Your basket is empty

Categories :

Similar artists

Albums

From
HI-RES$17.99
CD$11.99

Classical - Released August 24, 2010 | PentaTone

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Hi-Res Audio
From
HI-RES$17.99
CD$11.99

Classical - Released January 1, 2004 | PentaTone

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Hi-Res Audio
From
HI-RES$17.99
CD$11.99

Classical - Released January 1, 2003 | PentaTone

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Hi-Res Audio
From
HI-RES$17.99
CD$11.99

Classical - Released March 6, 2012 | PentaTone

Hi-Res Distinctions Hi-Res Audio
The late piano sonatas of Ludwig van Beethoven are among his most profoundly moving and satisfying works, and something worthwhile usually can be derived from most renditions, even average performances that don't necessarily have the best sound quality. However, in the case of a sensitive artist performing with depth of feeling and brilliant technique, and being recorded with the best possible audio reproduction, the results can be quite impressive. PentaTone's hybrid SACD of the piano sonatas, Opp. 109, 110, and 111 is an excellent presentation of Mari Kodama's marvelous interpretations of these masterpieces, and one can scarcely ask for a better recording in terms of the music and sound quality. Not only does Kodama apply a keen intellect and mature emotion to her playing, and demonstrate a spectacular technique, she actually gets the music to sound precisely as written. All of Beethoven's rhythmic oddities and unexpected syncopations work, and Kodama's meticulous sense of the beat keeps them buoyant and surprising because a steady pulse is always evident. She never obscures Beethoven's counterpoint, even if to do so would make better dramatic sense, and the clarity of her articulation and phrasing makes it possible to hear everything, including the awkward voice leading in the fugues. Yet under it all is an expressive coherence that makes each sonata feel whole and meaningfully connected to the larger body of Beethoven's keyboard works. This is visionary music, and Kodama perceives and conveys everything Beethoven intended. Highly recommended. © TiVo
From
HI-RES$17.99
CD$11.99

Classical - Released January 1, 2008 | PentaTone

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Hi-Res Audio
Born in Osaka, raised in Paris, educated at the Conservatoire National in Paris, and a student of Tatiana Nikolayeva and Alfred Brendel, Mari Kodama certainly has a distinctive pedigree. And with this, her fourth disc in a planned cycle of all Beethoven's sonatas, Kodama makes her bid to compete with her illustrious teachers. But while one cannot fault her polished technique or emotional playing, Kodama's Beethoven is not yet ready to join benchmark recordings by Schnabel, Kempff, Brendel, and others on the top shelf. Kodama's chosen repertoire is taken from the earliest of Beethoven's published sonatas, the three from Opus 2, but she plays them with an interpretive weight more appropriate to the more substantial later sonatas. The opening F minor Sonata has the relentless strength of the Tempest Sonata in its closing Prestissimo, the central A major Sonata has the unflagging intensity of the Appassionata Sonata in its central Largo, and the closing C major Sonata has the emotional weight of the Waldstein Sonata, especially in its ecstatic conclusion. These are fine qualities on the surface, but the relatively light content of the early sonatas does not yield them naturally, and Kodama appears to be reaching to create weight and solemnity where elegance and wit might be more appropriate. Super audio digital sound puts Kodama and her Steinway in the room with the listener. © TiVo
From
HI-RES$15.49
CD$11.99

Classical - Released October 11, 2019 | Berlin Classics

Hi-Res Distinctions 5 Sterne Fono Forum Klassik
Together with the Berlin-based Deutsches Symphonie-Orchester (DSO) Mari Kodama and her husband Kent Nagano have now completed the recording of all of Beethoven's piano concertos by jumping, as it were, back in time twice: the last element of this recording series that has spanned more than 13 years was Beethoven's concerto "number nought" (WoO 4) – personally edited by Mari Kodama from the autograph score. The original manuscript of this piano concerto is kept at the State Library in Berlin. This is not a completed score, because there is no orchestration. That said, Beethoven annotated the short score, especially in the first two movements, with indications as to which instrument was to play which part. The orchestra score which is available today was written in the early twentieth century based on those annotations. The only problem is: "Today, armed with the knowledge we now have acquired about the young Beethoven, we would perform this concerto quite differently in places," explain Mari Kodama and Kent Nagano in unison. They therefore present a very personal adaptation that emerged during rehearsal with the orchestra and at the recording sessions, and which reflects Kodama's and Nagano's individual image of Beethoven. They aim to make audible the exuberant freshness and urgent sense of awakening in the young, almost childlike Beethoven's writing shortly before his artistic powers were to burst forth, the joie de vivre and vital energy in a style that owes something to the playfulness of both Haydn and Mozart. That is Mari Kodama's intention, and she plays it in precisely such a versatile manner. Combined with the classical canon of the piano concertos nos. 1–5, the resulting comprehensive edition is complemented by the Triple Concerto for piano, violin and cello op. 56, the Rondo WoO 6 and the Eroica Variations op. 35, offering insight into the artist's longstanding involvement with her musical companion Ludwig van Beethoven. And the recordings of his works seem to lead the listener through the composer's life. "If you play all of them, it is like accompanying Beethoven on a journey through his life," explains Mari Kodama, and Kent Nagano adds: "You acknowledge the musical genius and at the same time you recognise the development of European music, because Beethoven was undoubtedly its pioneer." He led the way in changing the structure, form and harmony of music, just as there was an equally radical shift in the world around him; after the French Revolution society and business and the incipient industrial revolution began to alter the way people lived. "He is and remains an optimist, someone who can do no other than believe in what he wishes to communicate to us through his music," explains Kodama. She says this helps her. The fact that she herself is an optimist can partly be attributed to Beethoven. Kodama, Nagano and the DSO – one might imagine them almost as a trio where all the musicians have blind faith in each other and are therefore able to produce a degree of musical intensity that brings the young Beethoven back to life. © Berlin Classics
From
HI-RES$17.99
CD$11.99

Classical - Released January 1, 2003 | PentaTone

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Hi-Res Audio
From
HI-RES$17.99
CD$11.99

Classical - Released January 1, 2006 | PentaTone

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Hi-Res Audio
From
HI-RES$35.96
CD$23.96

Classical - Released November 6, 2012 | PentaTone

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Hi-Res Audio
This double-CD set is part of a leisurely complete cycle of Beethoven sonatas released by Japanese pianist Mari Kodama on the Dutch audiophile label PentaTone; the cycle was begun in 2003, and this group of sonatas was released in 2012, with more still to come. It's an odd grouping; almost every Beethoven sonata release, and plenty of Beethoven releases in other genres, mixes the big thundering works with the quieter pastoral or humorous ones. Here, Kodama puts six sonatas that are essentially of the latter type together. That doesn't exactly play to the strengths of her style, which has been compared with Angela Hewitt's, but might more accurately be likened to that of Dame Myra Hess. Kodama is very precise, quite graceful, minimal in the spread of her dynamic range, but making up for that in her ability to pick out very fine shades of articulation. "Polished in the best way" would be a possible description for her playing, but it is not without surprises. You just have to keep yourself alert for them. The strongest performance here is that of the curious Piano Sonata No. 22 in F major, Op. 54, a piece shot through with quirky humor that Kodama stays absolutely on top of. There are many nice details in the other pieces, but a double CD of the extreme restraint of Kodama's playing may make you wish for a bit of pandemonium. On the other hand, it may not, and really nobody else has turned Beethoven into a set of glass globes quite like this unusual player, whose sound is admirably complemented by the engineering (sampled here on a good conventional stereo -- who can imagine the wonders that await those with the equipment to render the DSD sound?). Give it a good sampling and see what you think. © TiVo
From
HI-RES$17.99
CD$11.99

Classical - Released August 27, 2013 | PentaTone

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Hi-Res Audio
The cycle of Beethoven sonata recordings by the Japanese-born, European-raised pianist Mari Kodama has inspired plenty of divergent reactions, and this ultimate release in the set seems likely to continue the pattern. Kodama was a student of Alfred Brendel, and she extends his fundamentally analytic approach in ways that can be extremely startling when applied to a work like the Piano Sonata No. 29 in B flat major, Op. 106 ("Hammerklavier"). Consider her cool approach to the generally violent opening movement, where she steers away from piano-shaking gestures in favor of clearly laying out the drastically innovative half-step and third relationships that underlie the entire sonata. There is no question of a "feminine" approach; Kodama can deliver violent power where she deems it necessary, as in the beginning of the second movement of the Piano Sonata No. 28 in A major, Op. 101. There she achieves a sharp demarcation between the meditatively melodic first movement and the more public march that follows. In the Piano Sonata No. 29, she tends to pair the first two movements, with the brief scherzo seeming to trail off from the opening movement, and the last two movements, with the bluesy Adagio sostenuto slow movement taken rather quickly and, despite its heavenly length, given the quality of prelude to the giant final fugue. Kodama's technical achievement in this treacherous fugue is impressive. But her interpretive daring is the greater achievement. The Op. 101 sonata has many lovely moments, but few indeed are the pianists who have rethought Op. 106 from the ground up and gotten away with it. Paired with perfect intimate engineering from the Dutch audiophile label PentaTone, this is an extraordinary Beethoven performance. © TiVo
From
HI-RES$17.99
CD$11.99

Classical - Released March 1, 2011 | PentaTone

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Hi-Res Audio
From
HI-RES$17.99
CD$11.99

Classical - Released April 17, 2020 | PentaTone

Hi-Res Booklet
After having recorded and performed all thirty-two of Beethoven’s Sonatas in concert, Mari Kodama, the Japanese pianist who grew up in Paris and was a student of Geneviève Joy-Dutilleux has now made a rather original contribution to the “Year of Beethoven”, with a selection of relatively unknown transcriptions, almost all of which are first recordings. This anthology includes piano interpretations of excerpts from Beethoven’s five string quartets in the style of the arrangements in vogue in the 18th and 19th centuries, which delighted many amateur musicians in private settings at a time when music only circulated through practice. Of course, these types of transcriptions are in great abundance, which Cyprien Katsaris demonstrated most tenaciously in his "A Chronological Odyssey" (Piano 21). Yet, what makes Mari Kodama’s choices so special here is that they have all been interpreted by Saint-Saëns, Balakirev and Moussorgski, who each added a little of their personality to the great maestro’s music. The grand finale of the album is a special treat as the last tracks are variations of Mozart’s Quintet with clarinet K. 581 in a transcription for fortepiano that was attributed to Beethoven and first published in Edinburgh in 1812 under the name of “ A Wonderful aria with variations of Mozart by Lewis van Beethoven”. © François Hudry/Qobuz
From
HI-RES$17.99
CD$11.99

Classical - Released November 18, 2016 | PentaTone

Hi-Res Booklet
Some of Pyotr Il'yich Tchaikovsky's most beloved music can be found in his three great ballets, which have become familiar to audiences in complete performances, as well as variously configured suites and arrangements. This hybrid SACD by pianists Mari Kodama and Momo Kodama offers transcriptions for piano duo by Sergey Rachmaninov, Anton Arensky, Eduard Leontyevich Langer, and Claude Debussy, which capture the brilliance and beauty of the original versions. One is struck by the faithfulness of the arrangers, who eschewed pyrotechnics in favor of accurately re-creating Tchaikovsky's music, and the keyboard versions often bring the orchestral sonorities and textures to mind. The selections also recommend themselves because of their tunefulness and accessibility, and it's likely that listeners will instantly recognize most of the pieces. For sampling, try the famous Adagio from Sleeping Beauty, the sparkling Overture from Nutcracker, or the Dance of the Cygnets from Swan Lake. The playing by the Kodama sisters is meticulous and finely polished, but their liveliness and virtuosity bring the music across with considerable excitement and a feeling of pure enjoyment. © TiVo
From
CD$9.99

Classical - Released December 6, 2019 | PentaTone

From
CD$11.99

Classical - Released October 10, 2014 | Berlin Classics

From
CD$8.99

Classical - Released January 27, 2009 | Analekta

Booklet
From
HI-RES$1.94
CD$1.55

Classical - Released July 10, 2020 | PentaTone

Hi-Res