Similar artists

Albums

$14.99
$12.99

Rap/Hip-Hop - Released August 3, 2018 | Warner Bros.

Hi-Res
$14.99
$12.99

Rap/Hip-Hop - Released September 16, 2016 | Warner Bros.

Hi-Res
$12.99

Rap/Hip-Hop - Released August 3, 2018 | Warner Bros.

$17.99
$15.49

Rap/Hip-Hop - Released September 18, 2015 | Warner Bros.

Hi-Res
Mac Miller proved he had swagger with his 2011 debut Blue Slide Park, and then offered some artistic depth with his adventurous, reckless, and overly wandering sophomore release Watching Movies with the Sound Off. Learning from previous mistakes while retaining all that was good about his second LP, this third dispatch from the heart of Pittsburgh adds a slurry and mush-mouthed style that sounds like the confident Miller is now so laid-back, the words leaving his mouth are quite tired from their uphill climb. The great single "100 Grandkids" suggests it is actually a post-junkie style as "I swear to God, I put the 'hero' in heroin" blasts out loud and proud, although there's no doubting the wiser moments on this third album are all post-rehab and even prouder, as the quest for clarity is the rapper's current vice. Big baller "Brand Name" looks to beat the odds with "To everyone who sells me drugs, don't mix it with that bullshit/I'm tryin' not to join the 27 club" as it does the "American Ninja to these obstacles" with one of the numerous beats from the production team ID Labs, who have a newfound love of luminous soul music. Miller is still digging on the dreamy sound of cloud rap and brings in producers Drew Byrd and Thundercat for the heavenly "Break the Law" ("I killed it like Jeffrey Dahmer killed the '80s"), which features Lil B as guest rapper and motivational speaker. Vinylz is the beatmaker for "Cut the Check" where Chief Keef joins for a stoned mix of trap and dub, plus the cut is dropped in the fourth quarter of an album that has no problem reaching 17 tracks. Getting sober and ridding himself of depression are topics that GO:OD AM touches upon, but rather than his past, the "show and prove" Miller is driven by his rebirth on an interesting and infectious LP that's also his strongest to date. ~ David Jeffries
$1.49

Rap/Hip-Hop - Released July 28, 2016 | Warner Bros.

$1.29

Rap/Hip-Hop - Released June 1, 2010 | Rostrum Records

Rap/Hip-Hop - Released September 9, 2016 | Warner Bros.

Download not available
$12.99

Rap/Hip-Hop - Released September 16, 2016 | Warner Bros.

$1.49

Rap/Hip-Hop - Released September 15, 2016 | Warner Bros.

Rap/Hip-Hop - Released June 30, 2014 | Rostrum Records

Download not available
$9.99

Rap/Hip-Hop - Released May 17, 2011 | Rostrum Records

$14.99
$12.99

Rap/Hip-Hop - Released October 28, 2016 | Warner Bros.

Hi-Res
As a way to illustrate the sincerity implied in its title, The Divine Feminine begins and ends with the voices of women. Ariana Grande introduces Mac Miller's first Warner Bros. release, and in its conclusion, Miller's grandmother details with fondness the history of her relationship with her husband. In between the two tracks, to the point of compulsion, Miller frequently notes his aptitude in the bedroom and his insatiable appetite therein, or wherever else the mood strikes. Crass as it frequently is, the bulk of the album nonetheless has more to do with loving relationships than most releases from the manchild R&B classes of 2011-2016. Miller even sings a higher percentage of his words in his limited and sincere drawl, rhapsodizing "You just don't know how beautiful you are" on "My Favorite Part," a clean duet with new flame Grande that sounds like it could be an Anthony Hamilton cover. Miller's producers are in accordance with all the lovestruck sentiments. They outfit the songs with twirling strings, punching horns, and lively pianos, the last of which is provided by Robert Glasper on the woozy, Kendrick Lamar-assisted "God Is Fair, Sexy, Nasty." In the dazed but laser-focused ballad "Skin," there's a recurring impassioned saxophone line, and at one point it punctuates Miller's purr of "I open up your legs and go straight for your heart." The album's first half is highlighted by another Anderson Paak collaboration, "Dang!," a sharp hybrid of horn-flecked funk and spangly house. It's surpassed during the second half by the combination of "Soulmate," a sticky/slippery Dâm-Funk production, and "We," a beatific mellow groove elevated by the harmonious voices of CeeLo Green and Thundercat. At all times, Miller and his associates are on the same page. Another aspect that makes this the rapper's most fulfilling album is that all the lines about being saved and in awe seem to be expressed with as much ease as the anatomical references, like they're plain facts, not wrenching confessions. ~ Andy Kellman
$1.49

Rap/Hip-Hop - Released July 23, 2018 | Warner Bros.

$15.49

Rap/Hip-Hop - Released September 18, 2015 | Warner Bros.

Mac Miller proved he had swagger with his 2011 debut Blue Slide Park, and then offered some artistic depth with his adventurous, reckless, and overly wandering sophomore release Watching Movies with the Sound Off. Learning from previous mistakes while retaining all that was good about his second LP, this third dispatch from the heart of Pittsburgh adds a slurry and mush-mouthed style that sounds like the confident Miller is now so laid-back, the words leaving his mouth are quite tired from their uphill climb. The great single "100 Grandkids" suggests it is actually a post-junkie style as "I swear to God, I put the 'hero' in heroin" blasts out loud and proud, although there's no doubting the wiser moments on this third album are all post-rehab and even prouder, as the quest for clarity is the rapper's current vice. Big baller "Brand Name" looks to beat the odds with "To everyone who sells me drugs, don't mix it with that bullshit/I'm tryin' not to join the 27 club" as it does the "American Ninja to these obstacles" with one of the numerous beats from the production team ID Labs, who have a newfound love of luminous soul music. Miller is still digging on the dreamy sound of cloud rap and brings in producers Drew Byrd and Thundercat for the heavenly "Break the Law" ("I killed it like Jeffrey Dahmer killed the '80s"), which features Lil B as guest rapper and motivational speaker. Vinylz is the beatmaker for "Cut the Check" where Chief Keef joins for a stoned mix of trap and dub, plus the cut is dropped in the fourth quarter of an album that has no problem reaching 17 tracks. Getting sober and ridding himself of depression are topics that GO:OD AM touches upon, but rather than his past, the "show and prove" Miller is driven by his rebirth on an interesting and infectious LP that's also his strongest to date. ~ David Jeffries
$1.49

Rap/Hip-Hop - Released May 30, 2018 | Warner Bros.

$9.99

Rap/Hip-Hop - Released June 18, 2013 | Rostrum Records

Rap/Hip-Hop - Released November 15, 2011 | Rostrum Records

Download not available
$9.99

Rap/Hip-Hop - Released April 12, 2012 | Rostrum Records

$1.29

Rap/Hip-Hop - Released March 26, 2013 | Rostrum Records

$1.49

Rap/Hip-Hop - Released July 13, 2018 | Warner Bros.

News feed Prev. Next