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Folk/Americana - Released February 8, 2019 | Sage Arts

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Folk/Americana - Released January 31, 2014 | Sage Arts

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Folk/Americana - Released January 1, 2005 | Sage Arts

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Folk/Americana - Released February 7, 2014 | Sage Arts

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Folk/Americana - Released January 1, 2004 | Sage Arts

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Folk/Americana - Released February 3, 2014 | Sage Arts

Wonderfully eclectic, genre bending, adventurous country-inflected music that works on more levels than it really has any right to, Marley's Ghost's sixth album continues the group's marriage of disparate elements. Uniting country and reggae on "Johnny Too Bad" and melding bagpipes with steel guitars in "River Dunce" are rather unprecedented steps, but Marley's Ghost is just as well suited with straight honky tonk elements like "Nothing but the Past," the faithful reggae of Bob Marley's "Guava Jelly," and the Delta blues of "Key to the Highway." Though everyone might not appreciate the liberties they take, Marley's Ghost proves that when music is made with this much passion and spirit, as well as sharp instrumental chops, the results can be very satisfying. ~ Matt Fink
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Folk/Americana - Released February 2, 2014 | Sage Arts

Commemorating 15 years together, Live at the Freight showcases the tragically overlooked Marley's Ghost in all their versatile glory. Recorded live over June 14-15, 2000, at the Freight and Salvage in Berkeley, CA, the loose, warm atmosphere captures the true greatness of the notably eclectic quartet with 18 studio quality tracks that run just over 70 minutes. A true anomaly, Marley's Ghost jump from pedal steel-drenched reggae ("Stir It Up," "One Love") to old-timey ("Dinah/Jordan Am a Hard Road" and jug band blues ("Old Plank Road"), never sounding even remotely awkward when maneuvering between some of the more disparate influences. Most impressive may be the a cappella renditions of "Story of Job" and the sea shanty "Fiddler's Green," highlighting the group's excellent four-part harmonies. Still, Marley's Ghost is probably most at home in the realm of Western-tinged country-folk, where the majority of the tracks ultimately fall. For a band that is unlikely to ever release a proper "greatest hits" album, this set is as close to definitive as is likely to be released. As such, Live at the Freight is recommended as both an introduction for the uninitiated and a centerpiece for hardcore fans. ~ Matt Fink
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Country - Released June 5, 2012 | Sage Arts

Jubilee, the tenth studio outing from venerable roots music collective Marley's Ghost, celebrates the group's 25th anniversary with a set of six originals and seven covers, all of which were recorded at Nashville's Sound Emporium with the legendary Cowboy Jack Clement at the helm. Dan Wheetman, Jon Wilcox, Mike Phelan, Ed Littlefield Jr., and Jerry Fletcher hardly need any help here, as their many years spent on-stage and in the studio together pay off huge dividends with nary a bead of sweat to show for it, and guest appearances from the likes of Marty Stuart, John Prine, Old Crow Medicine Show, and Emmylou Harris only sweeten the pot. Like previous outings, Jubilee touches on nearly every spectrum of Americana, from soulful country-rock (Levon Helm's "Growin' Trade") to straight-up front-porch bluegrass (Bobby & Shirley Womack's "It's All Over Now"). It's a solid, familiar set that gets by on craftsmanship and sheer good-natured charm, and by the closing number, a typically spirited take on Paul Siebel's "She Made Me Lose My Blues," listeners may find themselves inadvertently yodeling along with the chorus. ~ James Christopher Monger
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Folk/Americana - Released July 16, 2016 | Sage Arts

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Country - Released March 2, 2010 | Sage Arts

The quartet of multi-instrumentalists, singer/songwriters, and amateur folklorists known as Marley's Ghost got its start in the San Francisco Bay Area in the late '80s. They usually balance their repertoire between traditional tunes and originals written in a traditional manner, and are known for arrangements that can veer from folk-rock to reggae while dropping in plenty of gospel, blues, country, old-time music, bluegrass, Celtic, and the odd sea shanty along the way. They've been trying to get some national attention for their music for a long time, and although they've been a major draw at folk festivals for more than a decade, the average music fan has remained vaguely disinterested. Perhaps that's why they decided on a change of direction this time out. They've added a drummer to give the tunes a little more punch, and much of the album was recorded with Cowboy Jack Clement in Nashville with arrangements that stick close to country, albeit mostly acoustic country in a more roots music than Nashville style. "My Love Will Not Change," a Shawn Camp/Billy Burnette tune, is midway between a country two-step and a zydeco hoedown and includes some splendid pedal steel from Ed Littlefield, Jr. and sprightly fiddling from guest Hoot Hester. "Love and Happiness for You," an Emmylou Harris tune, has a laid-back Tex-Mex feel, with new member Jerry Fletcher's piano and sideman Jerry Mishkulin's accordion adding to the tune's melancholy feel. John Hartford's "Here I Am in Love Again" and Don Williams' "Which Way Do We Go" get straightforward country arrangements, the latter with a piano part that recalls Floyd Cramer's work on Hank Locklin's "Please Help Me I'm Falling." The band's originals are a bit more adventurous. Mike Phelan's "Should I Be Singing the Blues?" is midway between a '40s torch song and a mellow bit of Texas swing, while Dan Wheetman's "Don't We All Feel Like That" has a slight Latin tinge in its rhythm and brings to mind the southern Appalachian rhumba of Jesse Winchester. The Ghosts show off their usual multi-instrumental dexterity throughout, but it's possible that this change of direction may alienate old fans without necessarily bringing in any new country and Americana listeners. ~ j. poet
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Folk/Americana - Released February 3, 2014 | Sage Arts