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Alternative & Indie - Released April 30, 2021 | Loma Vista Recordings

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Alternative & Indie - Released July 28, 2017 | Concord Loma Vista

Manchester Orchestra isn’t from England but from Atlanta, on the other side of the Atlantic. The ocean is probably the stretch to which this spectacular music— or epic maybe—makes us think of and in which you would like to let go. It’s a rather lyric indie rock, with an almost cinematographic edge sometimes, which never holds back its generosity. With guitars in abundance, beautiful vocal harmonies and contagious choruses, this fifth album from Andy Hull’s band sounds like Fleet Foxes on amphetamines or even, in their most commercial moments, Coldplay. It’s an invigorating disc which clearly fleshes out the charisma of Manchester Orchestra. © CM/Qobuz
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Rock - Released January 1, 2014 | Concord - Loma Vista - Caroline

Coming on the heels of their fourth studio album, 2014's Cope, the Atlanta, Georgia-based outfit Manchester Orchestra deliver Hope. A companion album to Cope, Hope features stripped-down, largely acoustic reworkings of the songs from Cope. Included here are such songs as "Top Notch," "Girl Harbor," and "Every Stone." Primarily known for their deeply intense, cathartic, indie rock sound, Manchester Orchestra wanted to offer a more intimate and emotionally resonant experience to Manchester Orchestra's fans. While there are electric flourishes throughout Hope, most of the tracks here showcase lead singer/guitarist Andy Hull's yearning vocals framed in warm acoustic guitar, piano, and percussion. Ironically, Manchester Orchestra intended Cope as an even more intense, grayscale return to their early punk rock-influenced sound. Consequently, Hope works in perfect counterpoint to its darker, harsher predecessor. And certainly, while Hull has a knack for crafting blistering emo-epics, at the core of many of his songs there is a melodic lyricism and tender emotionality that lends itself to just the kind of delicate treatment achieved on Hope. Ultimately, if Cope displayed the group's hard-won maturity as a journeyman rock band, then Hope reveals the depths of that maturity. © Matt Collar /TiVo
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Alternative & Indie - Released May 6, 2011 | Favorite Gentlemen Recordings

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Alternative & Indie - Released July 27, 2018 | Concord Loma Vista

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Pop/Rock - Released April 21, 2009 | Favorite Gentlemen - Canvasback

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Alternative & Indie - Released November 8, 2019 | Loma Vista Recordings

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Alternative & Indie - Released January 1, 2013 | Concord - Loma Vista - Caroline

Manchester Orchestra's fourth studio effort, 2014's Cope, is a heavy, often dark, yet incredibly melodic album that finds the Atlanta outfit delving deep into its post-hardcore roots. Recorded in part at the band's home studio -- which is actually just lead singer Andy Hull's parents' house, where he recorded the band's debut as a teenager -- Cope follows up the group's ambitious 2011 concept album Simple Math. As with that album, Cope features Hull's longstanding themes of anger, pain, loss, and insecurity, both personal and professional. But where Simple Math found the band investigating a more varied tonal palette, here they stick to a sheer wall of electric guitar grit and grayscale harmonics. Which is, of course, the point, as the band wanted to adhere to a cohesive sound for the whole album. Which isn't to say that the album is predictable. On the contrary, Manchester Orchestra have proven themselves to be a fluid band capable of bashing you over the head with heavy metal riffs one second and lifting you cloudward with a single two-line hook the next. Cope is no exception, and cuts like the leadoff "Top Notch" and the slowly insistent "Trees" pummel you with a brick layer's precision and stick in your head like hardened concrete. In that sense, Manchester Orchestra's sound on Cope brings to mind Tool's aggressive intensity combined with Built to Spill's ceaseless gift for inventive guitar layering. Similarly, tracks like "Choose You," "Girl Harbor," and "Every Stone" are propulsive anthems with emotive, hooky melodies that grab your heart just as much as your ear. There is a hard-won maturity to Cope, as if Hull and his band -- closing in on their thirties, still grinding out their musical dreams in the house Hull grew up in -- set out to make the last great post-hardcore record. That might be a somewhat lofty goal, but Cope is more than just the sound of a band getting by; it's the sound of Manchester Orchestra at their best. © Matt Collar /TiVo
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Alternative & Indie - Released June 29, 2018 | Loma Vista Recordings

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Alternative & Indie - Released November 8, 2019 | Loma Vista Recordings

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Alternative & Indie - Released June 24, 2019 | Atlantic Records UK

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Alternative & Indie - Released June 8, 2018 | Concord Loma Vista

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Alternative & Indie - Released September 25, 2020 | Loma Vista Recordings

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Alternative & Indie - Released February 23, 2018 | Concord Loma Vista

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Alternative & Indie - Released July 13, 2018 | Dead Oceans

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Alternative & Indie - Released March 30, 2018 | Concord Loma Vista

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Rock - Released April 14, 2009 | Columbia - Legacy

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Alternative & Indie - Released January 1, 2013 | Concord - Loma Vista - Caroline

Manchester Orchestra's fourth studio effort, 2014's Cope, is a heavy, often dark, yet incredibly melodic album that finds the Atlanta outfit delving deep into its post-hardcore roots. Recorded in part at the band's home studio -- which is actually just lead singer Andy Hull's parents' house, where he recorded the band's debut as a teenager -- Cope follows up the group's ambitious 2011 concept album Simple Math. As with that album, Cope features Hull's longstanding themes of anger, pain, loss, and insecurity, both personal and professional. But where Simple Math found the band investigating a more varied tonal palette, here they stick to a sheer wall of electric guitar grit and grayscale harmonics. Which is, of course, the point, as the band wanted to adhere to a cohesive sound for the whole album. Which isn't to say that the album is predictable. On the contrary, Manchester Orchestra have proven themselves to be a fluid band capable of bashing you over the head with heavy metal riffs one second and lifting you cloudward with a single two-line hook the next. Cope is no exception, and cuts like the leadoff "Top Notch" and the slowly insistent "Trees" pummel you with a brick layer's precision and stick in your head like hardened concrete. In that sense, Manchester Orchestra's sound on Cope brings to mind Tool's aggressive intensity combined with Built to Spill's ceaseless gift for inventive guitar layering. Similarly, tracks like "Choose You," "Girl Harbor," and "Every Stone" are propulsive anthems with emotive, hooky melodies that grab your heart just as much as your ear. There is a hard-won maturity to Cope, as if Hull and his band -- closing in on their thirties, still grinding out their musical dreams in the house Hull grew up in -- set out to make the last great post-hardcore record. That might be a somewhat lofty goal, but Cope is more than just the sound of a band getting by; it's the sound of Manchester Orchestra at their best. © Matt Collar /TiVo
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Alternative & Indie - Released December 16, 2008 | Favorite Gentlemen - Canvasback

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Alternative & Indie - Released December 1, 2017 | Concord Loma Vista