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Pop - Released June 21, 2019 | Columbia

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Pop music – a nebulous term at best – often boils down to one idea: love. From the moment it takes root, to unbridled passion, decay and strife, the topic has dominated the top 40 charts ever since the 60s. It should have been no surprise when Mark Ronson released a 13 track collab album, focalized on the theme of … divorce. Perhaps as a nod to his own fate, he says he was “exhausted with trying to make irrefutably ebullient music”. The DJ-become-mega-producer chose to work with nine different singers, amongst which Angel Olsen, Lykke Li, YEBBA, Alicia Keys and Miley Cyrus. With such a diverse casting, it’s slightly difficult to picture a coherent final product, despite Ronson’s best intentions, who declared “This is the first time, probably, people should be excited to hear the entire album”. His first record since Uptown Special (2015) certainly has a fistful of smash hits, and Late Night Feelings is one of them. Lykke Li’s vocals on the disco-lounge, 70s like single are playful and melancholic. The Swedish singer - mostly known in indie-pop circles – contemplates insomnia, desire and frustration: “: I ask myself a million questions in the dark / I lay in silence, but silence talks”. Post-breakup anxiety and the Anglo-American’s retro beats carry on to True Blue, with Angel Olsen. The indie rock star’s haunting voice is backed by a sultry beat and guitars so drenched in reverb you wonder if they were ever there in the first place, owing as much to Abba as to The Alarm; the track stands out as one of the most fleshed out as well as somber on the album. However, first place unequivocally belongs to Miley Cyrus, on Nothing Breaks Like A Heart. The superstar’s biggest hit since Wrecking Ball in 2013 combines country, dance beats and lo-fi violins in the best sad banger yet. Owing as much to contemporary pop music as to Dolly Parton, it is a masterful tale of the pain, resignation and indifference in the wake of a relationship. A few other songs, such as Knock Knock Knock feat. YEBBA or Find You Again Feat. Camila Cabelo are slightly off mark when it comes to production. The result is an inconsistent yet addictive album. © Alexis Renaudat/Qobuz
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Pop - Released January 12, 2015 | Columbia

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Pop - Released December 2, 2018 | Columbia

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Pop - Released April 13, 2015 | Columbia

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Alternative & Indie - Released September 24, 2010 | Columbia

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Pop - Released January 4, 2019 | Columbia

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Electronic/Dance - Released August 29, 2003 | Elektra Records

Loaded with guest artists and packed with danceable beats, DJ Mark Ronson's first record, Here Comes the Fuzz, is less a showcase for the New York-based artist's turntable skills and more of a radio-friendly pop-rap party album. A rising star on the NYC club scene since the late '90s, the occasional Tommy Hilfiger model previously produced tracks for other hip downtown scenesters, including Saturday Night Live regular Jimmy Fallon as well as singer Nikka Costa and rapper Sean Paul -- both of whom return the favor here. Much in the same way as DJ Shadow's Endtroducing... or the Avalanches' Since I Left You used the Beastie Boys' Paul's Boutique as their template to display an eclectic and voracious record-collecting habit, Ronson's Here Comes the Fuzz mixes funk, hip-hop, soul, and rock into an "everything goes when you're having fun" cocktail. While never displaying the innovative vision or giddy melody-mixing heights of either of those albums, Here Comes the Fuzz does still resonate with the pulse of youthful ego driven by libido and hot wax. To these ends, rappers Ghostface Killah and Nate Dogg take the mic over a funky cowbell and the string section of Dennis Coffey's "Scorpio" on "Ooh Wee." Similarly, Mos Def and M.O.P. add Brooklyn street cred to Ronson's catchy if a bit obvious co-opting of Lenny Kravitz's hit "On the Run." Perhaps most interesting though, are Ronson's attempts at actual songwriting such as on the cosmopolitan disco plea "High," featuring vocalist Aya, and the punk à gogo of "I Suck" with Rivers Cuomo, which finds the Weezer frontman doing his best "Let's Go to Bed"-era Robert Smith warble against a sample from Labi Siffre's "Too Late." ~ Matt Collar
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Pop - Released July 10, 2007 | RCA Records Label

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Pop - Released January 13, 2015 | Columbia

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What do you do when you're a connected and funded musician/producer who, like many others pushing 40 or greater, is disappointed with commercial music made by and for people born after your favorite era of music? If you're Mark Ronson, you dial a Pulitzer-winning novelist, snare a sympathetic group of stars, session giants, and unknowns, including a singer discovered during a talent quest through churches from New Orleans to Chicago, and record another tribute to your childhood soundtrack. Indeed, apart from the involvement of Michael Chabon, whose lyrics color nine of the 11 songs, Uptown Special is business as usual for Ronson and co-pilot Jeff Bhasker. The two songs that don't involve Chabon made the earliest and deepest impressions. Bruno Mars showcase "Uptown Funk," despite aiming for early Time and landing closer to a second-tier trifle -- One Way's "Let's Talk," for instance -- topped pop charts in a number of territories and went platinum in Ronson's native U.K. "Feel Right," led by Mystikal at his vulgar and ebullient best, splits the difference between Bobby Byrd and Son of Bazerk. Everything else was co-written with Chabon, whose somewhat surreal scenes are matched with predominantly hazier and freewheeling sounds. These songs, including two highlights that boast the dynamite rhythm section of Willie Weeks and Steve Jordan, as well as lazing vocals from relative youngsters Andrew Wyatt and Kevin Parker, tend to evoke summery soft rock/smooth soul hybrids of the mid- to late '70s, or certain songs by later practitioners like Phoenix and Daft Punk. "I Can't Lose" is the lone Chabon song that breaks a sweat -- thick, twisted synth funk that borrows from Soho's "Hot Music" and (cleanly) lifts from Snoop Dogg's "Ain't No Fun," featuring newcomer Keyone Starr in the role of Evelyn King (or maybe Mary Jane Girls' JoJo McDuffie). Neatly tied together by opening and closing cuts that include Stevie Wonder on harmonica, because Ronson could swing it, Uptown Special is another nostalgic fantasy that provides light entertainment and provokes backtracking. ~ Andy Kellman
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Pop - Released January 25, 2019 | Columbia

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Pop - Released December 28, 2018 | Columbia

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Rock - Released March 13, 2006 | Rapster Records

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Pop - Released January 18, 2019 | Columbia

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Pop - Released June 29, 2015 | Columbia

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Electronic/Dance - Released November 8, 2009 | Elektra Records

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Electronic/Dance - Released August 29, 2003 | Atlantic Records UK

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Pop - Released July 3, 2015 | Columbia

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Pop - Released December 23, 2014 | Columbia

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Pop - Released May 24, 2019 | Columbia

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Pop - Released April 26, 2019 | Columbia