Categories :

Similar artists

Albums

CD$12.99

Jazz - Released June 26, 2020 | The Funk Garage

Maceo Parker doesn't play funk, he IS funk! Inseparable from the Godfather James Brown who he accompanied for years but also having worked as George Clinton’s accomplice in Parliament and P-Funk, it seems like Maceo Parker will be blowing down his saxophone right up to his very last breath! At the age of 77, the legend from North Carolina is still making music, revealing here his first album in eight years. An album recorded with signature sticky sound of the “Big Easy”. It was there, in New Orleans, that Maceo took his funk to create Soul Food: Cooking with Maceo produced by Eli Wolf. With the help of Ivan Neville, Nikki Glaspie and Tony Hall, he revisits local standards signed by Dr. John (Right Place, Wrong Time), The Meters (Just Kissed My Baby) and Allen Toussaint (Yes, We Can Can). Other covers of songs by Aretha Franklin (Rock Steady), Prince ( The Other Side of the Pillow) and David “Fathead” Newman (Hard Times) complete a rather conventional yet incredibly sincere and warm album. A true fusion of his style with the funk of the bayou. © Max Dembo/Qobuz
CD$11.99

Jazz - Released September 1, 1992 | MINOR MUSIC

A scorching album of funky grooves from Maceo Parker, assisted by the rest of the JB's on backing horns. The album was recorded in concert at a club called Stadtgarten in Cologne, Germany, and the crowd seems just as responsive in most ways as any Atlanta mob. Along with the JB horns, Vincent Henry accompanies on bass throughout the album/concert. The album starts out with an original Maceo composition, then moves into a pair from his old boss James Brown. After that, there's another Maceo number, a cover of "Addictive Love," a rendition of "Georgia on My Mind," and a composition undertaken by a veritable army of funk veterans. This is probably just about the best solo Maceo Parker album there is, at least until the release of Funkoverload. If you're a funk fan, or a soul-jazz fan, this album might just provide what you need. Maceo on his own always provides a nice collection of soul and funk, and this one is no exception. © Adam Greenberg /TiVo
CD$8.99

Soul - Released August 25, 1998 | What Are Records?

Having steered the mothership and worked as a triggerman for the Godfather of Soul, storied sax man Maceo Parker now brings his own tight rhythm and soul sound to vinyl (er, plastic) in undeniable proof that he's still "got it." Combining his smoking horn with the backing of fellow legends such as trombonist Fred Wesley and new bloods such as son Corey (whose intermittent raps colorfully enhance the album's youthful vibrance), Maceo works through the familiar funk and soul lines of his Parliament and JB days and adds new twists to such classics as Marvin Gaye's "Let's Get It On" and "Inner City Blues," Stevie Wonder's "Tell Me Something Good," and Sly Stone's "Sing a Simple Song," while offering a number of his own well-orchestrated and well-seasoned compositions. "Youth of the World" features Maceo on a lead vocal reminiscent of Kool Moe Dee or Kurtis Blow, while "Do You Love Me" rises like Tower of Power before the sultry Chicago lines of closer "Going in Circles." Though Maceo's original lyrical attempts may be a bit immature, his years of experience and hard work shine through with every brassy attack and smooth soul note. © Matthew Robinson /TiVo
CD$8.99

Soul - Released June 17, 2003 | What Are Records?

3 stars out of 5 - "...The hot holler of Parker's horn is the main attraction, as it should be..." © TiVo
CD$8.99

Soul - Released April 18, 2000 | What Are Records?

HI-RES$15.49
CD$11.99

Soul - Released September 23, 2015 | MINOR MUSIC

Hi-Res Booklet
HI-RES$20.49
CD$15.49

Funk - Released February 14, 2018 | MINOR MUSIC

Hi-Res Booklet
A scorching album of funky grooves from Maceo Parker, assisted by the rest of the JB's on backing horns. The album was recorded in concert at a club called Stadtgarten in Cologne, Germany, and the crowd seems just as responsive in most ways as any Atlanta mob. Along with the JB horns, Vincent Henry accompanies on bass throughout the album/concert. The album starts out with an original Maceo composition, then moves into a pair from his old boss James Brown. After that, there's another Maceo number, a cover of "Addictive Love," a rendition of "Georgia on My Mind," and a composition undertaken by a veritable army of funk veterans. This is probably just about the best solo Maceo Parker album there is, at least until the release of Funkoverload. If you're a funk fan, or a soul-jazz fan, this album might just provide what you need. Maceo on his own always provides a nice collection of soul and funk, and this one is no exception. © Adam Greenberg /TiVo
CD$13.99

R&B - Released September 18, 2012 | Razor & Tie

Maceo Parker's brilliant legacy as the saxophonist in James Brown's '60s and '70s bands is never far from his musical thoughts -- and on this explosive, funked- and jazzed-up live set, he digs into those glory days with a bold, brassy, and pumped-up twist on "Papa's Got a Brand New Bag" (featuring Parker on vocals and sax) and a drum, bass, and improvisation-heavy romp through "Soul Power." These are the centerpiece tracks on a live concert recording of a high-energy November, 2011 show at the Leverkusener Jazz Festival in Leverkusener, Germany -- a set that backs Parker's own small group (bass great Christian McBride and drummer Core Coleman-Dunham) with the WDR Big Band, a Cologne-based 15-piece orchestra led by conductor/arranger Michael Abene. It's a reunion of sorts for the saxophonist and this dynamic ensemble, who worked together on the similarly dynamic 2008 set Roots & Grooves, a set of covers and originals dedicated to Parker's greatest musical influence, Ray Charles. The saxman's intent here is to cover a wider range of soul music that has influenced him and those of subsequent generations, and his choice of material and arrangements are stellar, fluid, and grooving to the point where toe tapping, singing, and dancing along is inevitable. Best among the choices are expansive spins through two irrepressible Stevie Wonder gems, "I Wish" (whose eight minutes allow for plenty of horn sizzle and a feisty drum solo) and the swinging, bluesy "Higher Ground." Parker pays homage to Aretha Franklin with a simmering, sizzling "Rock Steady," and cools his heels on covers of deep R&B tracks by Harold Melvin & the Blue Notes, Isaac Hayes, and a smooth, jazzy stroll through Larry Graham's "One in a Million You." Parker adds to his own catalog as a composer on the final track, "Come by and See Me," a freewheeling jam that channels Brown's spirit perfectly. After nearly five decades in the spotlight, Parker was still looking forward -- and his audience couldn't get enough. © Jonathan Widran /TiVo