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Jazz - Released July 6, 1945 | Decca

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Jazz - Released February 23, 1999 | Geffen

Jazz - Released October 15, 2007 | Disques Black & Blue

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Louis Jordan's final recording (he died 15 months later), I Believe in Music has been reissued on CD, along with six previously unreleased selections. Although Jordan had not been a hitmaker in around 20 years and had been somewhat neglected during the decade before the set, he was still in his musical prime both vocally and instrumentally. The altoist is teamed with tenorman Irv Cox and a rhythm section led by pianist Duke Burrell. There are a few remakes of past hits (including "Caldonia," "Is You Is or Is You Ain't My Baby," "Saturday Night Fish Fry" and "I'm Gonna Move to the Outskirts of Town"), along with newer jump material. Jordan is in good form and high spirits throughout this date. Recommended. ~ Scott Yanow

Jazz - Released April 13, 2015 | Penny Records

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When Louis Jordan signed to Mercury in 1956, he tried to revive his struggling record sales by re-recording some of his more celebrated songs from his commercial heyday. That's a strategy usually doomed to commercial and artistic failure, and commercially this album -- including such Jordan standbys as "Caldonia," "Let the Good Times Roll," "Choo Choo Ch' Boogie," "I'm Gonna Move to the Outskirts of Town," and "Ain't Nobody Here But Us Chickens" -- certainly didn't pay big dividends. But while no one would rate this as highly as the original jump blues classics with which Jordan made his mark, actually both he and his band performed pretty admirably given the circumstances, updating the originals only slightly to reflect the emerging rock & roll trends, with a young Quincy Jones acting as musical director. Session ace Mickey Baker was on guitar as well, and reeled off some really hot licks on occasion (especially on "Caldonia"), though he wasn't given as long a leash as he could have been. It's more for the serious Jordan fan, though, than someone who wants just one or a few Jordan records, who would be better off with collections of his earlier material. ~ Richie Unterberger

Jazz - Released January 1, 2008 | Werner Last's Favourites Jazz

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Jazz - Released June 1, 1999 | Verve Reissues

GRP's Swingsation sampler may not satisfy collectors and hardcore fans, who already have these 16 featured songs on original albums or comprehensive collections. Nevertheless, this is a good collection for casual fans and neophytes, since it contains a good balance of familiar hits and lesser-known tunes from Louis Jordan's Decca recordings, including "House Party," "Saturday Night Fish Fry," "Ain't Nobody Here But Us Chickens," "Crazy Baby," "Chartreuse (You Dyed Your Hair)," "That Chick's Too Young Too Fry," "Blue Light Boogie," "Barnyard Boogie," and "Let the Good Times Roll." True, there are a number of great songs, such as "Caledonia," missing, but it's an enjoyable listen that's worth its budget-price for budget-minded listeners. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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Blues - Released September 14, 1999 | Geffen

A very fun but very short (37 minutes) sampling of Louis Jordan hits recorded for Decca between 1942 ("Five Guys Named Moe") and 1953 ("I Want You to Be My Baby"). Designed as more of an introduction, 20th Century Masters includes such Jordan staples as "Caldonia" and "Saturday Night Fish Fry." This brief compilation may be a good place to start, but it'll leave you wanting more. ~ Joslyn Layne
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Jazz - Released January 1, 1975 | Geffen

This is a best-of CD collection that actually lives up to its name. Virtually all of Louis Jordan's hits, which musically bridged the gap between small-group swing, R&B, and rock & roll, are on this single CD, including "Choo Choo Ch'Boogie," "Let the Good Times Roll," "Ain't Nobody Here But Us Chickens," "Saturday Night Fish Fry," "Caldonia," "Five Guys Named Moe," and "Don't Let the Sun Catch You Crying." Serious collectors will want to explore a more complete series, particularly the one put out by Classics, but for a single acquisition, this is the Louis Jordan set to get. Jordan's very likable and good-humored vocals and his hot alto, as well as the playing of the Tympani Five, belong in everyone's music collection. ~ Scott Yanow

Jazz - Released September 30, 1987 | 1201 MUSIC

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Blues - Released January 1, 1999 | Geffen

Released as an attempt to cash in on the swing revival that swept through America in the late '90s, MCA's At the Swing Cat's Ball contains 12 songs that spotlight Louis Jordan's hardest-swinging material. Since Jordan towered above most jump blues practitioners in the '40s, it's easy to enjoy the compilation, even if you question the reasons behind its assembly. Since it concentrates on swinging material, it isn't a strict hits compilation (even though there are hits here), but that probably won't bother Generation Y swingers, whom this compilation is clearly targeted at. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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Jazz - Released January 1, 1992 | Geffen

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Blues - Released January 9, 2019 | SPV

Pop - Released September 12, 2018 | ITSrecords

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Jazz - Released January 1, 1992 | Verve

Jazz - Released January 1, 2003 | HDJ

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Nearly all of the music on this European LP has since been reissued on CD, but it did give listeners a fine sampling of the lesser-known recordings of Louis Jordan's Tympani Five. Jordan, who is well showcased on both vocals and alto, is heard on 16 selections taken from 11 sessions spanning nearly an eight-year period. Such obscurities as his renditions of "Pompton Turnpike," "T-Bone Blues," "I Know What You're Puttin' Down" and "Chicky-Mo Craney Crow" are on this album, along with two hits: "Deacon Jones" and "G.I. Jive." But get the more complete CDs instead. ~ Scott Yanow

Jazz - Released January 2, 1946 | Decca

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