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World - Released April 26, 2019 | UMLE - Fonovisa

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Alternative & Indie - Released October 4, 2019 | Liberty & Lament

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Alternative & Indie - Released January 1, 2015 | Liberty & Lament Records

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Lucero's Nobody's Darlings is the sound of the Replacements, 20 years later, a little more sober, and from Memphis instead of Minneapolis. In other words, the band's occasional feints toward country music and electric blues come off with a lot more credibility and just as much enthusiasm. Just like the Replacements' Pleased to Meet Me, Lucero's seventh album is produced by local legend Jim Dickinson, but where some longtime Replacements fans thought Dickinson polished off a few too many of the 'Mats' rough edges, there's a loose, live feel to Nobody's Darlings that's in keeping with the rest of Lucero's catalog. Singer Ben Nichols is the band's best asset, and while his occasionally hoarse but always heartfelt vocals owe a lot not only to Paul Westerberg but to Social Distortion's Mike Ness, he's a better than average lyricist who covers the same ground as a hundred other rock & roll dudes -- "And We Fell" is the inebriation song, "California" is the frustration song -- but with enough regular-guy charm and occasionally sharp lines to keep from fading into the garage rock woodwork. ~ Stewart Mason

Alternative & Indie - Released May 22, 2001 | Liberty & Lament Records

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"...Whisky, loneliness, girls, guitars...indeed, the ground covered here is nothing new - But the songs always seem honest....Nichols possesses a raspy wistfulness all his own."
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World - Released October 14, 2016 | Universal Music Mexico

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Pop - Released April 23, 2002 | Sony Music Entertainment

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Latin America - Released November 9, 2018 | UMLE - Fonovisa

Alternative & Indie - Released January 1, 2015 | Liberty & Lament Records

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Lucero have never been short on Replacements comparisons, which are still very much valid on Rebels, Rogues & Sworn Brothers, but this time around they come off more like the Memphis version of Bruce Springsteen -- in the best possible way. This comparison is heard straightaway in the opening "What Else Would You Have Me Be?," and the subsequent music largely continues its loose and jangly feel, many songs rocking out in the tradition of those on 2005's Nobody's Darlings. However, thanks to the contributions of auxiliary player Rick Steff on nearly every track -- switching between organs, accordion, and piano -- the overall record sounds fuller and is more immediate than much of Lucero's past work. These extra touches cause rousing songs like the shimmering "I Can Get Us Out of Here" to be more triumphant, and the whiskey-soaked and weary homecoming of "On the Way Back Home" more affecting with a lonely accordion softly lamenting in the background. As always, frontman Ben Nichols owns the type of hapless charm that can simultaneously break your heart and fix it, his weathered voice like that of a close friend over six strings. The prominent interplay of rugged guitar and drums makes for a wholly gripping listen on darker cuts like "Sing Me No Hymns" and "The Weight of Guilt." Both match up compellingly with the gruff Southern drawl of Nichols, who douses his hoarse delivery in a hard-edged defiance that sharply cuts through the unusually threatening air, especially in the latter song with its challenging repetition of "If you can bear no cross, you can wear no crown." Reflections of love, regret, and longing dominate -- whether missing the girl while out on the road or making drunken promises when she's close enough to kiss -- yet Lucero's leathery alt-country melodies never forget that stirring balance of tenderness and toughness, heartache and wonder. It's that balance that ultimately makes Lucero so damn likable, and their music so damn good that you can't help but want to dance, sing, and drink along right there beside them all night. ~ Corey Apar
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Latin America - Released March 31, 2017 | UMLE - Fonovisa

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Alternative & Indie - Released January 1, 2012 | ATO Records (AT0)

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Alternative & Indie - Released September 18, 2015 | ATO Records (AT0)

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Latin America - Released May 11, 2018 | UMLE - Fonovisa

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World - Released September 24, 2004 | Lucero

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Latin America - Released February 16, 2018 | Fonovisa, Inc.

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World - Released June 19, 2007 | Sony Music Latin

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World - Released January 1, 1991 | Latino

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Latin America - Released July 31, 2007 | Musart - Balboa

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World - Released January 1, 2006 | EMI Mexico

Rock - Released September 24, 2002 | Madjack Records

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Ben Nichols, leader of Memphis alt-country rockers Lucero, claims he had never heard of Uncle Tupelo back when he traded in his punk stripes for a more roots rock sound. While this may sound like typical rhetoric from upstarts trying to avoid being cast into the alt-country ghetto, Tennessee, the group's sophomore outing, is strong enough evidence to back up that claim. Listening to this defiantly organic and strong release, one gets the sense that Nichols adopted a countrified sound simply because it seemed the shortest path to the heart. The album is packed with leather-tough Americana such as "Nights Like These," -- which is all guitar-crunch, rolling B-3 organ, and Nichols' hot-tar emotive rasp -- and the gliding, melodic country-rock of "Ain't So Lonely." There are also plenty of ruminative, bruised numbers on the album, such as "Sweet Little Thing," which eventually bursts out of a stark verse to reveal a Replacements-style hear-tugging rocker. The songs get a big kick in the pants from Nichols' vocals; he's a raw singer in the tradition of Steve Earle, Paul Westerberg, and Matthew Ryan. Cody Dickinson of the North Mississippi Allstars -- who also happens to be the son of legendary producer Jim Dickinson (Big Star, Replacements) -- produced this album and added keyboards. ~ Erik Hage
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World - Released March 6, 2012 | Skalona Records