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Latin - Released November 5, 2013 | Sony Music Latin

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World - Released May 10, 2019 | Sony Music Latin

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World - Released September 28, 1999 | Columbia

Marc Anthony was a salsa superstar throughout the '90s, long before the Latin pop explosion of the 1999. Once Ricky Martin ushered in a new era of crossovers that spring with "Livin' La Vida Loca," there was a rush of crossover acts, almost enough to make it seem like Anthony was left behind. After all, his bid for mainstream success as the starring role in Paul Simon's Broadway musical The Capeman was undone as it became one of the Great White Way's most notorious failures. Still, Anthony had his own English-language album in the works. Titled Marc Anthony, the record appeared in the fall of 1999, guaranteeing it a shot at a mass audience, which is exactly what it was designed to do. As a matter of fact, it's almost a bit too calculated, opening with two interchangeable ballads that set the tone for a pleasant, subdued set of Latin-tinged adult contemporary pop. Anthony sings beautifully throughout, but he's never given the opportunity to be truly electric, the way he can be with hot salsa numbers. The liveliest the album gets is the catchy, mid-tempo single "I Need to Know," which is gently danceable, or the mild salsa of "That's Okay," and the Latin dance-pop of "She's Been Good to Me." The rest is almost all pop ballads, perfectly produced and gamely sung by Anthony. Some of these work very well, others simply fade into the slipstream. That's particularly frustrating because Anthony is such a talented singer that it's evident that he's capable of much more than this. Marc Anthony isn't bad for what it is, and a few of its singles are quite good, but it's not at the level of his earlier records, or Martin's crossover bid of 1999, either. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Salsa - Released July 27, 2004 | Dance Music

If there's anything made clear by the growing number of albums by Latin artists that are conceived with mainstream English-speaking audiences in mind, it's that something essential gets lost in translation. There's no doubt that the reigning king of Nuyoriquen salsa, Marc Anthony, has the musical chops and vocal talent to churn out hits regardless of genre -- but it's also true that not all of his efforts merit the same consideration. In English, as on Mended in 2002, Anthony's lyrics sound schlocky and overwrought, sort of like Air Supply tunes -- early favorites of the young New Yorker -- turned up to 11. Or, sung in Spanish in mainstream romantic ballad style, as on Amar Sin Mentiras, they embody the suffering of a Latin lover trapped in a geek's body. You'd feel a little sorry for the guy if you didn't know that he was nonetheless managing to tap into a whole new pool of swooning fans. Fortunately, every so often Anthony decides to stop fooling around and records an album showcasing his genius in its natural habitat. Valió la Pena, named Best Salsa Album of 2005 at the Latin Grammys, is one such album. Featuring the same set as on Amar Sin Mentiras, only put to salsa like the good señor intended it to be, Valió la Pena was produced by keyboard player and sometime vocalist Sergio George, last heard behind other top-shelf Marc Anthony records like Todo a Su Tiempo. With the screaming hot brass and relentlessly sexy percussion to match the love-crazed lyrics, and the love-crazed lyrics to match Anthony's screaming hot vocals and relentlessly sexy improvisation, Valió la Pena captures the drama and excitement palpable in New York's best salsa clubs. It's not the perfect dance album -- there are a few too many rhythm breaks and sudden changes of dynamics for that -- but it is guaranteed to get hasta el geek más lamentable del mundo in the mood. And isn't it time you got in touch with your inner Latin lover? © Jenny Gage /TiVo
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World - Released July 23, 2013 | Sony Music Latin

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World - Released January 1, 1997 | National Own

While it doesn't quite match the dizzying heights of his breakthrough Todo a Su Tiempo, Marc Anthony's third album Contra la Corriente is nevertheless a barnstormer of a record. Anthony is no typical salsa singer -- he's a powerful, bold singer who doesn't follow the genre's traditions. He ignores improvisation and concentrates on love songs, but the very sensuality of his vocals and music is his trademark. There might not be as many great songs here as on Todo a Su Tiempo, but there are no bad tunes, and Contra la Corriente on the whole captures his soaring, sexy vocals in a near-flawless manner. © Terry Jenkins /TiVo
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Salsa - Released June 30, 2006 | Sony Music Latin

The second greatest-hits package from Latin superstar Marc Anthony, Sigo Siendo Yo: Grandes Exitos focuses on material from the five studio albums released since 1999's Desde un Principio collection. Its 14 Spanish-language tracks include the U.S. Hot Latin hits "Dimelo," "Ahora Quien," and "Muy Dentro de Mi," his duet with future wife Jennifer Lopez on "No Me Ames," and two previously unreleased songs, "Lo Que No Di" and "Que Precio Tiene el Cielo," all of which showcase his unique modern salsa sound. © Jon O'Brien /TiVo
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Soundtracks - Released July 24, 2007 | Sony Music Latin

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Salsa - Released October 23, 2001 | Sony Music Latin

Even when Marc Anthony had accomplished his major goals of becoming one of the world's best-selling salsa singers, getting successfully involved in the English-language market as well, he decided to look over his roots once again, delving into songwriting to follow his previous Latin dance record, Contra La Corriente, released in 1997. Recorded over an eight-month period, Libre comprised nine songs, including the hit single "Celos" and the brilliantly made "Este Loco Que te Mira," "Hasta Que Vuelvas Conmigo," and "Barco a la Deriva." Flawless and seductive, Libre comes to an end with "Caminaré," getting Marc Anthony closer to one of Cuban music's treasures, a Latin style known as bolero. © Drago Bonacich /TiVo
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World - Released January 1, 1995 | National Own

Though Marc Anthony was by many standards an established presence in the field before the 1995 release of Todo a Su Tiempo, it was this record that announced his reign as the crown prince of salsa. Previous projects had shown promise and abundant talent, but never before the level of polish, taste, and confidence present here. His second album with producer Sergio George was certainly a step forward from their 1993 release of Otra Nota. Two years seem to have cleansed this creative duo of its desire for the emotive pop schmaltz that plagued its previous record. Free from these self-destructive longings, George and Anthony set to crafting a crystalline, shimmering, and yet warm contemporary salsa sound that would set the bar for the decade. With musicians like bass player Ruben Rodriguez, percussionists Bobby Allende, Marc Quiñones, and Luis Quintero, trumpet player and arranger Angel Fernandez, and several other modern masters, this is one for the books, vocal performance notwithstanding. Anthony's voice is soaring and luminescent, as salsa lovers have now come to expect of him. With an enviable range and perhaps the finest improvisational abilities on the scene today, Marc Anthony has earned his reputation. Todo a Su Tiempo is without question one of the finest salsa records of the '90s. © Evan C. Gutierrez /TiVo
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World - Released September 23, 2016 | Magnus Media, LLC

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Salsa - Released May 24, 2010 | Sony Music Latin

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Salsa - Released June 8, 2004 | Sony Music Latin

Delivering an album like Amar sin Mentiras shows that Marc Anthony isn't concerned right now with grabbing new fans. Instead he's focused on those who swoon and scream whenever he "brings it down a little." Urgent, passionate, and very limited, this is Anthony's Latin pop album, not a pop album nor a salsa album. If you were unaware that he was being so strict with the motifs, you're not alone, but it's an easy way to steer away anyone expecting something fiery or light. The album is heavy, heavy with passion and heavy with heartbreak with barely any percussion. The light beats of "Valió la Pena" and "Tan Solo Palabras" break things up just a little, but Anthony gets breathy just to make sure dancing doesn't overtake swooning. He's in fine voice throughout, the arrangements are lush without being drippy, and the melodies are solid. There's also the ballad with new "not-talkin'-about-it" bride Jennifer Lopez which will give fans plenty to discuss but just adds to the single-mindedness of the album. Can you fault Anthony for recording an album that a certain faction of his fans will devour? Not when he's so good at it. To paraphrase a cliché, the little, teen, middle-aged, and golden-aged girls will understand and the rest should just stay out of their way. © David Jeffries /TiVo
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Pop - Released January 1, 2006 | National Own

Desde Un Principio is a superb collection of Marc Anthony's biggest salsa hits, which preceded the English language success he attained with his 1999 self-titled album. The only complaint is that several of the songs are severely truncated, especially toward the end, but, nonetheless, this proves to be an ideal introduction to the singer, especially for fans who became aware of him only after "I Need to Know"." This album, arranged more or less chronologically, assembles four songs from his debut, Otra Nota, including his gutsy take on Juan Gabriel's "Hasta Que Te Conoci," four songs from his fantastic sophomore album, Todo A Su Tiempo, and four from Contra La Corriente. The album also includes "No Me Ames," his hit duet with Jennifer Lopez from her album On the 6 (which, to Lopez's credit, is surprisingly good), and "Vivir Lo Nuestro," his sizzling duet with India from her album Dicen Que Soy. Finally, the album also includes his version of "Preciosa," which is a tribute to Puerto Rico, and his rendition makes one believe it was written specifically for him. Marc Anthony's delivery is always passionate, sophisticated, and elegant, and, despite a serious lack of liner notes, Desde Un Prinicpio proves a wonderful introduction to the music of Marc Anthony, a singer that, undoubtedly, will one day rank among the best. © Jose F. Promis /TiVo
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Pop/Rock - Released May 21, 2002 | Columbia

After several release date shuffles, Marc Anthony issued his sophomore English-language set, Mended, in 2002, shortly after issuing Libre, another excellent Spanish-language salsa album. (Note that both album covers are from the same photo shoot.) Mended delivers more of Anthony's passionate, urgent songs of love and betrayal, destined for mass consumption, which is what his English-speaking fans have been clamoring for. Shining moments include the fiery and exotic single "I've Got You," which also closes off the album as the Spanish-language track "Te Tengo Aquí," the sexy, mid-tempo "Love Won't Get Any Better," and the album's true highlight, the gutsy, electric, and relentless "Tragedy." That song, incidentally, was slated to be the album's first single, and had begun receiving radio play in the U.S., but was pulled after the events of September 11th. Despite these surefire hits, the album is weighted down by quite a bit of unremarkable material, including "I Reach for You" and "Give Me a Reason," the latter of which seems borderline listless. And the ballads -- oh, the melodrama! None of the many ballads come close to the soaring heights of "You Sang to Me," the closest of which, "I Wanna Be Free," still doesn't match the beauty of that earlier hit. The lyrics are gooey, and the songs seem quite middle of the road, although "Everything You Do," which could have easily come off as pure schlock, winds up being quite likable. So, despite some remarkable moments and Anthony's always excellent singing, the almost too exquisitely produced Mended seems somewhat anticlimactic, which is a shame, considering the breadth of Marc Anthony's undeniable talent. © Jose F. Promis /TiVo
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Latin - Released September 28, 2018 | Sony Music Latin

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World - Released January 1, 1993 | National Own

Otra Nota was the world's introduction to a young salsero who later in his career would be crowned king. Even on his debut performance, Marc Anthony has a developed, unique, and individual voice. Though he is still quite youthful here and the album is smoother around the edges than more recent works, it is evident that Anthony has brought quality and passion to his listeners from the beginning. The memorable melodies and singable coros that made Anthony a household name are present from the very first track, "Palabras de Alma." His edgy improvisation and wide vocal range are showcased well with tunes like "Hasta Que Te Conoci" and "Necesito Amarte." With much more pop influence than future projects, this release contains English-language tunes like "Make It with You." The reverb-saturated and synthesizer-heavy production typical of the time period soaks Anthony's pop-oriented balladry. Thankfully, these elements do not affect the majority of the salsa-driven repertoire. Super-producer Sergio George's mark is unmistakable, having worked with some of the genre's most successful artists. Though the production is quite dated in places, the overall quality of the arrangements is outstanding. Stylistic considerations notwithstanding, Anthony's debut is at the least a strong promise for the future, and arguably as strong as any release to follow. © Evan C. Gutierrez /TiVo
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World - Released January 1, 2003 | National Own

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World - Released August 27, 2021 | Sony Music Latin

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Latin - Released November 12, 2020 | Sony Music Latin

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