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Rock - Released January 1, 2013 | Island

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography - Pitchfork: Best New Reissue
After a lengthy absence, Faithfull resurfaced on this 1979 album, which took the edgy and brittle sound of punk rock and gave it a shot of studio-smooth dance rock. Faithfull's whiskey-worn vocals perfectly match the bitter and biting "Why'd Ya Do It" and revitalize John Lennon's "Working Class Hero." © John Floyd /TiVo
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Pop - Released August 27, 2021 | BMG Rights Management (UK) Ltd

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Pop/Rock - Released April 30, 2021 | BMG Rights Mgmt France SARL

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The works of Lord Byron, John Keats, Thomas Hood, Percy Bysshe Shelley, William Wordsworth and Alfred Tennyson are not just for tortured young men in frock coats, wandering alone across rainy hills. Far from it: a 74 year-old woman, battered by excess, illness, and a full life, has also appropriated this feverish 18th-century poetry. Marianne Faithfull, weighed down by the experience of surviving Covid, brings great intensity to her recitation of these verses, and makes them very much her own. She has called on the reliable Warren Ellis, a former Bad Seed, to cut a musical backcloth which offers both restraint and grandiloquence. Ghostly synths and heavy strings wrap around Dame Marianne's craggy vocals. These songs are wreathed in a dreamy twilight that stops just short of the macabre; the landscapes roll by, and the poetry of these past greats steps out into our troubled present. Nick Cave brings piano and percussion to most of the tracks, and Vincent Segal his cello. Even Brian Eno comes in to play clarinet on The Bridge of Sighs. The result is a gorgeous backdrop for a magnificent album, and one which confirms that Marianne Faithfull, a fixture of the rock scene since the early 60s, is still a great and unique artist. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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Rock - Released November 2, 2018 | BMG Rights Mgmt France SARL

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Rock - Released June 24, 2002 | Demon

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Pop - Released January 1, 1995 | Island Records (The Island Def Jam Music Group / Universal Music)

For her first studio album comprised of mostly original material in over a decade, Faithfull enlisted noted composer Angelo Badalamenti (who collaborated with David Lynch for the Twin Peaks TV soundtrack) to write music for her lyrics and produce. Faithfull is still in rippingly fine voice, and her words still penetrate. But while Badalamenti's densely orchestral arrangements can be effectively noirish, they can also create an inappropriately cold and detached ambience, despite standout tracks like "Flaming September" and "She." © Richie Unterberger /TiVo
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Rock - Released January 1, 1990 | Universal-Island Records Ltd.

Fully established as a dramatic, innovative singer with astonishing appeal and energy thanks to her string of excellent '80s releases, Faithfull concluded her renaissance decade with Blazing Away, an excellent live album recorded in New York's St. Anne's Cathedral. The crackerjack backing band deserves note in and of itself, including members ranging from the Band's Garth Hudson to Dr. John, plus regular collaborators Marc Ribot, Fernando Saunders, and her key partner Barry Reynolds. Faithfull and the players fit hand in glove track for track, with the emphasis on subtler arrangements and performances suiting the hushed, striking atmosphere of the performance. When the band shows its muscle, as with the snarling strut of "Guilt," there's no question of this being anything like easy listening. In general, though, the sense of cabaret meets modern nightclub dominates, with Faithfull's singing capturing the cracking tug of her vocals just so. The selection of songs ranges from the intriguingly obscure to the familiar enough -- "As Tears Go By" and "Broken English" take unsurprising bows, as does a lengthy brood on "Sister Morphine," "She Moved Through the Fair," and a commanding rip through the harrowing "Why'd Ya Do It?" There are two new numbers as well. The title track is the one song recorded in studio, with Reynolds and Saunders, plus a number of other musicians; it's got a nice steel guitar twang to it, and Faithfull tries for the high lonesome sound in her own wonderful way. Other flat-out highlights include a grand take on "Times Square" and a slow crawl through "Working Class Hero" that seethes with fire, both from the musicians and Faithfull. © Ned Raggett /TiVo
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Rock - Released January 1, 1998 | Island Records (The Island Def Jam Music Group / Universal Music)

Because more than half of the 35 songs on this two-disc retrospective of Marianne Faithfull's 1979-95 output come from her three great albums -- Broken English, Dangerous Acquaintances, and Strange Weather -- or are previously unreleased outtakes or B-sides from them, A Perfect Stranger: The Island Anthology makes a fine primer to Faithfull's often challenging, always mesmerizing (or would that be always challenging, often mesmerizing?) music. "Ballad of the Soldier's Wife," her solid contribution to 1985's Lost in the Stars: The Music of Kurt Weill, is also included, giving Faithfull's hauntingly tragic voice the resonance and attention it demands. Weill and Faithfull seem made for each other, as the bulk of the second disc (comprised of songs from her 1990 live album and the underachieving A Secret Life, as well as the career-capping Strange Weather) makes clear. But there's also a strain to some of these tracks, as if Faithfull's aesthetic wandering eventually will bring her to that elusive cabaret of her dreams. On her best recordings, it indeed sounds like she's home. © Michael Gallucci /TiVo
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Alternative & Indie - Released November 10, 2008 | naïve

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Rock - Released January 1, 1964 | ABKCO (US)

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Rock - Released November 2, 2018 | BMG Rights Mgmt France SARL

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Marianne Faithfull was just 18 years old when she scored a hit in England and America with "As Tears Go By" in 1964. In 2018, a 71-year-old Faithfull re-recorded the song for her album Negative Capability, and the differences between the two versions speak volumes about the artist she is in the 2010s. The performance on Negative Capability comes from a vocalist who has learned a lot more about love, heartache, and the good and bad places that fate can take you than the 18-year-old ever imagined she could know. It's more than a little rueful, but also full of hard-won wisdom, and the rough edges of her voice only add to the resonance of the performance. Faithfull doubles down on the impact of "As Tears Go By" with "In My Own Particular Way," as she speaks plainly of her need for love and acceptance, both because of and in spite of the experiences of seven decades. Aging and loss aren't necessarily the themes of Negative Capability, but they lurk somewhere in the shadows of nearly every tune here, and the cracks in the surface of Faithfull's instrument generally add more than they take away from her vocals, while her phrasing and dramatic sense are as keen as they've ever been. Warren Ellis of the Dirty Three and Nick Cave & the Bad Seeds produced Negative Capability in tandem with Head and Rob Ellis, as well as performing on most of the tracks, and the weary but insistent cry of his violin is an ideal match for Faithfull's voice, at once complementing the singing and lending it empathetic support. The originals are full of thoughtful observation and emotions that balance somewhere between hope and disappointment, and she puts a spin on classics by Bob Dylan ("It's All Over Now, Baby Blue") and the Pretty Things ("The Loneliest Person," included on the deluxe edition) that makes them an ideal fit for this album. In 1964, Marianne Faithfull was a budding talent with genuine promise, and in the decades since, she's matured into a strikingly effective performer and a songwriter with a clear, brave voice. Negative Capability is a testament to her journey and what it has taught her, and it reminds us she's still a talent capable of drawing our attention. © Mark Deming /TiVo
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Rock - Released January 1, 1983 | Island Records (The Island Def Jam Music Group / Universal Music)

Faithfull pegged her comeback to a brutal survivalist persona, but by this fourth album of her second career, she had mellowed at least to the extent of constructing flowing song structures with her collaborators, Barry Reynolds and Wally Badarou, that eased the bitterness still found in many of her lyrics. A Child's Adventure is thus more listenable, but less compelling, than her other albums of the period. © William Ruhlmann /TiVo
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Pop - Released April 12, 1999 | BMG Rights Management (UK) Ltd

Following a pair of albums that delved into cabaret and one which paired her with Angelo Badalamenti (an affair that yielded mixed results), the Grande dame of rock & roll returned with her most striking effort in a while. Faithfull, an amazing interpreter of others' material, co-wrote most of the songs here, including the haunting title track. In fact, haunting is the best way to describe the first several cuts. "Incarceration of a Flower Child," written by Roger Waters, is emotionally wrenching, and "File It Under Fun From the Past" has an air of wistful resignation. Some of the material wavers a bit ("Marathon Kiss," the somewhat overly dramatic, spoke word "After the Ceasefire"), but Faithfull is never anything less than riveting. For long-time fans, Vagabond Ways is a worthy addition to her body of work. For newcomers, it's a suitable introduction to one of the true icons of rock history and one who has become more relevant with age. © Tom Demalon /TiVo
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Pop - Released August 23, 1994 | Island Records (The Island Def Jam Music Group / Universal Music)

This best-of basically covers the years 1979 to 1994, though it reaches back to 1964 for Marianne Faithfull's first recording and first hit, "As Tears Go By," and includes "She," slated for the upcoming 1995 album A Secret Life. Five of the 11 songs are drawn from Faithfull's strongest album, 1979's Broken English, including the bitter title track and "Why'd Ya Do It." Otherwise, compiler Chris Blackwell makes little attempt to present a balance among Faithfull's recordings -- there is nothing at all from Dangerous Acquaintances or A Child's Adventure, and only one track each from Strange Weather and Blazing Away. But there is a good newly recorded cover of Patti Smith's "Ghost Dance" co-produced by Keith Richards and featuring other members of the Rolling Stones, and Blackwell rescues Faithfull's rendition of the title theme for the movie Trouble in Mind from the soundtrack album. It adds up to an excellent compilation that highlights Faithfull's strengths as a singer. © William Ruhlmann /TiVo
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Classical - Released August 16, 1996 | RCA Victor

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Rock - Released February 1, 1979 | Universal-Island Records Ltd.

After a lengthy absence, Faithfull resurfaced on this 1979 album, which took the edgy and brittle sound of punk rock and gave it a shot of studio-smooth dance rock. Faithfull's whiskey-worn vocals perfectly match the bitter and biting "Why'd Ya Do It" and revitalize John Lennon's "Working Class Hero." © John Floyd /TiVo
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Pop - Released September 14, 2018 | BMG Rights Mgmt France SARL

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Classical - Released August 1, 2004 | RCA Red Seal

If you're looking for the angelic Marianne Faithfull of As Tears Go By, or the angry diva of Broken English, or the lusher but piercingly acute imagery of her work with Angelo Badalamenti, you will not find it here. What you will find, though, is a fully orchestrated work that she has been selling out the house with in Europe -- a parable of commerce called The Seven Deadly Sins, with the Vienna Radio Orchestra and Dennis Russell Davies conducting. These are the songs of Kurt Weill, composer, and Bertolt Brecht, lyricist. This work, it would seem, is a perfect match of voice timbre and sound wished for by the composer. The husky and weary voiced Faithfull does these songs as they were intended to be done, her voice a beautiful match in tone and color. It is the heavy and somber tone of the music that blends so perfectly with her voice here. Weill's music tends toward a formality and somberness that shadows the concerns of the songs. Here Brecht's lyrics tell the moribund story of a girl placed on a tour by her family to earn money for their luxury; her voice reflects the weariness that becomes the ideal vehicle for her travails and lacerations. According to the tabloids, if they are to be believed, Marianne has spent her life researching this work. She displays that rare intelligence that allows all "misfortunes" to be converted to her benefit. There is a detachment that allows one to be intimately involved with, but not consumed by this type of work. This is her best work in quite some time. She deserves all the accolades that come her way as a serious singer who can pull off the piece. A wonderful disc from one whose live presence we must count as miraculous considering what she has lived through. © TiVo
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Rock - Released January 1, 1987 | Universal-Island Records Ltd.

Faithfull's 1987 release recast her as a nicotine-stained chanteuse, approaching such standards as "Boulevard of Broken Dreams" and "Penthouse Serenade" with a ravaged, world-weary demeanor that recalls the latter-day recordings of Billie Holiday. She also tackles some blues and jazz material and turns "As Tears Go By" into the gut-wrenching torch ballad neither the Stones nor Faithfull could ever have done in the '60s. A dark, challenging masterpiece. © John Floyd /TiVo
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Alternative & Indie - Released January 1, 2011 | naïve

Produced by long-term collaborator Hal Willner, Marianne Faithfull's 19th studio album, Horses and High Heels, sees the '60s icon revisit eight classic songs from her heyday on her second consecutive covers-heavy album, following 2009's Easy Come Easy Go. Its 13 tracks include reworkings of the Shangri-Las' "Past, Present and Future," Lesley Duncan's "Love Song," and Dusty Springfield's "Goin' Back," alongside several new compositions ("Why Did We Have to Part," "The Old House") and guest appearances from Lou Reed, Dr. John and MC5's Wayne Kramer. © Jon O'Brien /TiVo

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Marianne Faithfull in the magazine