Categories :

Similar artists

Albums

CD$11.99

Jazz - Released June 28, 2013 | ENJA RECORDS Werner Aldinger

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography - The Qobuz Standard
This CD reissues one of the first Enja recordings, a trio outing for pianist Mal Waldron, bassist Jimmy Woode and drummer Pierre Favre. Waldron has continued to evolve through the decades while keeping his basic sound. A master at using repetition and brooding chords, Waldron is in excellent form on five of his originals plus Woode's brief "M.C," playing with a knowledge of the avant-garde but still connected to the hard bop tradition. © Scott Yanow /TiVo
CD$11.99

Jazz - Released October 10, 1988 | ENJA RECORDS Werner Aldinger

Distinctions The Qobuz Standard
CD$8.99

Jazz - Released January 1, 1962 | Prestige

HI-RES$14.99
CD$9.99

Jazz - Released July 29, 2014 | Bethlehem Records

Hi-Res
This obscure CD reissue has the wrong date listed (it is from February 24, 1959, not November 1957) and fails to mention that altoist Jackie McLean sits in with pianist Mal Waldron's trio (which includes bassist Julian Euell and drummer Al Dreares) on the title cut, a number co-written by Waldron and Billie Holiday. Although Waldron dedicated the album to Lady Day and talks about her a bit on the last track in a short interview with vibraphonist Teddy Charles (which was recorded a bit later), he actually only performs one song from her repertoire: "You Don't Know What Love Is." Otherwise this rather brief CD has the title cut, two other typically brooding Waldron originals plus Sonny Rollins' "Airegin." McLean's emotional alto is such a strong asset on the title cut that one wishes he were on the rest of this worthwhile set. © Scott Yanow /TiVo
CD$8.99

Jazz - Released March 10, 2015 | Progressive

CD$7.99

Bebop - Released January 1, 1966 | Universal Digital Enterprises

CD$7.99

Miscellaneous - Released May 1, 2018 | Universal Digital Enterprises

CD$8.99

Jazz - Released December 31, 1987 | Soul Note

This solo set by pianist Mal Waldron serves as a perfect introduction to his unique style during the more recent part of his career. Waldron performs four standards (including "Night In Tunisia" and "I Should Care") which show off his roots, but most significant are his lengthy "Free For C.T." and "Variations On A Theme By Cecil Taylor." It is always very interesting to hear musicians who started out in straightforward hard bop stretching themselves and playing quite freely. This recording rewards repeated listenings. © Scott Yanow /TiVo
CD$7.99

Free Jazz & Avant-Garde - Released January 1, 2008 | hatOLOGY

CD$8.99

Jazz - Released January 28, 2009 | Timeless Records

CD$7.99

Jazz - Released November 27, 2013 | Marylebone Records

CD$8.99

Jazz - Released August 18, 2006 | Fuel 2000

On Steinway was originally recorded in 1972 and issued on LP only in Japan on the independent Teichiku imprint. It contains four selections, all of which were composed by Mal Waldron. The pieces here are not Waldron's most adventurous, but that's just fine, because what's on offer is delightful. The opener, "Portrait of a Bullfighter," is compelling for its use of Latin rhythmic figures, and its transition into a ballad about halfway through. Waldron's use of a limited chromatic palette makes the piece taut yet dynamically fluid. "One for Bud" is Waldron's tribute to the pianist who influenced him most. It employs Powell's right-hand technique of creating long single-note runs, but Waldron imposes his own notion of phrasing, arpeggio, and scale while once more keeping a firm grip on the chord figures of the left hand. The most beautiful of these pieces is "For Erik Satie," in which the pianist employs a single-chord vamp for its entirety, while engaging mysterious, elliptical lyric figures in the melody. A ballad, it employs Eastern scales and modes in places, and the use of silence and space is pure Waldron. The set closes with "Paris Reunited," the longest thing here in which folk melodies, French popular tunes, and bebop are interlaced in swells of notes before shifting chromatic gears in the middle toward something moodier and melancholy, to the point of near elegy before coming out the other side into a swell of pastoral emotion. In sum, this is a fine and curious date; it showcases the pianist using the Steinway as a compositional element in his tunes and puts a different side of his mercurial musical personality on display. © Thom Jurek /TiVo
CD$14.99

Jazz - Released February 1, 1972 | Deutsche Grammophon ECM

CD$8.99

Jazz - Released November 19, 1970 | Futura Marge - Atypeek Music

CD$14.99

Jazz - Released February 1, 1972 | ECM

CD$3.99

Jazz - Released January 1, 1990 | Phoenix USA

CD$7.49

Contemporary Jazz - Released April 2, 1995 | Slam Productions

Following the success of their earlier collaboration, Mal Waldron and George Haslam continue with a sly collection of standards and originals. As before, there is a remarkable telepathy between the players, which translates to some delightful interaction between these two masters. Haslam must be one of the most underrated players on saxophone. Here, he shows a strong command of both the baritone and soprano saxophones, as well as the taragato, which he blows on "From Charleston 'til Now." Waldron picks every note as though it is his last, his mastery of the keyboard incorporating the history of the modern tradition from Monk to beyond. His essentially lyrical approach makes him a favorite of players like Steve Lacy and George Haslam, both of whom appreciate the sophisticated mix of modern harmony and melodic invention. © Steve Loewy /TiVo
CD$7.49

Contemporary Jazz - Released February 21, 1994 | Slam Productions

Mal Waldron's dark, circumspect approach is in full force as he carves agile lines with the help of British baritone saxophonist George Haslam. The diverse program includes a couple of standards ("I Got It Bad [And That Ain't Good]" and "If I Were a Bell"), a twist on a classical favorite ("Variations on Brahms 3, Movement 3"), a Waldron original ("A Time for Duke"), a tune by Haslam ("The Vortex"), and a couple of jointly improvised efforts ("Catch as Catch Could" and "Motion in Order"). The two musicians are fully in sync, aside from the few times, particularly on the improvised pieces, where there is a tendency to ramble. Haslam boasts a singularly attractive, thin tone that balances the pianist's dense styling. The commanding improvisations by both Haslam and Waldron straddle the boundaries of free and post-bop jazz in a compellingly charming way. © Steve Loewy /TiVo
CD$7.99

Jazz - Released April 30, 1990 | 1201 MUSIC

CD$11.99

Jazz - Released April 17, 2020 | Yellowbird Records

Pianist Mal Waldron's music is characterized by a heavily-brooding rhythmic quality, with the left hand usually carrying the theme at one repetitious tempo while the right hammers away in juxtaposition with a counter tempo (usually faster). Such was the case with "Up Popped the Devil," "Snake Out" and "Changachangachang," three very Waldronian pieces in both structure and execution, the latter deriving its melody from the whole-tone scale. Aside from Waldron, the record's strongest points were bassist Reggie Workman and drummer Billy Higgins, their work being sensitive and supportive throughout. © Bob Rusch, Cadence /TiVo