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Rock - Released December 1, 2017 | Rhino

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Rock - Released November 23, 2018 | Parlophone UK

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Rock - Released March 2, 1998 | Parlophone UK

At the conclusion of the Script for a Jester's Tear tour, Marillion decided to give drummer Mick Pointer his marching orders, replacing him momentarily with Camel's Andy Ward and later by American studio whiz Jonathan Mover. Mover's recruitment proved to be short-lived, as Fish ushered in Steve Hackett's drummer/percussionist, Ian Mosley, whose spot-on drumming was the perfect foil for Marillion's meticulous musicianship. With Mosley, the band set out to record its sophomore effort. The first track to emerge from the Fugazi sessions would be "Punch and Judy" (which EMI released as the album's first single). In hindsight, this wasn't a smart move -- the single quickly vanished into chart oblivion. As the sessions turned into a grueling and at times exasperating multi-studio juggling act (ten different studios were used for the tracking/mixing of the record), Fugazi proved to be a somewhat disjointed follow-up to the classic Script for a Jester's Tear. Despite its superlative arrangements, the album lacked its predecessor's cohesion and focus, but all was not lost: Buried in the album's murky mix are three Marillion classics. "Assassing," "Incubus," and especially the album's title track showcase the band at its melodramatic best. The cryptic "Fugazi" was a highlight of the band's live set for many years to follow. [In 1998, EMI issued a remastered version of Fugazi featuring a bonus disc full of oddities and demos, including "Three Boats Down From the Candy," a 12" version of "Cinderella Search," and four of the album's original demos. The remastered version goes a long way toward restoring the album's original sonic aesthetic (lost somewhere along the way in initial vinyl and CD pressings).] ~ John Franck
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Rock - Released June 12, 1987 | Parlophone UK

Written and conceived during a period of inner-band turmoil, Clutching at Straws would prove to be Fish's swan song, and perhaps Marillion's most unheralded masterpiece. Teaming up once again with producer Chris Kimsey, Clutching at Straws showcases some of the band's most satisfying compositions, including the magnificent "Warm Wet Circles" and "That Time of the Night (The Short Straw)." Bookended by Fish's disgust with not only himself, "Torch Song," but also with the burgeoning neo-Nazi uprising in Europe, "White Russian," the great Scot delivers an inspired condemnation. The commercial pomp and circumstance of "Incommunicado" also gives way to a self-parodying confessional inspired by Fish's inability to see himself as a bona fide rock star and celebrity ("I want to do adverts for American Express cards, talk shows on prime time T.V."). Tour opener "Slainte Mhath" is simple and elegant, building to its dramatic crescendo only to be upstaged by "Sugar Mice" -- quite simply, one of Marillion's best commercial singles ever. The album's stunning closer, "The Last Straw," is Fish's self-realization that yes, the band is not only over, but that in his mind, it's null and void ("and if you ever come across us, don't give us your sympathy"). Steve Rothery's blinding guitar solo brings the whole thing down to a crashing finish (prophetically, announcing his arrival as the band's true musical instigator on subsequent Fish-less records). ~ John Franck
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Rock - Released November 23, 2018 | Parlophone UK

Written and conceived during a period of inner-band turmoil, Clutching at Straws would prove to be Fish's swan song, and perhaps Marillion's most unheralded masterpiece. Teaming up once again with producer Chris Kimsey, Clutching at Straws showcases some of the band's most satisfying compositions, including the magnificent "Warm Wet Circles" and "That Time of the Night (The Short Straw)." Bookended by Fish's disgust with not only himself, "Torch Song," but also with the burgeoning neo-Nazi uprising in Europe, "White Russian," the great Scot delivers an inspired condemnation. The commercial pomp and circumstance of "Incommunicado" also gives way to a self-parodying confessional inspired by Fish's inability to see himself as a bona fide rock star and celebrity ("I want to do adverts for American Express cards, talk shows on prime time T.V."). Tour opener "Slainte Mhath" is simple and elegant, building to its dramatic crescendo only to be upstaged by "Sugar Mice" -- quite simply, one of Marillion's best commercial singles ever. The album's stunning closer, "The Last Straw," is Fish's self-realization that yes, the band is not only over, but that in his mind, it's null and void ("and if you ever come across us, don't give us your sympathy"). Steve Rothery's blinding guitar solo brings the whole thing down to a crashing finish (prophetically, announcing his arrival as the band's true musical instigator on subsequent Fish-less records). ~ John Franck
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Rock - Released July 21, 2017 | Rhino

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Rock - Released September 29, 1997 | Parlophone UK

After Fish's departure, Marillion teetered on the brink of collapse: The frontman's distinct voice and poetic prose made him the defining member of the band. One can only imagine how record executives held their collective breath as Steve Hogarth was brought in to take the reins. His first outing with band, 1989's Season's End, removed all doubts about the band's future. Hogarth's unique, expressive voice fit Marillion perfectly; on the full-throttle rock assault of "The Uninvited Guest" or the emotional "After You," Hogarth's singularity is unmistakable. The heartfelt "Easter," with its imaginative electric-acoustic arrangement, is another showcase for Hogarth's talents. Marillion's ability to write music whose ideals live and breathe in the listener continues on Seasons End, particularly on the inspiring "Holloway Girl," which dissects the injustice of incarcerating mentally ill female inmates (at England's Holloway Prison) instead of placing them in appropriate psychiatric facilities. The beautiful "Easter" is the band's plea for peace in Ireland, while "The King of Sunset Town" has its lyrical roots in the massacre at Tiananmen Square. Hogarth's flexible range and beautiful phrasing shine on the entire album. In 1999 Marillion released a remastered version of Seasons End, including a bonus disc of outtakes and alternate versions as well as the previously unreleased "The Bell in the Sea" and "The Release." Both are strong tracks and are welcome additions to the Marillion catalog. While 1995's Afraid of Sunlight is the peak of Marillion's growing, impressive body of work, Season's End shouldn't be missed either. ~ Jeri Montesano
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Rock - Released September 29, 1997 | Parlophone UK

At the time, Marillion's remarkable, full-fledged 1983 debut Script for a Jester's Tear was considered an odd bird: replete with Peter Gabriel face paint and lengthy, technical compositions, Marillion ushered in a new generation of prog rock that bound them forever to the heroics of early day Genesis. Intricate, complex, and theatrical almost to a fault, Script for a Jester's Tear remains the band's best and sets the bar for their later work. Filled with extraordinary songs that remained staples in the band's live gigs, the album begins with the poignant title track, on which Fish leads his band of merry men on a brokenhearted tour de force that culminates with the singer decrying that "…the game is over." "He Knows You Know,," a song sprinkled with drug paranoia and guilt; as the song veers to its chorus, Fish announces, "Fast feed, crystal fever, swarming through a fractured mind." If "The Web" hints at a grain of commercialism, "Garden Party" is a joyous anthem that showcases Marillion at the peak of its powers. Bogged down by some hilariously over-the-top British poetry, "Chelsea Monday" may be one of the album's lesser moments (if there are any), but the magical "Forgotten Sons" concludes the opus magnificently. Luckily for Marillion fans, EMI released a remastered version of Script with two different versions of "Market Square Heroes," "Three Boats Down from the Candy," "Grendel," "Chelsea Monday," the demo of "He Knows You Know," and an alternate track titled "Charting the Single." A vital piece for any Marillion head and an essential work for any self-respecting first- or second-generation prog rock fan. ~ John Franck
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Rock - Released November 14, 2008 | Parlophone UK

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Rock - Released March 9, 2018 | Rhino

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Rock - Released June 7, 2019 | Rhino

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Rock - Released May 31, 2010 | Parlophone UK

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Rock - Released November 28, 1988 | Parlophone UK

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Rock - Released June 8, 1992 | Parlophone UK

Few bands' careers are as clearly divided into two separate eras as Marillion, whose four mid-'80s albums with exuberant vocalist Fish briefly resurrected progressive rock in all its extravagance, only to be followed by an even longer stretch of years and albums with the comparatively mainstream Steve Hogarth fronting the band in a generally more consumer-friendly, adult-oriented rock guise. Without even attempting to enter into a lengthy discussion over each singer's merits, let it be said that a continuous listen through Six of One, Half-Dozen of the Other is tantamount to a wild ride through the mind of a band suffering from multiple-personality disorder -- of which Fish, admittedly, owns nine out of ten. The disc opens with the two most accomplished radio entries from each of the group's two phases, namely the beautiful "Cover My Eyes (Pain & Heaven)" from the second phase and the captivating "Kayleigh from the first. But from here on out, similarly melodic gems like "Dry Land" and "No One Can" begin to rub shoulders uneasily with such preposterous prog rock epics as "Assassing" and "Garden Party." Ironically, it is the Fish-era material that sounds most uniform -- if only for its outlandish diversity -- when compared to the often clumsy experiments (see the ill-advised pop metal of "Hooks in You" and "Uninvited Guest") of the band's second incarnation. A less democratic but gentler approach would have been to sequence these tracks in chronological order, but truth be told, Marillion is the kind of band that simply defies greatest-hits packages. Dedicated progressive rock fans would be better suited to just shell out for the recently remastered and repackaged original albums. ~ Eduardo Rivadavia
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Rock - Released March 2, 1998 | Parlophone UK

Faced with flagging sales on their first post-Fish release Season's End, progressive rockers Marillion paired themselves with pop producer Christopher Neil for 1991's Holidays in Eden. It wasn't exactly a move that paid either commercial or artistic dividends, as the results are so diluted and bland that one can only hope this was a desperate attempt to appease their label. There were several singles that charted in the U.K., but they could have been performed by anyone or, worse, in the case of the ringing guitars on "Cover My Eyes," it sounds as though they want to reinvent themselves as U2. It's a record that will surely disappoint fans of their more progressive work and, lacking a distinctive personality, hardly elicit excitement from newcomers. ~ Tom Demalon
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Rock - Released October 2, 2009 | earMUSIC

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Rock - Released February 7, 1994 | Parlophone UK

Rebounding from the inconsistent Holidays in Eden, Marillion retreated to the studio for 15 months to write and record the concept album Brave. Telling the story of an abused girl wandering on Severn Bridge, the album is a solid mix of symphonic tracks with a pronounced rock edge. A band known for trilogies, the final set of "The Great Escape," "The Last of You," and "Falling From the Moon" form one of the most dynamic showcases for vocalist Steve Hogarth and guitarist Steve Rothery. Brave remains the most complex Marillion release to date, with layers and layers of sound. A full-length movie of Brave, directed by Richard Stanley, was released in Europe in conjunction with the album. ~ Dale Jensen
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Rock - Released June 26, 1995 | Parlophone UK

Afraid of sunlight was Marillion's first real progressive album since Fish had left the band. While it does not rank as high as classics like Script for a Jester's Tear or Fugazi, it still has some very strong moments. "Cannibal Surf Babe" is a tribute to the '60s (sort of). It starts off like the Beach Boys' "California Girls" before turning into the nightmarish tale of a cannibal woman! But the best moments are in the second half of the album, with tracks such as "Out of This World," "Afraid of Sunlight," and "King." As usual with Marillion, the keyboards stand out the most. There are some very beautiful melodic moments and perhaps a better mix between calm and agressive melodies than on previous albums made with Steve Hogarth. ~ Alex S. Garcia
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Rock - Released December 5, 2016 | Sanctuary Records

Following the first four Marillion albums (and vocalist Fish's departure), the band released La Gazza Ladra, a live album which included one CD of tracks from three of the albums, and one CD containing a complete run-through of the concept album Misplaced Childhood. Four albums after the arrival of Steve Hogarth, Made Again has one disc that contains a complete live Brave concert, and another of miscellaneous tracks from the band's 14-year career. Unfortunately, the atmospheric Brave comes across with a muddled sound, and the selection of other tracks sound far better in their studio forms. ~ Dale Jensen
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Rock - Released June 22, 2009 | Parlophone UK