Your basket is empty

Categories :

Similar artists

Albums

CD$18.99

Concertos - Released November 10, 2014 | Warner Classics

Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or - 4F de Télérama - Gramophone Editor's Choice - 4 étoiles Classica
CD$21.49

Classical - Released May 13, 2016 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - Gramophone Editor's Choice - Choc de Classica
Most of these recordings were made in 1960, when the pianist Martha Argerich was just 18; there is a fearsomely proficient Prokofiev Piano Sonata No. 7 in B flat major, Op. 83, from seven years later, after Argerich had won the Chopin Piano Competition and was on her way to stardom. The recordings are taken from radio broadcasts that are quite good sonically by 1960 standards, and they give abundant evidence of why those in the know spotted the young Argentine and began to give her bigger opportunities. Sample the opening movement of the Beethoven Piano Sonata No. 7 in D minor, Op. 10, No. 3 (CD 1, track 4). Argerich imparts a kind of restless push to this slow introduction that fits it very well. In general she takes fast tempos, but exerts iron control over the music, and in the outer movements of the late Piano Sonata in D major, K. 576, of Mozart, this is very effective indeed. The second disc of the CD set is devoted to show pieces by Prokofiev and Ravel, and the duality of intellectual music done with flair and bravura and virtuoso works done with a probing attention to structure has sustained Argerich throughout her career. Highly recommended for Argerich fans, and really for anybody. © TiVo
CD$15.49

Classical - Released May 13, 2013 | Warner Classics

Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - Gramophone Record of the Month - Gramophone Editor's Choice
The annual Lugano Festival gives Martha Argerich an opportunity to showcase her friends in live recordings that are released in box sets from Warner. The 10th package in the series, highlighting the 2012 summer festival, presents three CDs of lively and engaging performances, most notably of Argerich as soloist in a reading of Mozart's Piano Concerto No. 25 with the Orchestra della Svizzera Italiana, while others capture her playing with longtime colleagues and rising musicians who share her enthusiasm for chamber and keyboard music. Among the special treats are a performance of Mahler's Piano Quartet in A minor by pianist Lily Maisky, violinist Sascha Maisky, violist Lyda Chen, and cellist Mischa Maisky; a two-piano performance of Brahms' Variations on a Theme of Haydn by Argerich and Nicholas Angelich; and perhaps most astonishing, a three-piano transcription of Debussy's La Mer, played by Giorgia Tomassi, Carlo Maria Griguoli, and Alessandro Stella. Argerich is also joined by her friend Maria João Pires in Mozart's Sonata in D major for piano four-hands, and cellist Gautier Capuçon and violinist Renaud Capuçon make special appearances with Argerich in chamber works by Schumann and Prokofiev, respectively. © TiVo
HI-RES$14.99
CD$12.99

Classical - Released January 1, 1995 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Hi-Res Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography - Hi-Res Audio
HI-RES$20.99
CD$17.99

Concertos - Released September 1, 2017 | Warner Classics

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - 4 étoiles Classica
The previous batch from the 2015 Lugano Festival was especially rich, with many of the chosen moments being particularly thrilling (Brahms’ Trio, Poulenc’s Sonata for two pianos). The 2016 Festival would in turn see one great event: the tremendous Martha agreed to play on stage, for the first time in more than thirty years, Ravel’s Gaspard de la nuit. She was worried at the thought of measuring herself against her own success from forty years ago—she recorded in 1974 for Deutsche Grammophon a Ravel LP featuring Gaspard, Sonatine and Valses nobles et sentimentales, which is still in everyone’s memory despite its disappointing sound recording. On the spot, it’s obviously all the magic from a sound completely revealing itself, and the permanence of a vision. The truly haunted tone of Le Gibet leaves a lasting impression, Scarbo’s goblin literally shatters when Ondine, completely radiant, screams her recollections of Liszt and remembers just as much Une barque sur l’océan written a few years before. The rest of the testimonies from this 2016 Lugano Festival is as varied as usual. We’ll start with the rarity among the musical repertoire that is Busoni’s Violin Concerto, in D major (like the ones from Beethoven, Brahms, Tchaikovsky), also being the opus 35 (like the ones from Tchaikovsky, Korngold), under Renaud Capuçon’s determined bow. As for the two pianos, a classic from Argerich’s repertoire, Mozart Sonata for Two Pianos K. 488 that she’s enjoyed playing regularly with her friends for a few years, here with Sergey Babayan. And let’s not forget the very sincere Horn Trio from Brahms, with the trio Capuçon, Angelich & Guerrier (in 2015, a version without horn was unforgettable), or especially Bach’s Sonata by Martha Argerich and Tedi Papavrami, which could make us forget to not have this duo play the five other works written by Bach for the same formation. We cannot ignore the too short moment from the duo Tiempo & Lechner, as thrilling as ever, here in two Falla’s dances. During this 2016 edition, Argerich also played Ravel’s Concerto in G major. Maybe not in its most extraordinary version, but listening to its phrasings, accents, and nuances that are so personal in the Adagio assai this work remains the source of a rare emotion. May this Lugano Festival resuscitate in a few years with the participation of generous sponsors nostalgic of these incredible moments. © PYL
CD$18.99

Classical - Released February 28, 2011 | Warner Classics

Distinctions 5 de Diapason - Gramophone Editor's Choice
Martha Argerich's involvement with chamber music has dominated the later part of her career, so it's easy to think of her name with the words "and friends" tacked on, and to visualize the large and diverse retinue of famous musicians who have recorded with her. This triple-disc box set from EMI Classics presents live recordings from the 2010 Progetto Martha Argerich in Lugano, several of them collaborations with Argerich, notably in works by Robert Schumann, Franz Liszt, and Béla Bartók, as well as a performance of Frédéric Chopin's Piano Concerto No. 1 in E minor, where she is the featured soloist with the Orchestra della Svizzera Italiana. Fans of Argerich, for whom money is no object, may buy this set on the strength of these four recordings, overlooking the eight other performances that do not include her. But other listeners may balk, feeling that the packaging is misleading and the program is lopsided, offering much less of Argerich than the title and cover photo suggest. In any event, these performances are a mixed lot in a program that includes loud, bravura playing and quieter pieces and subtler reflections, and from a roster of some of the leading musicians regularly performing in Europe. Violinist Renaud Capuçon and cellist Gautier Capuçon are perhaps the best known, and each performs with Argerich in pieces by Schumann. Celebrated pianist Stephen Kovacevich also joins Argerich in the Bartók Sonata for two pianos and percussion, so this certainly is noteworthy for the match-up. But the rest of the set should be sampled before purchase, because name recognition is not enough to guarantee satisfaction. EMI's sound quality is good, considering the concert venue. © TiVo
HI-RES$14.99
CD$12.99

Classical - Released April 7, 2015 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
HI-RES$17.99
CD$14.99

Symphonic Music - Released November 1, 2017 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 4 étoiles Classica
HI-RES$21.99
CD$18.99

Concertos - Released May 13, 2016 | Warner Classics

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or
HI-RES$17.99
CD$14.99

Classical - Released March 23, 2018 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or
Nestled up cosily with Sergei Babayan, gazing into the distance, rather like Juliet next to Romeo, Martha Argerich seems to have had an eye on marketing when she produced the "Prokofiev for Two" album cover for her longstanding publisher, Deutsche Grammophon. Although well-known, these works haven't yet been released in this format: each of the 19 pieces is an accomplished transcription by Sergei Babayan. More than half of this album is given over to extracts from the ballet Romeo and Juliet, originally a symphonic work, but one that sounds devilishly good when brought to life by these two exceptional pianists. The remainder of the album is made up of various pieces of stage music, from Hamlet, Eugene Onegin and the opera War and Peace. This is a reinvigorating album, with an eighty-year-old Martha Argerich who has lost none of her extraordinary technique. As for the Armenian pianist Sergei Babayan, a student of Mikhail Pletnev and a teacher of Daniil Trifonov, he seems to be having great fun with his own transcriptions alongside his long-time partner and friend. © François Hudry/Qobuz
CD$10.49

Classical - Released January 1, 2010 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Distinctions Choc de Classica
One of the great things about this collection of Martha Argerich's Chopin performances for German radio broadcasts is that many of the pieces are new to her official discography. This includes half a dozen mazurkas, a couple of nocturnes, an etude, and a ballade, all in deeply probing, intensely expressive, astoundingly virtuosic performances. The other great thing is that Argerich's performances of pieces she has already recorded commercially, the B minor Sonata and the three Op. 59 Mazurkas, are just as fine as her previous versions, and very different. Her sonata, for example, sounds as thrillingly emotional as her two canonical recordings, the 1965 EMI and the 1967 Deutsche Grammophon, but it also sounds much more modern: more angular, more aggressive, and more violent in the Finale. Despite the thin quality of the radio sound, these performances certainly deserve to be heard by anyone who knows and admires Argerich's work. © TiVo
CD$10.49

Classical - Released January 1, 1987 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
HI-RES$27.99
CD$24.49

Chamber Music - Released May 19, 2014 | Warner Classics

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
CD$12.99

Classical - Released January 1, 1988 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
CD$76.99

Classical - Released January 1, 2012 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Distinctions Diapason d'or
CD$10.49

Classical - Released January 1, 1983 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
HI-RES$14.99
CD$12.99

Classical - Released January 1, 2011 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Hi-Res Distinctions Hi-Res Audio
HI-RES$11.99
CD$10.49

Classical - Released January 1, 2002 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Hi-Res Distinctions Hi-Res Audio
Even after playing it in concert together the previous summer, Argerich, Kremer, Bashmet, and Maisky still spent five days in Berlin recording Brahms' Piano Quartet in G minor. They spent a Saturday in late February 2003 tuning up and the next four days recording, one day for each movement. On top of that, they practiced every morning back in their hotels. And this is Martha Argerich, Gidon Kremer, Yuri Bashmet, and Mischa Maisky here: not only arguably the four greatest living virtuosos on their instruments, but friends who've been playing chamber music together for decades. How could they have spent six hours recording the opening Allegro? How could they have spent any less? Considering that Argerich, Kremer, Bashmet, and Maisky are also four of the most highly individualistic and idiosyncratic performers in the history of classical music, they probably took five-and-three-quarter hours just working the kinks out. But the results are absolutely worth it: despite all their arduous work, Argerich, Kremer, Bashmet, and Maisky play with unrelenting recklessness, taking musical, dramatic, and -- most of all -- emotional chances few other performers would dare take. Rhythms, tempos, dynamics, phrasing, form, and every note are all infused with their individual and collective technical and interpretive virtuosity. While their performance may be too exciting to listen to every day, it is nevertheless one of the two or three greatest performances of Brahms' Piano Quartet in G minor ever recorded. Deutsche Grammophon's sound is right there in the room with you. © TiVo
CD$31.99

Classical - Released January 1, 2012 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Distinctions 5 de Diapason
CD$25.49

Classical - Released May 27, 2016 | Sony Classical

Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or