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Alternative & Indie - Released March 30, 2015 | Ribbon Music

Distinctions Pitchfork: Best New Music
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"Suckers Shangri-La," the opening cut on the Jana Hunter-led, Baltimore-based experimental pop unit's third studio outing, wastes little time in getting down to the nuts and bolts of what Escape from Evil is aiming for. Sinewy and seductive, Hunter smooths out some of the rough edges of the band's previous guises, opting for a shimmery blast of pure Siouxsie Sioux-inspired, retro electro-pop that's as chilly as it is downright confectionary. "Ondine" more or less follows suit, though it eschews the latter's penchant for icy, late-'80s soundtrack pop in favor of a more subdued, though no less midnight-black ambience that invokes names like Anna Calvi, Beach House, and even Cat Power. Shades of Lower Dens' minimalist past appear relatively consistently throughout the album's just over-40-minute runtime, but they tend to materialize as breaths in between bigger pop moments; empty bridges with which to either populate or tear down. There's an ache behind these songs that belies their radio-ready packaging, but the band's steady Krautrock demeanor and Hunter's innate theatricality (think a measured amalgamation of Diamanda Galas, Annie Lennox, and Thin White Duke-era David Bowie) help to keep the darkness in check, and what ultimately shines through is sort of pure pop, albeit goth-tinged, elegance that paints everything in a sort of cool, 2:00 A.M. haze of cigarette smoke and dashboard-blue light. That pained, urban chic is best exemplified by Escape from Evil's lead single "To Die in L.A.," a propulsive blast of AOR synth pop symmetry that's as danceable as it is dripping with melancholy. It couldn't be further removed from the group's brooding, slow burn, lo-fi beginnings, but it carries a similar emotional weight. Hunter is an enigmatic presence, and even with the all of the new trimmings, his rich alto always rises to the forefront, carefully shepherding in the band's newfound sonic might with equal parts audacity and vulnerability. ~ James Christopher Monger
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Alternative & Indie - Released September 6, 2019 | Ribbon Music

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At the crossing point between new wave, shimmering retro pop, and dreamy, reverb-drenched atmospheres, there is ... Lower Dens. The ruler of queer-chic, Jana Hunter, started out in 2010 with a bona fide indie rock band, and it was mostly a sum of lo-fi DIY inspirations. These days (2019), the caterpillar is more like a butterfly, called Competition. Sonically, the record is a tribute to the 80s - U2, New Order, A Flock of Seagulls - the band has veered from their guitar-focused roots, while defending their political beliefs no matter the cost. Proof is in the pudding with the controversial single Young Republicans, which depicts the right-of-center as psychopathic cannibals in its youtube video. Needless to say the song was banned from the airwaves in the United States. It's the radios' loss, Because Competition HAS Some real gems, such as the banging dance tune Lucky People. Synthpop is the keyword of this fourth record, but they finished this album in style, with an excellent piano ballad, titled In Your House; melancholy, gender-fluidity and an amazing tone of voice are the ingredients for this stripped-down gem. Great execution, and amazing production throughout. © Alexis Renaudat/Qobuz
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Alternative & Indie - Released July 9, 2019 | Ribbon Music

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Alternative & Indie - Released August 20, 2019 | Ribbon Music

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Alternative & Indie - Released | Ribbon Music

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Swathed in an undersea murkiness, Lower Dens' debut album, Twin-Hand Movement, explores the more ethereal side of freak folk. There’s a kind of understated beauty at work here. Rather than sweeping, melodic grandeur, subtlety is the watchword. Lower Dens have an approach to melody that skews toward Krautrock, utilizing patient repetition to draw the listener slowly into their haunting den of harmony. “I Get Nervous” and “Plastic and Powder” show off the band's talent for careful layering, delicately adding guitars to create a reverby nest of sound for the vocals to rest in. The pacing of the album is also interesting. Twin-Hand Movement plays out like the soundtrack to an all-night hangout, beginning at sundown with the dusky “Blue and Silver,” moving through the night with a languid middle section, and then ending with the upbeat “Hospice Gates” and “Two Cocks Waving Wildly at Each Other Across a Vast Open Space, a Dark Icy Tundra,” concluding the album with the hopeful promise of a new dawn. All in all, Twin-Hand Movement is everything you’d expect from an album from one of the new creative centers for indie music at the moment (Baltimore), featuring singer/songwriter Jana Hunter and put out by the king of freak folk, Devendra Banhart, giving Lower Dens an almost unfair advantage in the pedigree department. What really matters, though, is that Twin-Hand Movement is an album that’s textural, moody, surprising, and, most importantly, really good. ~ Gregory Heaney
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Alternative & Indie - Released May 1, 2012 | Ribbon Music

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Alternative & Indie - Released May 30, 2019 | Ribbon Music

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Alternative & Indie - Released May 9, 2017 | Ribbon Music

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Alternative & Indie - Released September 13, 2016 | Ribbon Music

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Alternative & Indie - Released March 11, 2015 | Ribbon Music

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Alternative & Indie - Released January 30, 2015 | Ribbon Music

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Lower Dens in the magazine