reflect and refract the male gaze in an uproar of vocal virtuosity” (Da Fonseca-Wollheim); while Missa in Fines Orbis Terrae journeys to the ends of the earth in search of revelation, mercy, peace. Finally, two inventive arrangements for three voices and cello create a kaleidoscopic expansion of colors and timbres in Cohen’s ironic Everybody Knows and foreboding Who By Fire. Noted among a new generation of politically conscious and artistically progressive composers, Woolf has been heard widely across North America and in Europe. Her music is praised by The New York Times for its “psychological nuances and emotional depth”. © Pentatone
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Classical - Released January 1, 1989 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Classical - Released April 4, 2006 | Oxingale Records

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Classical - Released June 21, 2019 | PentaTone

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Classical - Released June 2, 2017 | PentaTone

Booklet
After establishing an auspicious but fairly conventional career as a cello soloist, Matt Haimovitz began around 2000 to broaden the scope of his playing to include more and more contemporary works, and to launch an ambitious series of commissions for new pieces. The Kronos Quartet had early on turned to arrangements of music by Bill Evans, Jimi Hendrix, and Thelonious Monk, pieces rarely, if ever, heard in classical concert halls, and Haimovitz's Meeting of the Spirits builds on that tradition. It includes arrangements of jazz classics by John McLaughlin, Miles Davis, Ornette Coleman, John Lewis, Billy Strayhorn, George Gershwin, and Charles Mingus scored for cello ensemble and assorted other instruments. The arrangements, by David Sanford (who is also represented by an original piece), manage to retain the spirit and loose-limbed energy of the originals and don't compromise their integrity as jazz. It's easy to hear these tracks essentially as covers of familiar songs. The performers aren't merely aping the originals, but bringing their individuality and an improvisational freedom to the pieces. The most noticeable difference from the originals is the timbre of the instruments; it's not typical to hear cellists play these pieces, but the fit sounds natural and unforced. John McLaughlin makes a guest appearance on his "Open Country Joy," and Uccello, Haimovitz's cello ensemble, is joined in several pieces by electric guitar, drums, and keyboard. Many of the tracks feature the cellos alone, calling on them to emulate the sound of a pizzicato bass and to use their instruments percussively. The CD is beautifully engineered, with a sound that's clean, detailed, and vividly present. © Stephen Eddins /TiVo
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Classical - Released April 4, 2006 | Oxingale Records

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Classical - Released January 1, 2003 | TransArt Live

For its energetic performances of Haydn's two Cello Concertos, this live recording by cellist Matt Haimovitz and the Orchestre de Bretagne, under Stefan Sanderling, is a decent offering, though not ideal because of its unnecessarily harsh sound quality, due to upfront miking. The volume needs to be somewhat reduced to appreciate the intended effect of Haimovitz's playing -- which is robust and confident -- without being irritated by the resin-like scraping that always comes with close-up recording. But most listeners who already have a cherished CD of Haydn's concertos will skip ahead anyway to hear what Haimovitz does in the world-premiere recording of Mozart's Cello Concerto in D major (rather, the arrangement by George Szell of two movements from the Oboe Concerto in C major, K. 314, and the Andante, K. 470). While the music itself is unchanged in all other respects, the transposition an octave lower for the solo cello puts it in the same range as the harmonic voices in the strings, and this placement tends to absorb its distinctive edge. In terms of sound quality, this recording is less abrasive than the Haydn renditions, though its somewhat muffled tone is not especially desirable, either. In consideration of the problematic reproduction, this CD is acceptable, but not recommended as a first choice, even with the Mozart/Szell offering. © TiVo
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Classical - Released July 12, 2019 | PentaTone

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Classical - Released March 5, 2013 | Albany

Booklet