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Solo Piano - Released October 27, 2017 | Sony Classical

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - Choc de Classica - 5 Sterne Fono Forum Klassik - 5 Sterne Fono Forum Jazz
The third album from Lucas Debargue with Sony Classical, this is a very original programme - the previous album offered a mixture of Bach, Beethoven and Medtner - which combines two Schubert sonatas (D.874, 1823, and D.664, 1819, respectively) and the ambitious Piano Sonata No. 2 (1910-11) from Szymanowksi, with post-Regerian momentum. Lucas Debargue, who sent shockwaves at the last Tchaikovsky competition, opens his new work with Sonata in A Minor, and gives it some truly tragic, wintry tones,  in the style of certain Russian pianists (Richter, Sofronitzky, etc.): a black and white keyboard, lit up by a recording effort that in no way dulls the harmonics. The cheeriest Sonata in A Major - which was a favourite of Wilhelm Kempff - has a similarly staid character, rather reserved. To be honest, this album seems to owe more than a little to Sviatoslav Richter. If Schubert was one of Richter's "obsessions", the Piano Sonata No. 2 from Szymanowksi was also at the heart of the Russian pianist's repertoire, who performed it several times in concert (e.g. at Parnassus, the concert for the centenary of Szymanowksi's birth on 26 November 1982 in Warsaw). A convulsive, tortured work, it is made up of two amply developed movements, which are very dark, dense and complex, including a theme and variations, crowned by a tremendous fugue. © TG/Qobuz
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Solo Piano - Released September 23, 2016 | Sony Classical

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 4F de Télérama - Choc de Classica - Choc Classica de l'année
The French pianist Lucas Debargue was a Tchaikovsky Competition sensation in 2015 (although he did not win), and this studio debut gives you a good idea of what the fuss was about. Debargue offers the French tradition in all its calmly urbane glory. You might like various aspects of this release: the unapologetically pianistic but flawlessly elegant Bach Toccata, the Medtner Sonata in F minor, Op. 5. You might sample one of the movements of the latter, inasmuch as the preponderance of recordings of Medtner's solo piano music tends to favor the thunder and lightning of Marc-André Hamelin, for example. Debargue does not reach such dramatic heights, but there's room for more restrained readings of Medtner. The highlight is the utterly distinctive reading of the Beethoven Piano Sonata in D major, Op. 10, No. 3. This work, with its four-movement plan and expansive themes, is generally taken as an example of how Beethoven was stretching his wings toward his epic style, but Debargue effectively takes it on its own terms, with a playful opening movement and an almost static slow movement that may not be to everyone's taste, but certainly makes something new of this much-played sonata. There's a good deal of intelligence and care shown in the small details throughout, and the recording marks Debargue as a young French artist to watch carefully.
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Classical - Released March 25, 2016 | Sony Classical

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Classical - Released September 23, 2016 | Sony Classical

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Classical - Released October 27, 2017 | Sony Classical

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French pianist Lucas Debargue began studying the piano seriously only as an adult, and he has made news with daring feats like appearing with an orchestra for the first time in the finals of the Tchaikovsky Competition. He's not so much an enfant terrible as a young pianist with an instinct for running counter to trends in a productive way, and those watching him may find this Sony Classical release a good place to start. Here he offers unusual interpretations of fairly common sonatas by Schubert, and an unusual work, the Piano Sonata No. 2 in A major, Op. 21, of Karol Szymanowski. The latter work was premiered by Arthur Rubinstein in 1911 and was played from time to time by Russian and Eastern European virtuosos, but nowadays is an uncommon item. It has been compared with Scriabin's larger works, but that makes it sound more experimental than it is. Rather, it has the flavor of an attempt to impose the spirit of Beethoven in the early 20th century. It's not so much Romantic or neo-Romantic as simply monumental. It's difficult -- think "Hammerklavier" difficult -- but more than that it's a giant rush of power, and for a time it put players and audiences off. Debargue surmounts the difficulties with real brilliance, and the music, if you let it, mounts in excitement. The pair of middle-period Schubert sonatas are taken out of the chamber dimensions of most of Schubert's music and put into the world of the monumental final three, with big forward momentum and plenty of playful, confident manipulation of the thematic material. Sample the opening movement of Piano Sonata in A minor, D. 784, for the effect, which will delight some and seem perverse to others. At the very least, Debargue is continuing to shake up both repertory and established traditions of interpretations; that he's having commercial success with this is all to the good.

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Lucas Debargue in the magazine