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World - Released February 24, 2017 | UMLE - Latino

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World - Released November 17, 2017 | Echame La Culpa PS

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World - Released February 1, 2019 | UMLE - Latino

Vida has been a long time coming. Luis Fonsi's ninth studio album is also his first in five years. What's more, it follows the release of his global record-breaking chart topper "Despacito (feat. Daddy Yankee) by two years. That's an eternity between hit and album, but Fonsi's hardly been idle. Two other high-climbing collaborative tracks were issued in the interim -- "Imposible" (featuring the silky-smooth voice of Ozuna) and "Calypso" (feat. East London's Stefflon Don). Both of these are included on Vida, as is the Justin Bieber remix of "Despacito." While some might find this marketing overkill, the inclusion of these hits adds depth to this ambitious, yet balanced offering. Album-opener and current single "Sola" (Spanish and Anglo versions bookend the set) underscores Fonsi's long-established reputation as one of the finest ballad singers that pop of any stripe has to offer. Its midtempo groove underscores the passion and pathos in the lyric, which he delivers with requisite commitment. It reminds us why, for the past decade, Fonsi has been such a Latin pop pioneer, he injects his version of the age-old tradition of cortavena (pathologically emotional songs) with dance, pop, bachata, reggaeton, vallenato, cumbia, and even rock & roll. Other power ballads on the set include the soaring "Le Pido al Cielo," the nearly processional "Dime Que No Te Iras," and "Ahi Estas Tu," with its layered acoustic guitars and sweeping strings that bind together romantico, Latin, and Anglo pop. The set's biggest surprise, however, is a duet with Demi Lovato on the bilingual vallenato/pop cumbia fusion "Exchame la Culpa" (Put the Blame on Me). Lovato invests the song with an uncharacteristic abandonment of empathy for searing emotion while simultaneously making room for the playful weave of rhythms and melody. Fonsi underscores every line with his own culpability and resolve, his phrasing trailing the backbeat for emphasis. Another highlight is "Tanto Para Nada," a tune that commences as a dramatic, polished ballad but unleashes cumbia and reggaeton in the chorus before skittering synthetic drum'n'bass breaks claim the bridge and outro. "Mas Fuerte Que Yo" finds Fonsi at his most dramatic, infusing a power ballad with reggaeton beats, slithering electric guitars, swelling strings and fat bass drums as he climbs above the heavily atmospheric mix to communicate the brokenness and devastation in the lyric. Remixes of "Calypso" and "Despacito" follow before the Anglo read of "Sola" closes the set. Vida displays all of Fonsi's gifts as a singer and songwriter. It's an impeccably sequenced collection that allows the wealth of conflicting emotions in these songs free rein amid catchy melodies and resonant dynamics, all carried by infectious beats. ~ Thom Jurek
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World - Released June 14, 2018 | UMLE - Latino

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World - Released January 1, 2013 | UMLE - Latino

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World - Released October 19, 2018 | UMLE - Latino

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World - Released August 17, 2018 | UMLE - Latino

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World - Released March 2, 2018 | UMLE - Latino

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Dance - Released May 5, 2017 | UMLE - Latino

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World - Released January 1, 2003 | Universal Music Latino

After three increasingly successful albums of lightly R&B-influenced Spanish-language pop, Puerto Rican crooner-heartthrob Luis Fonsi tried his hand at U.S. stardom by creating a dance/hip-hop persona for FIGHT THE FEELING. His fifth record, ABRAZAR LA VIDA, finds Fonsi not only returning to singing in Spanish, but to his familiar musical background-the ultra-catchy romantic pop that initially launched him into the public eye. Fonsi's pop is more a throwback to the blue-eyed soul-pop of the late-1980s-think George Michael at his most sincere-with lush production and heartfelt, emotive vocals wholly confident in their ability to caress a lover's soul. Fonsi opens ABRAZAR LA VIDA with the plaintive torch song "Quien Te Dijo Eso?," akin to Babyface's country turn on "When Will I See You Again," followed by the more R&B-flavored, but still torch-laden, title song. However, the dance floor is not ignored, as Latin horn touches snake in infectiously on the frenetic "Yo Te Propongo," an almost dizzying number. On ABRAZAR LA VIDA, Fonsi reveals himself to be most comfortable in the modern crooner dye, and casts a satisfying pop shadow with his fifth album.
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World - Released March 18, 2017 | UMLE - Latino

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World - Released May 5, 2017 | UMLE - Latino

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World - Released July 14, 2017 | Universal Music Latino

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World - Released January 26, 2018 | Universal Music Latino

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World - Released January 1, 2006 | National Own

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World - Released February 17, 2017 | UMLE - Latino

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Pop - Released January 1, 2005 | Universal Music Latino

When one thinks of Puerto Rican artists, the word that has generally come to mind over the years -- at least before the rise of reggaeton -- is "salsa." Salsa as in Tito Puente, Ray Barretto, Eddie Palmieri, Tito Rodriguez, Hector Lavoe, and Willie Colón. Salsa as in el Gran Combo, la Sonora Ponceña, and el Conjunto Clasico. But while many Puerto Ricans (along with Cubans, who invented salsa rhythms like son, cha cha, mambo, guaguancó, and danzon) have made valuable contributions to salsa, being Puerto Rican doesn't automatically mean being salsa-oriented. There are Puerto Rican popsters as well, including Luis Fonsi. Instead of catering to the tropical market, Fonsi has gone for an across-the-board appeal in the Spanish-speaking world -- and he continues in that Latin pop vein on Paso a Paso, which is definitely one of his stronger, more consistent releases. Fonsi hasn't always had great material to work with (his first English-language-oriented album, Fight the Feeling, was a disappointment), but this time, the songs (many of which he co-wrote) are above average. Paso a Paso is, by Latin standards, Top 40 fare -- and while the disc has a lot of adult contemporary appeal, Fonsi brings a bit of a rock edge to some of the tunes (especially "Por una Mujer," "Para Mi," and the soaring "Arropame"). Paso a Paso (which was mostly produced by Sebastian Krys) has some light ballads (including "Vivo Muriendo" and "Me Lo Dice el Alma"), but there are plenty of up-tempo items as well. Fonsi opts for variety, and it serves him well on Paso a Paso -- which, for all its sleekness and pop gloss, has plenty of meat on its bones. Those who have found some of Fonsi's previous albums to be uneven and inconsistent will be glad to know that Paso a Paso is a keeper. ~ Alex Henderson
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World - Released January 1, 1998 | Universal Music Latino

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World - Released January 1, 2008 | UMLE - Latino

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World - Released January 23, 2019 | UMLE - Latino