Your basket is empty

Categories :

Similar artists

Albums

From
HI-RES$15.49
CD$11.99

Cello Concertos - Released July 7, 2017 | audite Musikproduktion

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
Any number of recordings on the market of Dvorak's Cello Concerto in B minor, Op. 104, make good choices: it's a beloved repertory work, and it is the lifetime chance for any cellist to shine. Nevertheless, there's a strong case for choosing this one by the respectably well-known, but not a household-name, French cellist Marc Coppey and the Deutsches Symphonie-Orchester Berlin under Kirill Karabits. First is the unusual pairing with Ernest Bloch's Schelomo, another prominent repertory work for the cello. As Coppey points out in his notes, both works were connected with the U.S.; Bloch's work was written before he moved to the country permanently, while Dvorak's concerto was written in the U.S. as the composer prepared to return home. Both are reflections on ethnicity, and they fit well together in unexpected ways. Dvorak's short tone poem Klid (Silent Woods) is a pleasant entr'acte. But the prime attraction is the Dvorak concerto itself: Coppey offers a full-blooded, passionate reading that may put the listener in mind of classic Czech performances by Janos Starker, for example. Sample the finale, where the maximum intensity is squeezed out of the rhapsodic ending. It's a virtuoso performance with fine coordination between orchestra and soloist. Highly recommended. © TiVo
From
HI-RES$15.49
CD$11.99

Classical - Released January 8, 2021 | audite Musikproduktion

Hi-Res Booklet
This live recording of the two Shostakovich cello concertos continues audite's cooperation with Marc Coppey, who approaches both works with boundless energy and without any sentimentality. Dmitri Shostakovich wrote two concertos for the cello, and both are dedicated to the most eminent Soviet cellist of his time: Mstislav Rostropovich. In 1959 he wrote his first cello concerto, whose musical language is almost classical but which also reveals an enormous panorama of moods, gestures and "stories". Seven years later, Shostakovich composed his second concerto; it builds on the confessional intensity of the first concerto but seems gloomier in character and is infused with threnodic tones. In this concert recording, Coppey performs alongside the Polish National Radio Symphony Orchestra under the baton of Lawrence Foster in the new Katowice concert hall. Also in 2021, Coppey will release his next CD on audite, dedicated to works by Kodály (Solo Sonata, Sonata for Cello and Piano, Duo for Cello and Violin); partners of Marc Coppey are Barnabás Kelemen (violin) and Matan Porat (piano). And the next recording project is already fixed, too: in April 2021, Coppey will record the solo concertos of Saint-Saëns and Lalo for audite, as well as Fauré's Elégie and Boëllmann's Variations symphoniques. © Audite
From
CD$13.49

Classical - Released September 1, 2003 | Aeon

From
CD$9.99

Chamber Music - Released August 26, 2016 | Phaia Music

From
CD$11.99

Cello Concertos - Released January 15, 2016 | audite Musikproduktion

Booklet
From
CD$8.99

Classical - Released September 11, 2008 | Aeon

From
CD$24.59

Classical - Released September 1, 2003 | Aeon

From
CD$10.49

Classical - Released September 22, 1995 | harmonia mundi

From
CD$16.99

Classical - Released September 11, 2008 | Aeon

From
CD$16.99

Classical - Released April 7, 2008 | Aeon

From
CD$24.59

Classical - Released January 10, 2006 | Aeon

From
CD$9.99

Classical - Released July 7, 2017 | Audite

Booklet
Any number of recordings on the market of Dvorak's Cello Concerto in B minor, Op. 104, make good choices: it's a beloved repertory work, and it is the lifetime chance for any cellist to shine. Nevertheless, there's a strong case for choosing this one by the respectably well-known, but not a household-name, French cellist Marc Coppey and the Deutsches Symphonie-Orchester Berlin under Kirill Karabits. First is the unusual pairing with Ernest Bloch's Schelomo, another prominent repertory work for the cello. As Coppey points out in his notes, both works were connected with the U.S.; Bloch's work was written before he moved to the country permanently, while Dvorak's concerto was written in the U.S. as the composer prepared to return home. Both are reflections on ethnicity, and they fit well together in unexpected ways. Dvorak's short tone poem Klid (Silent Woods) is a pleasant entr'acte. But the prime attraction is the Dvorak concerto itself: Coppey offers a full-blooded, passionate reading that may put the listener in mind of classic Czech performances by Janos Starker, for example. Sample the finale, where the maximum intensity is squeezed out of the rhapsodic ending. It's a virtuoso performance with fine coordination between orchestra and soloist. Highly recommended. © TiVo
From
CD$8.99

Classical - Released March 12, 2004 | Aeon

Despite being nearly unknown compared with his conducting grandson Christoph von Dohnányi, there are still occasional recordings of music by Ernö Dohnányi -- his muscular and lyrical Symphony No. 2, his dramatic and colorful Piano Concerto in E minor, his fervent and magnificent Piano Quintet in C minor -- and this disc adds three more pieces to the list. Performed with power and passion by four strong and sensitive French musicians, Dohnányi's sweet and soulful Cello Sonata in B flat, his tender and terrifying Violin Sonata in C sharp minor, and his quirky and compelling Serenade in C major for string trio will be welcome additions to any collection of the romantic music from the antebellum years of the Austro-Hungarian Empire. Anyone who loves late Brahms and Dvorák and is more than slightly suspicious of the early music of Schoenberg and Bartók will enjoy Dohnányi's well-composed, wonderfully expressive, and slightly ethnic music, and this disc helps make the case for his stature as a composer. Aeon's 2003 sound is close and warm and real. © TiVo