Categories :

Similar artists

Albums

HI-RES$14.99
CD$10.49

Alternative & Indie - Released May 8, 2020 | Heavenly Recordings

Hi-Res
As he continues to release albums, Mark Lanegan increasingly becomes a lone wolf, always wandering off to experiment with new things or aggressively change gear. After Blues Funeral in 2012, the old singer for Screaming Trees has reentered the solo game no longer content with his years among Queens Of The Stone Age or his (sublime) duos with Isobel Campbell. Straights Songs of Sorrow shows us again how kaleidoscopic his art can be. Here we are met with contemporary grunge, electro rock, austere blues, unusual folk and shamanic ballads. Led as always by his charismatic, baritone voice, his 2020 offering is, for the first time, entirely autobiographical. Fifteen songs inspired by his personal history as told in his memoir, Sing Backwards And Weep, released alongside the album. His youth in the state of Washington during the grunge tsunami, his drug addiction, death, but also hope and humour, all is there in this feast of intimate delights. “Writing the book, I didn’t get catharsis,” explains Lanegan “All I got was a Pandora’s box full of pain and misery. I went way in and remembered shit I’d put away 20 years ago. But I started writing these songs the minute I was done, and I realised there was a depth of emotion because they were all linked to memories from this book. It was a relief to suddenly go back to music. Then I realised that was the gift of the book: these songs.” Finally, Straight Songs of Sorrow merges the writing strengths of Mark Lanegan’s first solo albums like the brilliant Whiskey For The Holy Ghost (1994) with the upfront complexity of his more recent works. An intense fusion that is successful with the help of guests among the likes of his old partner Greg Dulli from Afghan Whigs, the Bad Seeds’ Warren Ellis, Led Zeppelin’s John Paul Jones, Portishead’s Adrian Utley and even Ed Harcourt. A fantastic rock’n’roll offering worthy of being experienced. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
CD$11.99

Alternative & Indie - Released August 2, 2004 | Beggars Banquet

CD$10.49

Alternative & Indie - Released August 24, 2018 | Heavenly Recordings

For their second album, which follows Black Pudding released in 2013, Mark Lanegan and Duke Garwood haven’t moved away from their dark, foggy and thick blues. Even the album cover of With Animals is sealed from the light and displays tortured, ghostly characters. With his deep Tom Waits-like voice, Lanegan leads a slow and heavy funeral march, coming to weigh on consciences as with Feast To Famine where he states that he’s “good for the damage". For this album, which was recorded in Los Angeles, Pasadena and Joshua Tree, the American and British artists aren’t here in a search of musical performance. What remains important is the weight and impact of the words; the effects of internal emotions. We have here twelve tracks that seem to merge with the twelve nocturnal hours, each one like a progression into the darkness and the different atmospheres of the night. We find a melancholic acoustic ballad with Upon Doing Something Wrong, psychedelic distortions on Scarlett and even a dance of maracas on Spaceman. It’s a dark journey that turns out to be much more pleasant than one might think. © Clara Bismuth/Qobuz
HI-RES$14.99
CD$12.99

Alternative & Indie - Released June 27, 1994 | Sub Pop Records

Hi-Res
Mark Lanegan's first solo album, 1990's The Winding Sheet, was a darker, quieter, and more emotionally troubling affair than what fans were accustomed to from his work as lead singer with the Screaming Trees. The follow-up album, 1994 's Whiskey for the Holy Ghost, used The Winding Sheet's sound and style as a starting point, with Lanegan and producer/instrumentalist Mike Johnson constructing resonant but low-key instrumental backdrops for the singer's tales of heartbreak, alcohol, and dashed hopes. While The Winding Sheet often sounded inspired but tentative, like the solo project from a member of an established band, Whiskey for the Holy Ghost speaks with a quiet but steely confidence of an artist emerging with his own distinct vision. The songs are more literate and better realized than on the debut, the arrangements are subtle and supportive (often eschewing electric guitars for keyboards and acoustic instruments), and Lanegan's voice, bathed in bourbon and nicotine, transforms the deep sorrow of the country blues (a clear inspiration for this music) into something new, compelling, and entirely his own. Whiskey for the Holy Ghost made it clear that Mark Lanegan had truly arrived as a solo artist, and it ranks alongside American Music Club's Everclear as one of the best "dark night of the soul" albums of the 1990s. © Mark Deming /TiVo
CD$10.49

Alternative & Indie - Released April 28, 2017 | Heavenly Recordings

Gargoyle, Mark Lanegan's fourth album under the moniker the Mark Lanegan Band, opens with a song called "Death's Head Tattoo," and given the singer's chronically gloomy outlook on the world around him, that title sounds like it could be the height of cliché in Lanegan's hands. But thanks to his intelligence as a songwriter and his gifts as a vocalist, even under the worst circumstances Lanegan would deliver something worth hearing, and "Death's Head Tattoo" turns out to be more perceptive than one might have feared. Similarly, Gargoyle turns out to be a more satisfying listen than the previous Mark Lanegan Band albums. In addition to his usual collaborator, producer and multi-instrumentalist Alain Johannes, most of the tracks also feature guitars, bass, and other instruments from Rob Marshall, guitarist with the band Exit Calm. Having Marshall on board has given most of these tracks a welcome dose of muscle and rock action, and if electronics still dominate the sonic horizons of Gargoyle, the results feel more organic, and Lanegan appears to be more invested in this material. "Beehive" is a testimony to the pleasures and perils of addiction, "Emperor" is a meditation on loneliness that could have been an outtake from Iggy Pop's Post Pop Depression (and features guest vocals from Iggy and Mark's mutual friend Josh Homme), "Drunk on Destruction" is a powerful fusion of six-string howl and drum loops, and "Old Swan" brings the album to a suitably epochal conclusion. Lanegan's vocals are in fine form throughout; quieter numbers such as "Sister" and "First Day of Winter" allow him to deliver more nuanced performances that show how well he makes use of the nooks and crannies of his instrument, and the album's best rockers are full of liberating power. At first glance, Gargoyle doesn't feel like an album full of surprises, but after the second or third spin, the fuller and bolder sound of the arrangements and production becomes clear, and it all serves Lanegan's talents in a way his last few Mark Lanegan Band albums have not. © Mark Deming /TiVo
CD$12.99

Rock - Released May 23, 2006 | Sub Pop Records

HI-RES$14.99
CD$12.99

Alternative & Indie - Released January 1, 2008 | Sub Pop Records

Hi-Res
HI-RES$14.99
CD$12.99

Rock - Released August 8, 2006 | Sub Pop Records

Hi-Res
By now, anyone who has heard one of Mark Lanegan's solo albums knows exactly what the others will sound like -- Lanegan's weathered, smoky voice intones tales of quiet desperation over echoing electric guitar arpeggios, folky acoustic guitar work, and the occasional piano, organ, or violin embellishment. This approach has resulted in a compelling body of work, often possessed of remarkable depth, but it's also become something of a stylistic straitjacket over the course of several albums. And that's the only major knock against the otherwise brilliant I'll Take Care of You, Lanegan's fourth solo album, which marks the first time it hasn't taken him four years to deliver a follow-up. Perhaps that's because there's no original material here -- I'll Take Care of You applies the drifting, elegiac qualities of its predecessors to a selection of well-chosen, mostly underexposed folk, country, and blues covers. It's a testament to Lanegan's interpretive skill that he's able to use his already well-established style so effectively yet again, as most of these versions range from stunning to merely excellent. His sources are widely varied: acclaimed but undervalued folk artists like Tim Hardin and Fred Neil, soul-blues singer Bobby Bland (the Brook Benton-penned title track), cult indie bands the Gun Club and the Leaving Trains, country superstar Buck Owens, and traditional folk songs best known through Dave Van Ronk and Doc Watson. Yet the uniformity of Lanegan's sound works in his favor, tying his disparate sources together and making them seem like the product of a unified worldview. Even on the more upbeat, major-key tunes, Lanegan's treatments make the singer's happiness sound wistful and fleeting, as though he's achieved a quiet peace and is already mourning its inevitable end. Moreover, he never overplays the darker dirges, and the restrained arrangements help ensure that his melancholy never seems forced. As good as they are, there are parts of every Lanegan album that float off into the ether; however, the material on I'll Take Care of You helps keep him tethered, actually improving on his signature sound by tightening it up. So, even if you think you've heard it all from Lanegan before -- and even if he'll have to open up his sound or risk diluting the qualities that make him compelling -- I'll Take Care of You really is one of his most affecting, accessible recordings, if not the most. © Steve Huey /TiVo
CD$0.99

Alternative & Indie - Released February 19, 2020 | Heavenly Recordings

CD$12.99

Alternative & Indie - Released October 5, 2009 | Sub Pop Records

With the Screaming Trees, Mark Lanegan is part of a dysfunctional family that can only pull its act together once in a while. As he's struggling to make the group work, he's taken away from his solo career, which has proven to be far more consistent than his band's. Scraps at Midnight, Lanegan's third solo effort (one arrives every four years or so), follows a similar path as his first two albums -- it's a haunted, low-key affair steeped in blues, folk and country. The rustic setting allows Lanegan to spin some captivating tales, all delivered in his powerful, throaty growl. Although it's similar to its predecessor, Scraps at Midnight is arguably his most accomplished -- it might just miss matching the excellence of Whiskey for the Holy Ghost, but with songs as uniformly strong and performances as passionate as these, it comes damn close. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
CD$12.99

Alternative & Indie - Released June 27, 1994 | Sub Pop Records

Mark Lanegan's first solo album, 1990's The Winding Sheet, was a darker, quieter, and more emotionally troubling affair than what fans were accustomed to from his work as lead singer with the Screaming Trees. The follow-up album, 1994 's Whiskey for the Holy Ghost, used The Winding Sheet's sound and style as a starting point, with Lanegan and producer/instrumentalist Mike Johnson constructing resonant but low-key instrumental backdrops for the singer's tales of heartbreak, alcohol, and dashed hopes. While The Winding Sheet often sounded inspired but tentative, like the solo project from a member of an established band, Whiskey for the Holy Ghost speaks with a quiet but steely confidence of an artist emerging with his own distinct vision. The songs are more literate and better realized than on the debut, the arrangements are subtle and supportive (often eschewing electric guitars for keyboards and acoustic instruments), and Lanegan's voice, bathed in bourbon and nicotine, transforms the deep sorrow of the country blues (a clear inspiration for this music) into something new, compelling, and entirely his own. Whiskey for the Holy Ghost made it clear that Mark Lanegan had truly arrived as a solo artist, and it ranks alongside American Music Club's Everclear as one of the best "dark night of the soul" albums of the 1990s. © Mark Deming /TiVo
CD$0.99

Alternative & Indie - Released March 23, 2020 | Heavenly Recordings

CD$3.99

Alternative & Indie - Released December 1, 2003 | Beggars Banquet

Ex-Screaming Trees frontman Mark Lanegan growls his way through "Methamphetamine Blues" like Small Change-era Tom Waits singing something off of Mule Variations. It's a great, sleazy opener to this EP of "Methamphetamine Blues, Extras & Oddities" from the Mark Lanegan Band's upcoming full-length, Here Comes That Weird Chill. Boasting musical assistance from members of Ween, Afghan Whigs, and Masters of Reality, Lanegan and friends cover every angle of the lo-fi spectrum, from the psychedelic soul of "Message to Mine" to the Nick Cave-like balladry of "Lexington Slow Down." These are not simply four-track renderings of soon to be fleshed-out studio tracks or dull covers -- Captain Beefheart's "Clear Spot" -- they're gritty snapshots of a tenacious songwriter in love with the dark. The sound is a bit muddy throughout and the vocals are often treated excessively, but considering the "extras" tag these are minor gripes, especially when assaulted by the machine gun imagery that snakes its way through "Skeletal History." As far as sneak peaks go, the Here Comes That Weird Chill EP serves as a tantalizing primer. © James Christopher Monger /TiVo
CD$12.99

Alternative & Indie - Released January 1, 2008 | Sub Pop Records

Removing himself for a moment from the rowdy world of grunge, Screaming Trees singer Mark Lanegan put his best solo foot forward with a set of acoustic dirges. His menacing voice haunts each track as the blues come to life throughout the album. Capturing the melancholy mentality of the Pacific Northwest, his words descend like raindrops upon deep puddles of mud. The undeniable beauty of a song such as "Ugly Sunday" obviously comes from reveling in the mire, something that Lanegan has been all too familiar with as a recovering addict. He finds a kindred spirit in Kurt Cobain as the two join forces to present "Down in the Dark." And his version of Leadbelly's "Where Did You Sleep Last Night" is as charged as ever with pent-up frustration and jealousy. An emotional journey through the pains of life, The Winding Sheet is an album that accurately expresses the candid underbelly of the grunge aesthetic. © Robert Gabriel /TiVo
CD$12.99

Rock - Released August 8, 2006 | Sub Pop Records

CD$12.99

Rock - Released January 1, 2015 | Vagrant Records

Beginning with Mark Lanegan's cover of Lead Belly's "Where Did You Sleep Last Night" on The Winding Sheet, his 1990 solo debut album, he's revealed himself to be a fine interpretive singer. Until now, he's only issued one previous record of covers, 1999's wonderful I'll Take Care of You. On Imitations, Lanegan offers contemporary songs, standards, and obscure numbers that, according to him, reveal the effect his parents' record collection had on him. The arrangements are unique, song to song. John Barry's "You Only Live Twice" (Nancy Sinatra) is only orchestrated by a pair of acoustic guitars; the singer's voice entering the lyric's dangerous flow becomes a hazy nocturnal dream. "Pretty Colors" (Frank Sinatra) features tremoloed electric guitars, harpsichord, vibes, percussion, and bass. They frame Lanegan's world-weary, restrained, but deftly effective emotive croon. Three songs are closely associated with Andy Williams who, as revealed in his interpretations, is a complex figure -- akin to that of Roy Orbison in David Lynch's iconography: Neil Sedaka's "Solitaire" is read through the lens of Ennio Morricone's cinematic spaghetti western scores, yet it's tempered, brought into emotional view by violin and cello framing Lanegan's declamatory voice. His delivery of Carl Belew's "Lonely Street" is taken beyond the pale of the heart's borderlands with bittersweet reverie, sorrow, and acceptance. Andrew Joslyn's multi-tracked violins add an ethereal dimension to the standard rock instrumentation. Johnny Mercer and Jacques Prevert's "Autumn Leaves" finds Billy Stover's piano leading the band, with the chart kissed by strings. Lanegan leans in and captures the otherworldliness and impossibility of the romance in the lyric -- Williams did it with so much grace that the song's tragedy was often overlooked, but Lanegan heard the soft yet crushing blow in Williams' voice, and delivers it in his own. The contemporary numbers are equally creative. "Flatlands," by Chelsea Wolfe, uses acoustic guitars, percussion, bass, and a three-piece string section. It feels earth-moving in the grain of Lanegan's instrument. Nick Cave's "Brompton Oratory," adorned with horns, gives the track a classy jazz tinge (think of a light, sophisticated Gerald Wilson chart), yet could be played by a Salvation Army band. The conviction in Lanegan's delivery is so inside the lyric, it convincingly equates the love and loss in the gospels with that of this spurned lover's grief and longing. "She's Gone" (not the Hall & Oates tune as has been reported, but a mid-'60s bluegrass waltz by Clarence White and Jan Paxton) wears its Nashville-cum-California swirl beautifully with Mark Hoyt's backing harmony vocal. On Greg Dulli's "Deepest Shade," Lanegan reveals the songwriter's Leonard Cohen worship nakedly Further, he dresses John Cale's "I'm Not the Loving Kind" in the pomp of '70s Elvis and the breezy vulnerability of Dusty Springfield simultaneously! Imitations is a fine collection that reveals the depth of the songs through the openness and considerable skill of the singer. © Thom Jurek /TiVo
CD$8.99

Hard Rock - Released January 20, 2015 | Ipecac Recordings

CD$8.99

Rock - Released August 21, 2015 | Ipecac Recordings

CD$4.99

Alternative & Indie - Released September 29, 2017 | Heavenly Recordings

CD$0.99

Alternative & Indie - Released April 22, 2020 | Heavenly Recordings

Artist

Mark Lanegan in the magazine
  • Evening stroll with animals...
    Evening stroll with animals... For their second album, which follows Black Pudding released in 2013, Mark Lanegan and Duke Garwood haven’t moved away from their dark, foggy and thick blues.